web site hit counter Point Made: How to Write Like the Nation's Top Advocates - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Point Made: How to Write Like the Nation's Top Advocates

Availability: Ready to download

With Point Made, legal writing expert Ross Guberman throws a life preserver to attorneys, who are under more pressure than ever to produce compelling prose. What is the strongest opening for a motion or brief? How to draft winning headings? How to tell a persuasive story when the record is dry and dense? The answers are "more science than art," says Guberman, who has analy With Point Made, legal writing expert Ross Guberman throws a life preserver to attorneys, who are under more pressure than ever to produce compelling prose. What is the strongest opening for a motion or brief? How to draft winning headings? How to tell a persuasive story when the record is dry and dense? The answers are "more science than art," says Guberman, who has analyzed stellar arguments by distinguished attorneys to develop step-by-step instructions for achieving the results you want The author takes an empirical approach, drawing heavily on the writings of the nation's 50 most influential lawyers, including Barack Obama, John Roberts, Elena Kagan, Ted Olson, and David Boies. Their strategies, demystified and broken down into specific, learnable techniques, become a detailed writing guide full of practical models. In FCC v. Fox, for example, Kathleen Sullivan conjures the potentially dangerous, unintended consequences of finding for the other side (the "Why Should I Care?" technique). Arguing against allowing the FCC to continue fining broadcasters that let the "F-word" slip out, she highlights the chilling effect these fines have on America's radio and TV stations, "discouraging live programming altogether, with attendant loss to valuable and vibrant programming that has long been part of American culture." Each chapter of Point Made focuses on a typically tough challenge, providing a strategic roadmap and practical tips along with annotated examples of how prominent attorneys have resolved that challenge in varied trial and appellate briefs. Short examples and explanations with engaging titles--"Brass Tacks," "Talk to Yourself," "Russian Doll"--deliver weighty materials with a light tone, making the guidelines easy to remember and apply.


Compare

With Point Made, legal writing expert Ross Guberman throws a life preserver to attorneys, who are under more pressure than ever to produce compelling prose. What is the strongest opening for a motion or brief? How to draft winning headings? How to tell a persuasive story when the record is dry and dense? The answers are "more science than art," says Guberman, who has analy With Point Made, legal writing expert Ross Guberman throws a life preserver to attorneys, who are under more pressure than ever to produce compelling prose. What is the strongest opening for a motion or brief? How to draft winning headings? How to tell a persuasive story when the record is dry and dense? The answers are "more science than art," says Guberman, who has analyzed stellar arguments by distinguished attorneys to develop step-by-step instructions for achieving the results you want The author takes an empirical approach, drawing heavily on the writings of the nation's 50 most influential lawyers, including Barack Obama, John Roberts, Elena Kagan, Ted Olson, and David Boies. Their strategies, demystified and broken down into specific, learnable techniques, become a detailed writing guide full of practical models. In FCC v. Fox, for example, Kathleen Sullivan conjures the potentially dangerous, unintended consequences of finding for the other side (the "Why Should I Care?" technique). Arguing against allowing the FCC to continue fining broadcasters that let the "F-word" slip out, she highlights the chilling effect these fines have on America's radio and TV stations, "discouraging live programming altogether, with attendant loss to valuable and vibrant programming that has long been part of American culture." Each chapter of Point Made focuses on a typically tough challenge, providing a strategic roadmap and practical tips along with annotated examples of how prominent attorneys have resolved that challenge in varied trial and appellate briefs. Short examples and explanations with engaging titles--"Brass Tacks," "Talk to Yourself," "Russian Doll"--deliver weighty materials with a light tone, making the guidelines easy to remember and apply.

30 review for Point Made: How to Write Like the Nation's Top Advocates

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Does Harvard Law School produce great writers, or do we assume someone is a great writer because they went to Harvard? - Look, I just asked a rhetorical question. Mr. Guberman would be so proud. Or possibly not. His unequivocal enthusiasm for sentence fragments and lengthy, punchy sentences dims somewhat in the face of rhetorical questions. It is the only time he references Antonin Scalia, arguably one of the most powerful legal writers of our time. (Incidentally, another Harvard graduate.) Cons Does Harvard Law School produce great writers, or do we assume someone is a great writer because they went to Harvard? - Look, I just asked a rhetorical question. Mr. Guberman would be so proud. Or possibly not. His unequivocal enthusiasm for sentence fragments and lengthy, punchy sentences dims somewhat in the face of rhetorical questions. It is the only time he references Antonin Scalia, arguably one of the most powerful legal writers of our time. (Incidentally, another Harvard graduate.) Considering his mania for high profile figures like RBG, Eric Holder, and Barack Obama, you would think Scalia would get more than a modicum of praise. At the same time, I suspect political persuasion has some influence here. No? You think his ad-nauseam references to that one case argued by Ted Cruz (a Harvard graduate) counters my point? Maybe. At least I understood what Ted Cruz meant; I cannot say the same of the Eric Holder quotes. (In my best Mr. Guberman style, I shall now insert a somewhat illegible comment about how I really should have more clearly mirrored the above statement about Cruz and Holder. What am I talking about? It doesn't matter. Moving on.) I like the idea of this book. I certainly agree that you become a better writer by reading good writing. At the very least, the reader should walk away from this book more conscientious of grammar usage. However, (Whoops! Mr. Guberman butting into my head again. 'However' is overused and overly lengthy. Better ignore professional writing and begin the sentence 'But'.) BUT this book failed to impress me. I will forget about it very quickly. Out of context-quotes only go so far. It does not help any that the author repeatedly re-uses the out of context quotes and quotes the same people over and over. It all starts to sound the same after a while. He never sold me on the 'why' of these particular people and these particular methods. Most of his advise comes down to good writing; I don't need a cutesy catch-phrase to remember to balance my sentences. Poor writing runs rife within the legal community. I agree. I applaud Mr. Guberman for trying to counter that by pointing to well-written briefs. I am just not sure an occasional paragraph here or there from big name individuals does much. Still, an illustrative work and an easy read. I probably will come back to it for some of the most pertinent portions (such as "135 Transition Words and Phrases.)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chaunceton Bird

    Without a doubt, this is essential reading for any legal writer seeking to produce creative, persuasive writing. Mr. Guberman's crack advice, sharp prose, and examples from the nation's top advocates make this a must have for law students and attorneys. Without a doubt, this is essential reading for any legal writer seeking to produce creative, persuasive writing. Mr. Guberman's crack advice, sharp prose, and examples from the nation's top advocates make this a must have for law students and attorneys.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brendan Hall

    Useful legal writing book with tips and techniques worth implementing. Guberman does the near-impossible by making a notoriously dry subject interesting with lively examples. I would recommend this book to any lawyer.

  4. 5 out of 5

    TEELOCK Mithilesh

    Ross Guberman’s legal writing masterpiece, Point Made: How to Write Like the Nation’s Top Advocates, is first on the list of the 7 best legal writing books of all time for good reason – it will make you a better legal writer. You’ll love Point Made because it provides immediate, actionable tips and techniques to greatly improve your legal writing on day one. Guberman refers to these tips and techniques as the “Fifty Techniques.” Point Made is divided into five, easy to read sections: (1) the Theme Ross Guberman’s legal writing masterpiece, Point Made: How to Write Like the Nation’s Top Advocates, is first on the list of the 7 best legal writing books of all time for good reason – it will make you a better legal writer. You’ll love Point Made because it provides immediate, actionable tips and techniques to greatly improve your legal writing on day one. Guberman refers to these tips and techniques as the “Fifty Techniques.” Point Made is divided into five, easy to read sections: (1) the Theme; (2) the Tale; (3) the Meat; (4) the Words; and (5) the Close. In each section of Point Made, Guberman shows you how to apply the Fifty Techniques by providing countless examples of how these techniques are used by some of today’s top legal writers, like Ted Olson, John Roberts, and Frank Easterbrook, to name just a few. To help take your legal writing skills to the next level, Point Made concludes with 50 legal writing exercises corresponding with each of the Fifty Techniques. Simply put, Point Made more than deserves its spot as one of the best legal writing books on the market today.

  5. 4 out of 5

    B

    The first third or so of this book teaches one (multipart) writing lesson: If you are famous and can argue from authority and if you have a one-paragraph argument and if that paragraph has a bold phrase, then the bold phrase looks impressive. There's a lot of argument from authority in the beginning and a lot of disconnected grammar/wordsmithing thoughts. Toward the middle, this book really shines. It does much better at explaining sentence-level problems than it does at brief-level or structura The first third or so of this book teaches one (multipart) writing lesson: If you are famous and can argue from authority and if you have a one-paragraph argument and if that paragraph has a bold phrase, then the bold phrase looks impressive. There's a lot of argument from authority in the beginning and a lot of disconnected grammar/wordsmithing thoughts. Toward the middle, this book really shines. It does much better at explaining sentence-level problems than it does at brief-level or structural issues. The exercises in the very back would have been more helpful if they were smaller scale and scattered throughout. (Or, why not both?)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    The most useful thing is that I feel like this book gives me permission to do what I was going to do anyway. Like use one space after a period or sprinkle in semicolons. And start a sentence with "and." The discussion about how to deal with the other side's cases is very good. I didn't necessarily think he established that certain strategies make your writing better--just that they are what other writers use. Also, I hate the point-counterpoint tables he suggests near the end. The most useful thing is that I feel like this book gives me permission to do what I was going to do anyway. Like use one space after a period or sprinkle in semicolons. And start a sentence with "and." The discussion about how to deal with the other side's cases is very good. I didn't necessarily think he established that certain strategies make your writing better--just that they are what other writers use. Also, I hate the point-counterpoint tables he suggests near the end.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    Newly minted lawyers who expect to write a lot of persuasive documents should read this closely. He recommends practices that are second nature to really good brief writers (at least at my old firm) but mainly learned on the job from other really good brief writers. And not everyone gets that chance. So he's done a real service to the profession here. Newly minted lawyers who expect to write a lot of persuasive documents should read this closely. He recommends practices that are second nature to really good brief writers (at least at my old firm) but mainly learned on the job from other really good brief writers. And not everyone gets that chance. So he's done a real service to the profession here.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Johnson

    Interesting premise. This book set out what it proposed rather well, and provided some well written examples of technique. My only gripe is that I wish there were more such demonstrations from others. Show, don't tell, is the best policy with most things. Interesting premise. This book set out what it proposed rather well, and provided some well written examples of technique. My only gripe is that I wish there were more such demonstrations from others. Show, don't tell, is the best policy with most things.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lulu

    I'm not in law school, however, I found the pointers in this book relevant in my immediate professional environment and helpful with going back to college. I found it helpful to go through this book with a word document and type out everything that was directly applicable to me. I'm not in law school, however, I found the pointers in this book relevant in my immediate professional environment and helpful with going back to college. I found it helpful to go through this book with a word document and type out everything that was directly applicable to me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia Noll

    If you are in law school, read this book. It absolutely revolutionized my writing. It’s so clear and he gives so many examples to support his tips. This book feels like a hidden secret to being an amazing legal writer

  11. 5 out of 5

    R. Jones

    Essential reading for any attorney who wants to refine his or her writing. Fifty useful tips are laid out and explained, with examples given from some of the country's best legal writers. It's fantastic. I would recommend this book to anybody who wants to improve their practice. Essential reading for any attorney who wants to refine his or her writing. Fifty useful tips are laid out and explained, with examples given from some of the country's best legal writers. It's fantastic. I would recommend this book to anybody who wants to improve their practice.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Read this as a review during moot court competition. It provided some review of basic legal writing concepts along with practical tips to improve overall style. I read it as an audiobook, but I still found the examples easy to follow.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amavalapizza

    Excellent advice and examples. Recommend to anyone who needs or wants to write persuasively.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Great read for litigators As litigators we read and write; write and read. This book gave me a lot of ideas on how to liven up my writing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    Well-written; lots of short, actionable techniques and plenty of examples. Wished I'd had this during my first-year writing class. Well-written; lots of short, actionable techniques and plenty of examples. Wished I'd had this during my first-year writing class.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    To quote another reviewer named Amy, "Considering his mania for high profile figures like RBG, Eric Holder, and Barack Obama, you would think Scalia would get more than a modicum of praise." To quote another reviewer named Amy, "Considering his mania for high profile figures like RBG, Eric Holder, and Barack Obama, you would think Scalia would get more than a modicum of praise."

  17. 5 out of 5

    The Montgomery Bookshelf | Sarah Montgomery

    Great for aspiring writers, or just anyone who writes argumentatively.

  18. 4 out of 5

    William Lawrence

    Me write gooder

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Willis

    Very useful and engaging.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Al Menaster

    Best book on legal writing I've ever read. Very specific, detailed suggestions, with lots of short and good examples. Best book on legal writing I've ever read. Very specific, detailed suggestions, with lots of short and good examples.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Steve Feldman

    excellent

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    tops

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Learned more in an afternoon of reading this book than I did in a semester of legal writing class.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    There is great advice in here. But I have never been good about incorporating writing advice. Maybe some of it will just filter in through just reading about it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Good reference and practical legal writing guide.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dani

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paulius

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brian

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.