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The Wreck of the Red Arrow: An American Train Tragedy

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7x10, cloth with dust jacket, 184 pages. "Just after 3 am on February 18, 1947, a crack passenger train of the Pennsylvania Railroad pierced the fog and frigid air in the Allegheny Mountains of Pennsylvania." Table of Contents Preface and Acknowledgments Chapter 1 Bennington Chapter 2 Aftermath Chapter 3 Philadelphia Chapter 4 Response Chapter 5 "Chocolaty Mints" Chapter 6 7x10, cloth with dust jacket, 184 pages. "Just after 3 am on February 18, 1947, a crack passenger train of the Pennsylvania Railroad pierced the fog and frigid air in the Allegheny Mountains of Pennsylvania." Table of Contents Preface and Acknowledgments Chapter 1 Bennington Chapter 2 Aftermath Chapter 3 Philadelphia Chapter 4 Response Chapter 5 "Chocolaty Mints" Chapter 6 "Up There Somewhere" Chapter 7 Investigation Chapter 8 Inquest Chapter 9 Requiem Chapter 10 The Littlest Passenger Appendices Sources and Notes Bibliography Index Credits "On February 18, 1947, the Red Arrow's "consist" (pronounced with the accent on the con), a railroading term meaning the equipment on a train behind the locomotives and tenders, was fourteen cars in the following order: 1. Postal Car 5473 2. Passenger Coach-Baggage Car 4758 (called a "Combine") 3. Passenger Coach 4289 4. Pullman McCarr 5. Pullman Shraders 6. Dining Car 7960 7. Pullman East Alton 8. Pullman Ogden Canyon 9. Pullman Cascade Timber 10. Pullman Dixie Land 11. Pullman Cascade Heights 12. Pullman Francis Hopkinson 13. Passenger Coach 4013 14. Baggage-Express Car 5959. Like most overnight passenger trains, the Red Arrow had sleeping cars known as "Pullmans" manufactured and operated by the Pullman Company of Chicago. (The Pennsylvania Railroad numbered its cars, while the Pullman Company gave charming names to its cars.)"


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7x10, cloth with dust jacket, 184 pages. "Just after 3 am on February 18, 1947, a crack passenger train of the Pennsylvania Railroad pierced the fog and frigid air in the Allegheny Mountains of Pennsylvania." Table of Contents Preface and Acknowledgments Chapter 1 Bennington Chapter 2 Aftermath Chapter 3 Philadelphia Chapter 4 Response Chapter 5 "Chocolaty Mints" Chapter 6 7x10, cloth with dust jacket, 184 pages. "Just after 3 am on February 18, 1947, a crack passenger train of the Pennsylvania Railroad pierced the fog and frigid air in the Allegheny Mountains of Pennsylvania." Table of Contents Preface and Acknowledgments Chapter 1 Bennington Chapter 2 Aftermath Chapter 3 Philadelphia Chapter 4 Response Chapter 5 "Chocolaty Mints" Chapter 6 "Up There Somewhere" Chapter 7 Investigation Chapter 8 Inquest Chapter 9 Requiem Chapter 10 The Littlest Passenger Appendices Sources and Notes Bibliography Index Credits "On February 18, 1947, the Red Arrow's "consist" (pronounced with the accent on the con), a railroading term meaning the equipment on a train behind the locomotives and tenders, was fourteen cars in the following order: 1. Postal Car 5473 2. Passenger Coach-Baggage Car 4758 (called a "Combine") 3. Passenger Coach 4289 4. Pullman McCarr 5. Pullman Shraders 6. Dining Car 7960 7. Pullman East Alton 8. Pullman Ogden Canyon 9. Pullman Cascade Timber 10. Pullman Dixie Land 11. Pullman Cascade Heights 12. Pullman Francis Hopkinson 13. Passenger Coach 4013 14. Baggage-Express Car 5959. Like most overnight passenger trains, the Red Arrow had sleeping cars known as "Pullmans" manufactured and operated by the Pullman Company of Chicago. (The Pennsylvania Railroad numbered its cars, while the Pullman Company gave charming names to its cars.)"

30 review for The Wreck of the Red Arrow: An American Train Tragedy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    Another thoroughly enjoyable book on a little known aspect of local (Altoona area) history by Dennis P McIlnay! However, unlike "The Horseshoe Curve", this book left me with more questions than answers. The author did an amazing job of piecing together what happened to the Red Arrow, and collecting survivor accounts when no passenger list existed. I'd love to know more about the individuals, about the political pressure the PRR wielded in Altoona and how that effected the attitudes both before an Another thoroughly enjoyable book on a little known aspect of local (Altoona area) history by Dennis P McIlnay! However, unlike "The Horseshoe Curve", this book left me with more questions than answers. The author did an amazing job of piecing together what happened to the Red Arrow, and collecting survivor accounts when no passenger list existed. I'd love to know more about the individuals, about the political pressure the PRR wielded in Altoona and how that effected the attitudes both before and after the wreck, about the changes made in the wake of the wreck, etc. It was said a few times that people felt trains were safer than flying--were there airplane crashes around the time of the Red Arrow, or was it just unease over new technology? How did the Red Arrow wreck compare to previous train wrecks, either speed or obstruction caused? Here's my vote for his next book to be on the Portage Railroad!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    Interesting story about a little known train wreck in 1947 about 2 hours east of Pittsburgh. While Mr. McIlnay took me through the wreck, it was the personal stories he brought to the book that made me enjoy the book. He had stories of both the dead and those who survived or rescued the survivors. I cried as I read some of the stories and cheered for others. I'm glad that there are writers of history who give us the events that are not taught in school. Interesting story about a little known train wreck in 1947 about 2 hours east of Pittsburgh. While Mr. McIlnay took me through the wreck, it was the personal stories he brought to the book that made me enjoy the book. He had stories of both the dead and those who survived or rescued the survivors. I cried as I read some of the stories and cheered for others. I'm glad that there are writers of history who give us the events that are not taught in school.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Mertens

    I thought this was an interesting report. I learned a little about some state history reading this. I thought the investigations into this tragedy some of the most interesting parts. I never knew this happened and so often we are not educated about many of the dangers that excited in ordinary life not so long ago. I liked hearing about the people's lives who were involved in the wreck. Good book for history buffs. I thought this was an interesting report. I learned a little about some state history reading this. I thought the investigations into this tragedy some of the most interesting parts. I never knew this happened and so often we are not educated about many of the dangers that excited in ordinary life not so long ago. I liked hearing about the people's lives who were involved in the wreck. Good book for history buffs.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Misty Stanley

  5. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  6. 4 out of 5

    Art

  7. 4 out of 5

    Grant Morden

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vicki Haid

  9. 4 out of 5

    James Schmitt

  10. 4 out of 5

    phil breidenbach

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kjpbooks

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jack

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gunner

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

  15. 5 out of 5

    George R Potter Jr

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark Frew

  17. 5 out of 5

    Craig

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  19. 4 out of 5

    Barry Peffer

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dan Kasper

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessika

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Levins

  23. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Mcmasters

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Carter

  26. 4 out of 5

    Swamp Ophelia

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  28. 5 out of 5

    Josh Romig

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Yankanich

  30. 4 out of 5

    Allyson Shaw

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