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The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh

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In 1926, the world was introduced to a portly little bear named Winnie-the-Pooh. Along with his young friend, Christopher Robin, Pooh delighted readers from the very beginning. His often befuddled perceptions and adorable insights won the hearts of everyone around him, including his close group of friends. From the energetic Tigger to the dismal Eeyore, A. A. Milne created In 1926, the world was introduced to a portly little bear named Winnie-the-Pooh. Along with his young friend, Christopher Robin, Pooh delighted readers from the very beginning. His often befuddled perceptions and adorable insights won the hearts of everyone around him, including his close group of friends. From the energetic Tigger to the dismal Eeyore, A. A. Milne created a charming bunch, both entertaining and inspirational. These simple creatures often reflected a small piece of all of us: humble, silly, wise, cautious, creative, and full of life. Remember when Piglet did a very grand thing, or Eeyore's almost-forgotten birthday? Gorgeous watercolor illustrations from Ernest H. Shepard appear in all their glory. With beautiful colors and simple lines, these images hold their own as classics. The tales, filled with superb story lines and lessons, will continue to capture the hearts of new generations.


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In 1926, the world was introduced to a portly little bear named Winnie-the-Pooh. Along with his young friend, Christopher Robin, Pooh delighted readers from the very beginning. His often befuddled perceptions and adorable insights won the hearts of everyone around him, including his close group of friends. From the energetic Tigger to the dismal Eeyore, A. A. Milne created In 1926, the world was introduced to a portly little bear named Winnie-the-Pooh. Along with his young friend, Christopher Robin, Pooh delighted readers from the very beginning. His often befuddled perceptions and adorable insights won the hearts of everyone around him, including his close group of friends. From the energetic Tigger to the dismal Eeyore, A. A. Milne created a charming bunch, both entertaining and inspirational. These simple creatures often reflected a small piece of all of us: humble, silly, wise, cautious, creative, and full of life. Remember when Piglet did a very grand thing, or Eeyore's almost-forgotten birthday? Gorgeous watercolor illustrations from Ernest H. Shepard appear in all their glory. With beautiful colors and simple lines, these images hold their own as classics. The tales, filled with superb story lines and lessons, will continue to capture the hearts of new generations.

30 review for The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    I bet if he had called it Whiney the Pooh it wouldn't be so popular... Aw look, out of fucking honey again, why does this always happen to meeee.... and my dealer's been arrested....and they stopped my benefits payments again ... I bet if he had called it Whiney the Pooh it wouldn't be so popular... Aw look, out of fucking honey again, why does this always happen to meeee.... and my dealer's been arrested....and they stopped my benefits payments again ...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    For the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (9) versus The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh (24) It was a most enjoyable picnic. Pooh was just finishing the last bit of honey and licking around the edge of the pot in a Contented Way, when he suddenly realised that he was sitting on something. Something damp and squishy. Something... "Oh bother!!" said Pooh. "Drat and bother and double bother!!! I've sat on two of Rabbit's Friends and Relations! For the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (9) versus The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh (24) It was a most enjoyable picnic. Pooh was just finishing the last bit of honey and licking around the edge of the pot in a Contented Way, when he suddenly realised that he was sitting on something. Something damp and squishy. Something... "Oh bother!!" said Pooh. "Drat and bother and double bother!!! I've sat on two of Rabbit's Friends and Relations! Oh, what will Christopher Robin say!" Christopher Robin came over and examined the two former mice. "Pooh," he said gravely, "these are not Friends and Relations. They are Deadly Killer Mice From Outer Space. You are the Best Bear In The World, and you have Saved The Hundred Acre Wood." And Pooh had never felt so proud and happy in all his life.

  3. 5 out of 5

    ·Karen·

    Celebrity Death Match Review Elimination Tournament Round 2 The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh vs Heart of Darkness Hush Hush! Whisper who dares! Christopher Robin is saying his prayers. God bless Mummy. I know that's right. Ooh wasn't it funny at teatime tonight? There was Tigger and Owl and Kanga and Roo And Jozef Korzeniowski and Piglet and Pooh And wasn't Joe greedy? Straight from the sea He wolfed down the cake and left none for me. And Owl kept on winking and shaking his head But nodded Celebrity Death Match Review Elimination Tournament Round 2 The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh vs Heart of Darkness Hush Hush! Whisper who dares! Christopher Robin is saying his prayers. God bless Mummy. I know that's right. Ooh wasn't it funny at teatime tonight? There was Tigger and Owl and Kanga and Roo And Jozef Korzeniowski and Piglet and Pooh And wasn't Joe greedy? Straight from the sea He wolfed down the cake and left none for me. And Owl kept on winking and shaking his head But nodded and beamed when I only took bread Then Joe fell to the floor, clutching his tum And I got so frightened I called for my Mum But God bless Rabbit and God bless Pooh For whisking the crumbs away and the plate too And Joe looked so ill, and his face was so white And the doctor says that he won't last the night Oh! Thank you, God, for a lovely day. And what was the other I had to say? I said "Bless Rabbit," so what can it be? Oh! Now I remember it. God bless Me. Hush Hush! Whisper who dares! Christopher Robin is saying his prayers. (Note: No animals were injured during the making of this review)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    For the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament, Heart of Darkness (25) versus The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh (24) Pooh was getting rather tired of everyone ganging up on him, and he wondered if there was some way he could grab just a couple more votes. He suddenly thought of his old friend Vikki Blows. Now if he inserted the picture here... "Oh, help!" said Pooh, as a half-dozen angry comments appeared on his screen. "If only I hadn't--" he said, as a dozen even more angry message For the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament, Heart of Darkness (25) versus The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh (24) Pooh was getting rather tired of everyone ganging up on him, and he wondered if there was some way he could grab just a couple more votes. He suddenly thought of his old friend Vikki Blows. Now if he inserted the picture here... "Oh, help!" said Pooh, as a half-dozen angry comments appeared on his screen. "If only I hadn't--" he said, as a dozen even more angry messages turned up in his inbox. "You see, what I meant to do," he explained, as several people unliked his review, "what I meant to do--" "Of course, it was rather--" he admitted, as they all simultaneously unfriended him. "It all comes, I suppose," he decided, as the system administrators closed down his account, "it all comes of liking votes so much. Oh, help!" "But who won?" asked Christopher Robin. "Pooh did, of course!" I replied. "That silly old Heart of Darkness wasn't even in the story, so Pooh won by default." "I thought so too," said Christopher Robin. "I just wanted to be sure."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marvin

    Written for the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament "Oh, Bother!" stated the Pooh-Bear. "What could be the matter, Pooh," Asked Christopher Robin. "Haven't you counted all the bees in the hive and chased all the clouds in the sky?" "Don't quote silly Kenny Loggins songs to me. There's a bigger problem." "Like?..." "Well. Mr. Robin. I'm supposed to fight Hamlet in the Death match semi-final. I was expecting to go mano a bearo with him. But all of a sudden these other Characters are showing up and Written for the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament "Oh, Bother!" stated the Pooh-Bear. "What could be the matter, Pooh," Asked Christopher Robin. "Haven't you counted all the bees in the hive and chased all the clouds in the sky?" "Don't quote silly Kenny Loggins songs to me. There's a bigger problem." "Like?..." "Well. Mr. Robin. I'm supposed to fight Hamlet in the Death match semi-final. I was expecting to go mano a bearo with him. But all of a sudden these other Characters are showing up and messing up my plans. It's a sock puppet orgy." Robin looked a little embarrassed and wondered if the bear was peeking in his window last night, But he continued on. "Why, Pooh. You must look at the positive. Don't you have lots of honey." "Yes" "And you have your friends." "Well, yeah but..." It was that time Tigger, Piglet, and Eyore showed up. Piglet grinned. "That Tolstoy was a wimp. Never worry about Vegans. One look at me and he crumbled." Eyore never looked happy but he was a little less unhappy than usual. "I just gave Alex one kick. He'll be singing Beethoven's Ninth one octave higher for a while." Tigger was the happiest of all. "Wow! That Hamlet was tasty. I haven't had a better meal since my gig with Siegfried and Roy." "See, Pooh? Everyone needs friend. Now you can rest up for the final." And Pooh was happy. The Hundred Acre Wood was a nice place again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Whitaker

    For CELEBRITY DEATH MATCH PURPOSES ONLY: The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh versus Hamlet Scene: Christopher Robin is reading a book. He sighs and throws it down irritably. Pooh: Why Goodfellow Robin, does that book displease you? Christopher Robin: ‘Tis a tedious tome about a prince Troubled by his father’s death. Unnatural Or so it seemed, and he, umanned by it Feigned a double nature to seek revenge. Pooh: Most tedious tome indeed, Goodfellow Robin. Mayhap some hunny might sweeten its For CELEBRITY DEATH MATCH PURPOSES ONLY: The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh versus Hamlet Scene: Christopher Robin is reading a book. He sighs and throws it down irritably. Pooh: Why Goodfellow Robin, does that book displease you? Christopher Robin: ‘Tis a tedious tome about a prince Troubled by his father’s death. Unnatural Or so it seemed, and he, umanned by it Feigned a double nature to seek revenge. Pooh: Most tedious tome indeed, Goodfellow Robin. Mayhap some hunny might sweeten its tone? Christopher Robin: Alas, my tutor hath required me To learn my lessons from this book. And he Will not brook a change of tune to ‘nuther More pleasant to eyes and ears. Childish things He calls them, ill-befitting one as I Who though but eight be half-adult in years. Most out of tune will I sing, counsels he Unless an adult I learn to be. Pooh: So he seeks to adulterate you? It seems a most unnatural thing to desire. Surely a child must be but a child, for what else can he be? Ay, there’s the rub, to be a child or not to be. Come sweet Robin, we go to gather honey and thusly feign to be a bee. Christopher Robin tosses out the book, and goes off to Hundred Acre Wood. Match point: Winnie the Pooh

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jovana Autumn

    I will always return to childrens' books. Fills me up with nostalgia of that time when you remember how everything was more simple and how you were carefree and young. Winne the Pooh is certanly one of the most beloved characters in all of childrens' books and cartoons. I adored him when I was little, I still have a stuffed toy of Eyeore at home(He was my favorite one along with Pooh) but I never got to read a book about him until now and I am glad I finnaly got to it because it was so precious. Th I will always return to childrens' books. Fills me up with nostalgia of that time when you remember how everything was more simple and how you were carefree and young. Winne the Pooh is certanly one of the most beloved characters in all of childrens' books and cartoons. I adored him when I was little, I still have a stuffed toy of Eyeore at home(He was my favorite one along with Pooh) but I never got to read a book about him until now and I am glad I finnaly got to it because it was so precious. There are a lot of deeper analysis circling around the book but for now, I'd like to put that on hold and enjoy the simple and pure feelings that this book has awoken inside of me. Pretty much a 4 or 5 star read, time will tell which one is more fitting to the book for me. And now off I go to some other, bearless book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    For the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament, Heart of Darkness (25) versus The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh (24) After the meal was over, we retired on deck, just at that time when evening succumbs to night, and listened while Marlow spoke of the time he abandoned the wholesome adventures of the salt seas for the convoluted mysteries of the river. As he filled his pipe, I noticed the shake of his hands and looked on his countenance anew. I had never beheld such a visage before, For the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament, Heart of Darkness (25) versus The Complete Tales and Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh (24) After the meal was over, we retired on deck, just at that time when evening succumbs to night, and listened while Marlow spoke of the time he abandoned the wholesome adventures of the salt seas for the convoluted mysteries of the river. As he filled his pipe, I noticed the shake of his hands and looked on his countenance anew. I had never beheld such a visage before, nor since - one which had stared into some dark abyss and emerged alive, yet shaken, defeated to the core. "I embarked at the behest of the Company," he began, "travelling upriver to seek out one in their employ, about whom disturbing reports had begun to be heard. Remember," he said pointedly, fixing us with hollow eyes, "how little explored that region was then. Now, there is, at least, that one map, crudely drawn from memory by that man - Robbins? Robin, maybe? - who spent some years there. We embarked blindly, steaming upriver, the broad expanse at river's mouth giving way inexorably, twisting, narrowing, steadily encroached by trees until we were groping our way through a green, grasping tunnel. For weeks, we spied no native denizens, only glimpsed the occasional rustling of leaves. Several of our number fell to disease, others to despair, but I pushed on, driven to see this benighted voyage to its conclusion. This obsession allowed for no sense of my own personal danger, until, by my calculations almost at my destination, I rounded a bend in the river and beheld a crude structure stretching from one bank to the other, crowded with those same natives who had previously kept themselves scarce. Grotesque, they were, ears elongated and upright or ponderously drooping. Some appeared to have tails, and all were brandishing sticks, which they flung at us, leaving us scrambling for cover. We passed under the bridge, if such was its engineered intent, yet still they flung their sticks, and we heard their mad howls as we steamed onwards, 'Mine's in the lead!' 'No mine!' 'Mine was first!' " Marlow paused and took a deep, shuddering breath before continuing. "I arrived at last at my mission's end. I spied a lone native inhabitant sitting on a stump under a tree, eating God-alone-knew-what. I approached, apprehensive, moving slowly up the path. Still he sat, covered in shabby, threadbare fur. As I reached him, he turned his black, glassy, soulless eyes up to me and rumbled, 'Mister Sanders, he dead. Tiddly pom. ' "

  9. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    Anyone who gives Milne anything less than 5 stars ought to be held down and punched in the head by a horde of small, righteously indignant children.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    CELEBRITY DEATH MATCH REVIEW ONLY We were washing up after tea. Well to be more precise, the crockery was making its own way to the suds in the sink, flying through the air with just the slightest little nose wiggle from Mary. Mary: I have a Halloween face for my bout with fatso, do you like it? Bettie: haha, that'll scare Team Pooh. Seriously though Mary, how DO you rate your chances against Christopher et al, they have a lot going for them in the 'aaaaaaaaw' department. Mary: I have a little somet CELEBRITY DEATH MATCH REVIEW ONLY We were washing up after tea. Well to be more precise, the crockery was making its own way to the suds in the sink, flying through the air with just the slightest little nose wiggle from Mary. Mary: I have a Halloween face for my bout with fatso, do you like it? Bettie: haha, that'll scare Team Pooh. Seriously though Mary, how DO you rate your chances against Christopher et al, they have a lot going for them in the 'aaaaaaaaw' department. Mary: I have a little something up my sleeve. *MP gives that rigid backed and arms folded little smirk* Bettie: As we are alone, I'll tell you something that has always made me smirk. When I was a little girl the name for down there was always known as a Mary, so when I heard Bert sing Jolly Holiday I couldn't stop laughing. *MP clears her throat and brushes away some non-existent lint from the front of her jacket. And was that a slight blush?* Mary: Well my plan is as follows, are you listening!? On my way here I found this: so I said and when the bear is like this... and I'm like this... I shall use it! AND MARY POPPINS WINS AGAIN

  11. 4 out of 5

    Raelee Carpenter

    I mean, Winnie the Pooh... He's my childhood. What can I say? I mean, Winnie the Pooh... He's my childhood. What can I say?

  12. 5 out of 5

    d.a.v.i.d

    What can I say about the Pooh-bear and company that has not been said before? Hmm…That they are Republicans? Marxists? Surfing Sufis? That they emanate from Namibia? Tobago? Sri Lanka? Tijuana? Managua? Rotterdam. Possibly the Forest is really Bacteria, Fungi, in a Petri dish? That he and his friends are symbolic for Minimalism, Wind, Time, Flatulence, Touchdowns, Ben and Jerry’s? Maybe Forest Bedouins in search of…Tents? Water? Malbec? Velasquez Paintings? Contact Lenses? And this Honey business What can I say about the Pooh-bear and company that has not been said before? Hmm…That they are Republicans? Marxists? Surfing Sufis? That they emanate from Namibia? Tobago? Sri Lanka? Tijuana? Managua? Rotterdam. Possibly the Forest is really Bacteria, Fungi, in a Petri dish? That he and his friends are symbolic for Minimalism, Wind, Time, Flatulence, Touchdowns, Ben and Jerry’s? Maybe Forest Bedouins in search of…Tents? Water? Malbec? Velasquez Paintings? Contact Lenses? And this Honey business. Is it really true that Bears like Honey? Or will they eat anything? Or only honeyed viands. Like Baklava. Or Taiglach? Halvah? Or anything unseasoned and unsweetened that is smaller than they are? I am sure, like ‘The Old Man and the Sea’ and ‘Moby Dick,’ there is much that I am unaware of, that they are intentionally allegorical or metaphorical of something, smaller minds like mine cannot decipher? That in real life they are Students at Eton. Janitors from the Japanese Union on Cleanliness? Antecedents of the Sadducees? Member of the Crimean Crew Team? Tennessean’s with Teeth? Avocado Advocates? The Denver Federal Reserve Bank Members? Knights of Columbus? I don’t know. And the Polite Speak? Not where I live. My suspicion is that they may be anagrams, a code for atomic fusion or an Oppenheimer Secret. Or perhaps if the words are read backwards, it will say “Paul is Dead,” or “Kannabis Kills.” To conclude this review, I understand now why my previous ones are generally one sentence long. Too much of a Bad thing is Worse. Or without the Irony, Less is Less. A delightful story. Four Michelin Stars.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    There is very little you can say about this classic book which I suspect has not already been said. Yes I thoroughly enjoyed it being brought up on classics stories of Winnie the Pooh (along with Thomas the Tank Engine and a fair few others). This book is a great collectors hard back edition containing many of the famous stories which Disney turned in to cartoons and now are synonymous with the character. This is a great book to cleanse your reading pallet especially after being immersed in somet There is very little you can say about this classic book which I suspect has not already been said. Yes I thoroughly enjoyed it being brought up on classics stories of Winnie the Pooh (along with Thomas the Tank Engine and a fair few others). This book is a great collectors hard back edition containing many of the famous stories which Disney turned in to cartoons and now are synonymous with the character. This is a great book to cleanse your reading pallet especially after being immersed in something a little more challenging or heavy. No it will not test and challenge your reading but it will leave you with a cosy feeling of nostalgia (okay it did for me) and childhood. Like many books of this type that may not be for all bit I think not only are these stories part of my childhood then also help to remind me that reading has neither boundaries nor requirements if you enjoy a good story it should be available to all

  14. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    I can remember sitting in my closet with a flashlight and these stories as a child more vividly than most memories of the time. As kids we had most of them individually, so this complete collection is soooo nice to have in my library. My Daughter loves these just as much as I did and I hope she passes these time honored stories along to her kids as well. Thank-You Mr. Milne (wherever you are) for shaping my childhood and teaching me that it was ok to have imaginary friends and very strong belief I can remember sitting in my closet with a flashlight and these stories as a child more vividly than most memories of the time. As kids we had most of them individually, so this complete collection is soooo nice to have in my library. My Daughter loves these just as much as I did and I hope she passes these time honored stories along to her kids as well. Thank-You Mr. Milne (wherever you are) for shaping my childhood and teaching me that it was ok to have imaginary friends and very strong belief that it is possible to talk to bears, pigs and tiggers' too!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    A wonderful collection of stories and poems, every single one filled with abundant joy and hilarity. I found every page enticing and witty. This is seriously a wonderful classic that every single person needs in their life. Pooh, Eeyore, Piglet, Roo, Tigger, Kanga, Owl, Rabbit, we’re just wonderful characters. Hilarious and lovable, these characters exhibit great morals such as caring for friends, being brave, etc etc. Anywho, happy reading!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    THIS IS MY JAM (or should I say honey?) Review to come. YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Snapchat @miranda_reads THIS IS MY JAM (or should I say honey?) Review to come. YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Snapchat @miranda_reads

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine

    I do believe A.A. Milne’s, ‘The Complete Tales & Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh’ is one of the very best children’s classics of all time. Who could not resist wanting to live in the Hundred Acre Wood surrounded by such lovable friends. Pooh’s world is what I wish for each & every child, when they close their eyes and enter the world of dreams 🌙💫🎈

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nechet Hudelson

    I’m so glad I own this book for my very own! The older I get, the more I see the whimsical and playful genius written behind these simple stories.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Princess Cordelia

    Such a cute and innocent book. Makes me very nostalgic.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    I had a baby in September, and one of the most difficult things to absorb, in terms of changes in my life, was that I no longer had endless supplies of “me” time. And of course, I say this as a new mother—which means that, if you have not had children (and if you aren’t specifically a mother—sorry but it’s true), you probably don’t know what I mean. I am a person who LOVES books. I thrive on books. And at six weeks post partum I listlessly watched my fourth season of Nip Tuck while the baby went I had a baby in September, and one of the most difficult things to absorb, in terms of changes in my life, was that I no longer had endless supplies of “me” time. And of course, I say this as a new mother—which means that, if you have not had children (and if you aren’t specifically a mother—sorry but it’s true), you probably don’t know what I mean. I am a person who LOVES books. I thrive on books. And at six weeks post partum I listlessly watched my fourth season of Nip Tuck while the baby went through her first growth spurt, while I existed on no more than 2 and ½ hours of consecutive sleep, and I would occasionally TRY, really TRY to turn on my nook at read a page or two of “Sweet Tooth,” and go to bed in despair, knowing would never, ever finish it. And I still haven’t, but one day I will. I will read “Sweet Tooth,” and it will be great. But right now it’s better to accept that things change rather than feel defeated that I can’t have them continue as they were. I have this amazing, beautiful little thing—and she’ll only be this way once! So instead I’ve decided to reshape things a bit and do book reviews in a way that suits me—rather, US—baby and me, NOW. So, it’s a shame “Sweet Tooth,” is off the agenda, but there are other things! So once a month from now on I’ll be adding to my book list and my reviews, but they will most likely be books that baby and I read together. I’ve set up tiny miss baby on a schedule of two naps a day and bedtime by 6:30. If she can keep her eyes open long enough we read for at least 10 minutes before each sleep experience. This month we read “The Complete Tales of Winnie-the-Pooh. My mother’s a huge Milne fan (my older brother is Christopher), and growing up I was in awe of the relationship they had based on her love of these books. The more I read of Milne the more I realize my mother couldn’t have chosen a name with more love and emotion. Christopher, in Milne’s poems and books, is a translation for love entirely. As a fan of Victorian era England, I love much of the subject matter as well—London, Nanny, Mummy and Daddy, bath times and page boys. I also find myself entranced with the relationship between parents and “hired” help who raised the children (yet clearly this is a devoted parent!). I found myself constantly doing Internet research while the baby was otherwise engaged. Did Christopher Robin Milne really have a nanny (yes), and did his father read him the stories he wrote about his son (no)…on and on. In terms of my actual review, I can say the poetry is what I personally find remarkable. “Pinkle Pur, Forgiven, 2 Foxes, Wheezles and Sneezles, The End…” and especially “Vespers,” (which I read as a prayer each night for my own babe before kissing her good night) are some of the most beautifully thought out rhymes I’ve ever known. Each word is painstakingly perfect, and the careful rhyme only makes it better. My daughter’s eyes light up when I pause at the rhyme scheme. At five months she cannot sit up, yet knows something is…coming when I read her the rhymes of Milne. And as for the stories—sweet and complete though they are, I must say I had a terrible time reading them aloud. Milne is the king of run on sentences and comma splices. I’m sure they’ve been proofed and then some, but still, I had a wretched time anticipating who’s voice was who’s—and often Kanga ebbed into Roo, and Pooh sounded sadly like Christopher Robin. I would also be lying if I said my active familial interest in these tales didn’t “keep me going.” I’d imagine many people might find the stories dull, despite their animated forwards by a clearly ahead-of-his time author with a sarcastic, keen wit. But none the less, I got chills when I reached the finish of “The House at Pooh Corner,” to discover “somewhere, a boy and his bear will always be playing,” or that a few chapter themes didn’t seem strangely architipal. Like I said, new mom is a hard hat to wear, despite the clear, glorious benefits involved. But these stories, despite everything, made it seem less like I had given up reading an adult book to placate a baby, and instead felt like I was reading what I might always read, and finally getting the chance to dwell on it all in the best possible way.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Emmeline

    I remember Winnie The Pooh as being the first chapter book that I had ever read with my parents. This book has always been a bittersweet favourite of mine. Mum and Dad would read it to my sister and I on the couch, and we would listen with excited minds and thumbs in our mouths. We would read out of an old yellow hardcover with the full collection of Winnie the Pooh stories. Oh, how I loved and still love those stories! The best word I can think of to describe them is 'enchanting'. Anyone who has I remember Winnie The Pooh as being the first chapter book that I had ever read with my parents. This book has always been a bittersweet favourite of mine. Mum and Dad would read it to my sister and I on the couch, and we would listen with excited minds and thumbs in our mouths. We would read out of an old yellow hardcover with the full collection of Winnie the Pooh stories. Oh, how I loved and still love those stories! The best word I can think of to describe them is 'enchanting'. Anyone who has not read these delightful tales must. Now. It doesn't matter if you're five, or fifteen, or fifty, or a hundred and fifty. Read them. It's wholesome reading for the young, and it's hilarious reading for the old. I would highly suggest it, my dears, as a good old fashioned read aloud. I should stop before I start repeating myself, because I don't really know how to express how much I adore the Winnie the Pooh tales. It's a different type of 'adore' to my love for Narnia or Harry Potter or LOTR; it's a love filled with old memories and dreams and thoughts and imaginings. It's a quaint and quiet and lonesome little love for Winnie the Pooh and Rabbit and Piglet and Kanga and Tigger and WOL and all the rest of them. It's a love filled with memories of playing Pooh Sticks in streams. It's a love filled with careful page turnings of our old yellow hardback that has now left its cover and has loose pages and gorgeous illustrations. It's a love filled with wonderings over how A. A. Milne was allowed to randomly capitalise words in the middle of sentences, and realisations of how those quaint little capitals were a gorgeous way of showing the beauty of words and the imaginations of children. And it's a dear love for the last chapter: In Which Christopher Robin and Pooh come to an Enchanted Place, and We leave them There. The last chapter, the chapter where Christopher Robin grows up, and we grow up a little with him, because it's the End. It's Over. It's Done. And I realise that I don't want to grow up, so I start crying, as I remember how much that last chapter used to confuse me. But Now I understand it. And I don't know if its a good thing or not. Growing up is hard. But Winnie the Pooh helped me to realise that no matter how hard it is or how long it takes, childhood will always be waiting for us, just around the corner, in 100 Acre Wood.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Ah, so that's why Winnie-The-Pooh was my favorite when I was very young. (Of course, I'm sure it helped that I'm Christopher Ronald.) This is the first time I've gone back and read these stories since I became old enough to remember them. Though, you could say, I've yet to actually read them, strictly speaking, since they were read to me by my parents when I was little and this time I listened to Peter Dennis ("the only readings of A.A. Milne's Pooh classics authorized by Milne's son, Christopher Ah, so that's why Winnie-The-Pooh was my favorite when I was very young. (Of course, I'm sure it helped that I'm Christopher Ronald.) This is the first time I've gone back and read these stories since I became old enough to remember them. Though, you could say, I've yet to actually read them, strictly speaking, since they were read to me by my parents when I was little and this time I listened to Peter Dennis ("the only readings of A.A. Milne's Pooh classics authorized by Milne's son, Christopher Robin," we're told in each introduction) read them to me. And, it seems to me, that's as it should be. Reading and listening are two different activities that don't always overlap. Sometimes words that are elegantly eloquent as written on the page trip stumblingly off the tongue and quickly become too convoluted for ears to follow, while oral presentations that astound and amaze can lose all sense of voice and magic once they are transcribed. Finding the realm where the two overlap is a delicate task. It's one that Milne mastered. His stories are as wonderful read as heard, as animated heard as read, and are best when they are both: not simply told, not merely read, but read aloud in shared tellings. The magic of Pooh is that of the simple, young imagination. Many of my favorite books are those that capture the make-believe moments of children, from the beloved egocentricity of Bill Watterson's Calvin and his Hobbes to George and Harold, the boundary-pushing, hero-inventing, comic-book-writing prankster protagonists of Dav Pilkey's Captain Underpants books, to the wildly captured imaginings of Malachai Nicolle in Axe Cop. As different as those more recent stories might seem due to setting and context, they are descendents of Christopher Robin's adventures with Pooh and their friends--they are each a window into the mind of child at play, having fun with imagination and stories. There are many others to choose from, of course, and they are almost always a delight. Milne's Pooh classics are among the best.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    I had no idea I would love this book so much!! It’s sweet, thoughtful, funny, and taps into what kids think about. We absolutely loved the Pooh Bear stories, and I was surprised by how much my girls loved the poems! This will be a staple in bedtime reading!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Crane

    Gorgeous collection of must have Winnie the Pooh stories & poems. Something that children will always treasure I'm sure! Really beautifully presented and just a wonderful addition to our children's library Gorgeous collection of must have Winnie the Pooh stories & poems. Something that children will always treasure I'm sure! Really beautifully presented and just a wonderful addition to our children's library

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joan Winnek

    Timeless. Avoid the Disney illustrations.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hope Elizabeth Anderson (HopelessBookAddict)

    This was so freaking cute. I loved hearing/reading the stories.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paula Vince

    I'd been thinking about re-reading these childhood classics for ages, and discovered a lovely hardback second hand copy, like brand new. It contains both 'Winnie the Pooh' and 'The House at Pooh Corner.' Returning to these little yarns, after however many years, is better than before. I seem to grow more, rather than less fond of the dear little gang from the Hundred Acre Wood. Perhaps it's partly because as adults, we've had more time to recognise spiritual counterparts of each character in our I'd been thinking about re-reading these childhood classics for ages, and discovered a lovely hardback second hand copy, like brand new. It contains both 'Winnie the Pooh' and 'The House at Pooh Corner.' Returning to these little yarns, after however many years, is better than before. I seem to grow more, rather than less fond of the dear little gang from the Hundred Acre Wood. Perhaps it's partly because as adults, we've had more time to recognise spiritual counterparts of each character in ourselves, and our friends, relatives and acquaintances. We can respond to them as archetypes and weave them into our own philosophy. On the surface, the characters are stuffed toys who belonged to a real little boy named Christopher Robin, whose father spun a magical world out of raw material from his son's playroom. My own dad did something similar with the toys in my bedroom when I was a kid, and I love the idea of the same thing happening in the Milne family way back in the 1920's. Stories help the world spin round, and what a lot of wisdom we can glean from reading about these guys, especially in dealing with different personalities types we all come across. I'll start off with the characters I call the 'Brains Triumvirate'. Their influence is hard to resist, but not necessarily as positive as they think. OWL He's the pompous, academically focused guy who looks at the world down his beak and thinks he's above conversing about such things as little cakes with pink sugar icing. He's perfected a wise and thoughtful manner to match his reputation. And he'll always choose the complex and unclear way of getting his message across. Why say, 'It's been raining,' when you can say, 'The atmospheric conditions have been very unfavourable lately'? He's hardly ever spot-on with his accuracy, but it doesn't matter, since those around him believe he's always right whatever he says. He just has that sort of impressive vibe. But we can admire, without having to take on board every hoot he makes. There is such a thing as delusions of grandeur. RABBIT We all know that super busy-body who's forever trying to control and shape his own world, plus those of others. His whole life is made up of important things to do, and he always thinks others need to be changed and improved rather than accepted and left alone. He's the consummate fault-finder, but A. A. Milne has come up with some hilarious tales of Rabbit's plans backfiring, just so young readers can sense that the status quo was fine before he meddled. We can take the interference of organisers like Rabbit with a grain of salt, rather than being instantly swayed by their every gripe. But that includes accepting their choleric, crusader's energy too, since they have a right to stay true to themselves, same as we do. Just be especially aware of personal boundaries once control freaks start jumping in to fix our lives. EEYORE Our gloomy old friend is as cute as a button, but drives me up the wall more than any of the others. Sure he needs compassion, as he can't help having what looks a lot like clinical depression. Yet his many speeches show that his attitude is based on stinking thinking. He's such a self-pitying, sarcastic martyr, who thinks the world revolves around him, and resents it when others don't keep him in the centre of their radars. He's an expert guilt-tripper, with the potential to really cast a pall over a bright day. 'People come and go in this forest and say, "It's only Eeyore," so it doesn't count.' I love it when Rabbit tells him in effect, 'Instead of grumbling that we don't come to you, why don't you pop across to visit us?' Yeah, you tell him, Bunny-boy! Sometimes Rabbit nails it. (Eeyore is also on my list of Famous Comic Grouches.) Now there are other friends, with their own styles, to accept and appreciate, but not necessarily take on board. TIGGER We all have that hyper-active, in-your-face friend who's so wired up, an afternoon with him exhausts us. Whether or not conditions such as ADHD are involved in their inability to sit still, it's truly insensitive on the part of anyone who tries to make them settle down. It takes all sorts of people to make a world, and these guys aren't designed to be sedentary, reflective people. Tiggers shouldn't be medicated, nagged or forced to change in any way, even when the Rabbits of the world try to deflate their energy, and the Eeyore's complain about being 'bounced'. Let's accept them in their exuberant glory without getting too caught up in their bluffing and bluster. They'll get the message that they're too much for some people soon enough, without us adding to it. KANGA & ROO Hmm, conflicting feelings here. On one hand, I love how Milne has liberated the noble role of motherhood through his only female character. It really is a big deal, that requires a multi-juggling act of sensitivity, practical wisdom, hard work and eyes at the back of your head. Kanga would never demur, 'I'm just a mum,' and I applaud that. But on the other hand, she's shown to have no outside interests beyond that all-consuming lifestyle. Kanga turns a deaf ear to Owl's academic lecturing and Pooh's artistic poetry reciting alike. She's not remotely interested, just because she has a little kid to raise. Come on A.A. Milne, that's not all motherhood is all about! We do have interests outside of our family roles, and crave mental stimulation beyond nappies and cleaning cloths. But I guess 1926 wasn't the era to show women as multi-faceted individuals, especially in children's books. Has the question of why she was a single parent occurred to anyone else? Where was Mr Kangaroo? Roo's dad never gets a single mention. Was Kanga widowed, divorced? Did he just leave them, or was it she who decided she'd had enough? No doubt I'm way overthinking this, and the simple answer, of course, is that Christopher Robin only had the mother and joey toys in his playroom. Now for the heart-warming best buddy duo. PIGLET This little chap keeps looking at the size and scope of the big wide world, getting overwhelmed because there is so much out there that might be a threat. 'It's hard to be brave when you're such a very small animal.' Yeah, I hear you, mate. Before we know it, those heffalumps and woozles we invent in our imaginations have taken over every waking moment, making us permanently edgy with terror. At this stage, we are beyond reasoning that they aren't necessarily even real. But one of the best things little Piglet has going for him is a best buddy who unconsciously encourages him to trust that at its core, the world is an interesting, friendly place. POOH BEAR Now, three cheers for our chubby hero! He's a cute and cuddly reminder to acknowledge and embrace our quirky strengths, instead of listening to the many voices that might interpret them as weaknesses instead. He never lets simple moments of contentment slide past unnoticed. He'll always say yes to both honey and condensed milk, and the only time he's been known to go on a diet is when he needed to lose the weight to get unstuck from Rabbit's front door. Perhaps he's a bit of a glutton with no will-power to boast of, but he knows he has a stocky build anyway and doesn't get tied in knots about it. Besides, as J.K. Rowling has now famously said, there are worse things to be than fat. Not only does he never waste a moment of genuine contentment, but he'll also perform a bit of Pooh Bear alchemy, and use his simple magic to spin potentially boring and unpleasant moments into even more contentment. Humming, composing poetry, and drifting into amusing reveries is a way of life for him. I used to be paid out by school teachers for daydreaming, so he's one of my favourite role models! It would be easy for Pooh to let the Brains triumvirate make him feel inferior, and he even calls himself a Bear of Little Brain. Who really needs fanciful daydreams, and wordy creativity, in a world full of facts to be discovered and changes to implement? Isn't moseying along on leisurely strolls a waste of time, when others are busy making an impact in the world? Thankfully, he's taken time to step back and reflect that even though he'll never be a cutting edge, smart type of guy, it suits him more to pursue a simple minded sort of happiness than fill his life with complex, clever misery. Not that the others are miserable (well, except for Eeyore), but their way different personality styles make them happy in other ways. And Pooh's style, lived largely in his own head, is a valid option. He won't ever get the broad scope of Owl's general knowledge, or Rabbit's particular satisfaction of being able to sit back and see the results of his labour. But what Pooh has is just as special. However inferior it may appear to those who profess to know better, it is a genuinely delightful trait which the likes of Owl and Rabbit miss out on without ever knowing. So in honour of our hero, I'll encourage us all to hopefully drift into some comfortable dreams when we head off, for he tells us it's when we are humble and unpretentious that friendly hums can get hold of us. Pooh knows the creative life is often surprisingly different to what we think it'll be like, but still most satisfactory. Let's take his example to heart, and not care overly much what others may think of us, as long as we know we're harming nobody and having fun. 'When you're a Bear of very little brain, and you think of things, you find sometimes that a thing which seemed very thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out in the open and has other people looking at it.' Perhaps making peace with this fact is the secret of a satisfying, tranquil life.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bookteafull (Danny)

    Im no longer rating children's novels unless they're, like, horrendous. Decided to read The Complete Tales of Winnie the Pooh after watching the movie Christopher Robin and bawling my eyes out. Pooh and his 100 Acre Wood crew will always have a special place in my heart - my sister and I had a Winnie the Pooh and Tigger bedroom and snow globes growing up, my sister has a Winnie the Pooh tattoo, and our mother would read us Milne stories at bedtime. These stories be bringing back all the feels. Im no longer rating children's novels unless they're, like, horrendous. Decided to read The Complete Tales of Winnie the Pooh after watching the movie Christopher Robin and bawling my eyes out. Pooh and his 100 Acre Wood crew will always have a special place in my heart - my sister and I had a Winnie the Pooh and Tigger bedroom and snow globes growing up, my sister has a Winnie the Pooh tattoo, and our mother would read us Milne stories at bedtime. These stories be bringing back all the feels.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shari

    This was very cute and wholesome to read every night with my two daughters. They love Winnie the Pooh and all of his friends! There are so many beautiful quotes about friendship, love and life in these stories that make adults think as well.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris Gager

    Rescued this one a while back. It's in good shape except for overall curve/bend in it. Moisture? Humidity? Anyway, this edition is from 1996. The awesome illustrations have been colorized. No opinion on that from me as I am not a big fan. Medium fan? Trivia questions will follow ... Moving along and enjoying it, especially the colorized illustrations. The text is a bit on the twee side for an adult I suppose. Finished with the WTP part of the book and will stop there. The rest of the book contains Rescued this one a while back. It's in good shape except for overall curve/bend in it. Moisture? Humidity? Anyway, this edition is from 1996. The awesome illustrations have been colorized. No opinion on that from me as I am not a big fan. Medium fan? Trivia questions will follow ... Moving along and enjoying it, especially the colorized illustrations. The text is a bit on the twee side for an adult I suppose. Finished with the WTP part of the book and will stop there. The rest of the book contains other and similar children's literature by AAM.

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