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Eating Fire, Tasting Blood: An Anthology of the American Indian Holocaust

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As you walk out of your front door tomorrow morning, look down. Look to your left and to your right. Touch the earth: the concrete, the sidewalk, or whatever surrounds you. Undoubtedly you will be touching the layered coverings of the remains of indigenous peoples. Not arrowheads, not broken pieces of pottery — but the very DNA of the first peoples of this continent. For f As you walk out of your front door tomorrow morning, look down. Look to your left and to your right. Touch the earth: the concrete, the sidewalk, or whatever surrounds you. Undoubtedly you will be touching the layered coverings of the remains of indigenous peoples. Not arrowheads, not broken pieces of pottery — but the very DNA of the first peoples of this continent. For five centuries — from Columbus's arrival in 1492 to the U.S. Army's massacre of Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in the 1890s, to the renewed assault in the 1970s — our continent's indigenous people endured the most massive and systematic act of genocide in the history of the world. In Eating Fire, Tasting Blood, twenty established and up-and-coming American Indian writers from disparate nations and tribes offer stirring reflections on the history of their people. This is not a collection of essays about Native Americans but rather a collection BY Native Americans — the story of native holocaust on a tribe-by-tribe level as told by those few who have been fortunate enough to survive. Included are original essays by Vine Deloria Jr., Paula Gunn Allen, Linda Hogan, and Eduardo Galeano.


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As you walk out of your front door tomorrow morning, look down. Look to your left and to your right. Touch the earth: the concrete, the sidewalk, or whatever surrounds you. Undoubtedly you will be touching the layered coverings of the remains of indigenous peoples. Not arrowheads, not broken pieces of pottery — but the very DNA of the first peoples of this continent. For f As you walk out of your front door tomorrow morning, look down. Look to your left and to your right. Touch the earth: the concrete, the sidewalk, or whatever surrounds you. Undoubtedly you will be touching the layered coverings of the remains of indigenous peoples. Not arrowheads, not broken pieces of pottery — but the very DNA of the first peoples of this continent. For five centuries — from Columbus's arrival in 1492 to the U.S. Army's massacre of Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in the 1890s, to the renewed assault in the 1970s — our continent's indigenous people endured the most massive and systematic act of genocide in the history of the world. In Eating Fire, Tasting Blood, twenty established and up-and-coming American Indian writers from disparate nations and tribes offer stirring reflections on the history of their people. This is not a collection of essays about Native Americans but rather a collection BY Native Americans — the story of native holocaust on a tribe-by-tribe level as told by those few who have been fortunate enough to survive. Included are original essays by Vine Deloria Jr., Paula Gunn Allen, Linda Hogan, and Eduardo Galeano.

50 review for Eating Fire, Tasting Blood: An Anthology of the American Indian Holocaust

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    Thought-provoking and insightful, this collection of essays took me by surprise. I was not expecting such a diverse collection of genres, ranging from poetry and personal memoir to scholarly sociological studies. Full disclosure - I did not read all of every essay. Some were a little thick for me, considering I was more interested in the personal stories. However, this collection had something for everyone. If you are at all interested in an alternate view of the American history you learned in Thought-provoking and insightful, this collection of essays took me by surprise. I was not expecting such a diverse collection of genres, ranging from poetry and personal memoir to scholarly sociological studies. Full disclosure - I did not read all of every essay. Some were a little thick for me, considering I was more interested in the personal stories. However, this collection had something for everyone. If you are at all interested in an alternate view of the American history you learned in school, this book is highly recommended!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bart

    Some essays in Marijo Moore's anthology are really insightful and taught me quite a bit about the (past/present) American Indian holocaust. Many of the other pieces are boring (poetry) or shallow. Most of the essays that lack depth do have critical analysis on many issues; however, there are some issues - romanticization of indigenous life, matriarchy, and the Jewish Holocaust - that authors consistently bring up with weak or no critiques. Some authors romanticize indigenous life to a point of et Some essays in Marijo Moore's anthology are really insightful and taught me quite a bit about the (past/present) American Indian holocaust. Many of the other pieces are boring (poetry) or shallow. Most of the essays that lack depth do have critical analysis on many issues; however, there are some issues - romanticization of indigenous life, matriarchy, and the Jewish Holocaust - that authors consistently bring up with weak or no critiques. Some authors romanticize indigenous life to a point of ethnocentrism and make outlandish claims that the authors refute in the same essay, such as Europeans causing indigenous groups to no longer be peaceful and later admitting that some groups were traditionally enemies before whites arrived on the continent! Moore labels one section "Matriarchy" and a few authors discuss indigenous cultures as matriarchal before contact with European cultures. Their descriptions actually describe matrilineal and matrilocal societies not matriarchal. A few of the authors somewhat trivialize the Jewish Holocaust in their comparisons of it to the American Indian Holocaust. Ridiculous! Moore, also, orders the essays in sections with no explanations on the sections or why essays are in those sections.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Fei

    Some of the beginning essays were very academic and dry, but the latter few, esp the ones about women's lives, were much more personal. I think it's overall an important read for Americans but it can be emotionally difficult to get through at times. Some of the beginning essays were very academic and dry, but the latter few, esp the ones about women's lives, were much more personal. I think it's overall an important read for Americans but it can be emotionally difficult to get through at times.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    This is a must-read for anyone who lives in North America. It addresses everything American history books have omitted.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    some of these narratives were not interesting at all and the ones that were well written or intriguing were much too short

  6. 5 out of 5

    Camila Marquez

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  8. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

  9. 5 out of 5

    River

  10. 4 out of 5

    Drucilla

  11. 5 out of 5

    Todd Zimmer

  12. 4 out of 5

    ael

  13. 5 out of 5

    Matt Bean

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ce

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aziza Mehmoudzai

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ed

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  19. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Patterson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Trace Lara Hentz

  21. 5 out of 5

    Camille

  22. 5 out of 5

    Angela Gebhardt

  23. 4 out of 5

    Julia Ward

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kim

  25. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marcie

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  30. 5 out of 5

    Darwin

  31. 4 out of 5

    Waldtochter

  32. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  33. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Husom

  34. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  35. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

  36. 4 out of 5

    Mcrc

  37. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

  38. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  39. 4 out of 5

    Angie

  40. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

  41. 4 out of 5

    Brad N

  42. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  43. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  44. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  45. 4 out of 5

    Sashenka

  46. 4 out of 5

    Billy

  47. 5 out of 5

    Arielle

  48. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

  49. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  50. 4 out of 5

    Asam Ahmad

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