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Black Protest and the Great Migration: A Brief History with Documents

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During World War I, as many as half a million southern African Americans permanently left the South to create new homes and lives in the urban North, and hundreds of thousands more would follow in the 1920s. This dramatic transformation in the lives of many black Americans involved more than geography: the increasingly visible “New Negro” and the intensification of grassro During World War I, as many as half a million southern African Americans permanently left the South to create new homes and lives in the urban North, and hundreds of thousands more would follow in the 1920s. This dramatic transformation in the lives of many black Americans involved more than geography: the increasingly visible “New Negro” and the intensification of grassroots black activism in the South as well as the North were the manifestations of a new challenge to racial subordination. Eric Arnesen’s unique collection of articles from a variety of northern, southern, black, and white newspapers, magazines, and books explores the “Great Migration,” focusing on the economic, social, and political conditions of the Jim Crow South, the meanings of race in general — and on labor in particular — in the urban North, the grassroots movements of social protest that flourished in the war years, and the postwar “racial counterrevolution.” An introduction by the editor, headnotes to documents, a chronology, questions for consideration, a bibliography, and an index are included.


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During World War I, as many as half a million southern African Americans permanently left the South to create new homes and lives in the urban North, and hundreds of thousands more would follow in the 1920s. This dramatic transformation in the lives of many black Americans involved more than geography: the increasingly visible “New Negro” and the intensification of grassro During World War I, as many as half a million southern African Americans permanently left the South to create new homes and lives in the urban North, and hundreds of thousands more would follow in the 1920s. This dramatic transformation in the lives of many black Americans involved more than geography: the increasingly visible “New Negro” and the intensification of grassroots black activism in the South as well as the North were the manifestations of a new challenge to racial subordination. Eric Arnesen’s unique collection of articles from a variety of northern, southern, black, and white newspapers, magazines, and books explores the “Great Migration,” focusing on the economic, social, and political conditions of the Jim Crow South, the meanings of race in general — and on labor in particular — in the urban North, the grassroots movements of social protest that flourished in the war years, and the postwar “racial counterrevolution.” An introduction by the editor, headnotes to documents, a chronology, questions for consideration, a bibliography, and an index are included.

30 review for Black Protest and the Great Migration: A Brief History with Documents

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Licata

    I knew next to nothing about the Great Migration of southern black Americans to the north. This subject must have been addressed in high school history class, probably on the same day as Japanese internment and the "trail of tears," and I was absent that day. Thanks to Eric Arnesen and all the contributors to Black Protest and the Great Migration I am learning about this mass movement of people and the impact on both the north and the south. This book is full of surprising facts like "the 19th A I knew next to nothing about the Great Migration of southern black Americans to the north. This subject must have been addressed in high school history class, probably on the same day as Japanese internment and the "trail of tears," and I was absent that day. Thanks to Eric Arnesen and all the contributors to Black Protest and the Great Migration I am learning about this mass movement of people and the impact on both the north and the south. This book is full of surprising facts like "the 19th Amendment may have granted women the right to vote, but it did not guarantee that African American women could actually vote in the South. Although black Americans' voter registration increased during World War II, it was only with the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act that black Americans voting rights were effectively protected by the federal government." One hundred years after the Civil War -- amazing...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Raquel

    This book is a good overview of the age of Black migration. I had to read it for a college American History course and then write an essay on it. The letters and primary documents were both very informative and quite entertaining.

  3. 4 out of 5

    vittore paleni

    Great illuminating book. The sources are very helpful in understanding the relevant and concurrent primary first hand accounts of the historical event.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erik Bauer

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid Ramirez

  6. 4 out of 5

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  7. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis Mcclinton

  8. 5 out of 5

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    Sole Marron

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  11. 4 out of 5

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  12. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  13. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Glanowski

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maritza

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ricardo Rodriguez

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Grossi

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brittney

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  19. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brianna

  21. 5 out of 5

    Macario

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jianming Bing

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katie E

  24. 4 out of 5

    James Hill Welborn III

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wadzi

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  27. 4 out of 5

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  28. 4 out of 5

    Paul Davis

  29. 5 out of 5

    Luisana Armendáriz

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lacey Wilson

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