web site hit counter The Map of Time - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Map of Time

Availability: Ready to download

This rollicking page-turner with a cast of real and imagined literary characters and cunning intertwined plots stars a skeptical H.G. Wells as a time-traveling investigator. Characters real and imaginary come vividly to life in this whimsical triple play of intertwined plots, in which a skeptical H. G. Wells is called upon to investigate purported incidents of time travel a This rollicking page-turner with a cast of real and imagined literary characters and cunning intertwined plots stars a skeptical H.G. Wells as a time-traveling investigator. Characters real and imaginary come vividly to life in this whimsical triple play of intertwined plots, in which a skeptical H. G. Wells is called upon to investigate purported incidents of time travel and to save lives and literary classics, including Dracula and The Time Machine, from being wiped from existence. What happens if we change history?


Compare

This rollicking page-turner with a cast of real and imagined literary characters and cunning intertwined plots stars a skeptical H.G. Wells as a time-traveling investigator. Characters real and imaginary come vividly to life in this whimsical triple play of intertwined plots, in which a skeptical H. G. Wells is called upon to investigate purported incidents of time travel a This rollicking page-turner with a cast of real and imagined literary characters and cunning intertwined plots stars a skeptical H.G. Wells as a time-traveling investigator. Characters real and imaginary come vividly to life in this whimsical triple play of intertwined plots, in which a skeptical H. G. Wells is called upon to investigate purported incidents of time travel and to save lives and literary classics, including Dracula and The Time Machine, from being wiped from existence. What happens if we change history?

30 review for The Map of Time

  1. 5 out of 5

    Velma

    Time travel! Jack the Ripper! Automatons! What's not to love?!? Well, as it turns out, almost everything. I know everyone else here is raving about it, but I could barely stomach The Map of Time; it took every ounce of stick-to-it-iveness I could muster to get through this convoluted, interminable literary maze. WHERE, I ask you, was the EDITOR in this hot mess? There is the kernal of a potentially good story here, had about 2/3 of the fat been excised. The only way it could have been more byzant Time travel! Jack the Ripper! Automatons! What's not to love?!? Well, as it turns out, almost everything. I know everyone else here is raving about it, but I could barely stomach The Map of Time; it took every ounce of stick-to-it-iveness I could muster to get through this convoluted, interminable literary maze. WHERE, I ask you, was the EDITOR in this hot mess? There is the kernal of a potentially good story here, had about 2/3 of the fat been excised. The only way it could have been more byzantine is if Nancy Grace had shown up to interrogate Inspector Lusk about the Ripper murders. It's not like the guy can't write. He's a decent, if grandiose, storyteller and he mimics to perfection the florid style of the period he set this novel in. And the theme Palma writes about -- choice and the Butterfly Effect of exercising it -- is one that is both powerful and personal. Plus, he knows how to turn a phrase: "...loneliness that sticks to him like a birthmark." But come on, Félix, enough with the meandering, the inconsistencies, the convenient last-minute reprieves for waylaid story-lines. And the unnecessary reminders from the narrator about his omniscience have to go. I was all set to love this book, what with it being about the re-writing of the history of the earliest science fiction and all, but it wasn't to be. The one good thing that came out of it? It inspired me to read the original H.G. Wells' The Time Machine, and it was love at first sight. This ARC was provided to me by the publisher via my local Indie bookstore, and no money was exchanged.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I was so excited to get this book - the back flap suggests a Jasper Ffordian adventure starring H.G. Wells. However... not so much. This novel is in three parts, only lightly interwoven. One of those threads is H.G. Wells, another is Gilliam Murray and his Trip to the Year 2000. The author has written this as a pastiche of Victorian novels, filled with digressions, overly adjectived, and a tad rambling. Part One is the story of Andrew, an upper-middle class boy who falls in love with a beautiful I was so excited to get this book - the back flap suggests a Jasper Ffordian adventure starring H.G. Wells. However... not so much. This novel is in three parts, only lightly interwoven. One of those threads is H.G. Wells, another is Gilliam Murray and his Trip to the Year 2000. The author has written this as a pastiche of Victorian novels, filled with digressions, overly adjectived, and a tad rambling. Part One is the story of Andrew, an upper-middle class boy who falls in love with a beautiful whore, Mary Kelly. Their relationship progresses to the point where Andrew announces his love for her to his father and promptly gets disinherited. Lost, he wanders back to her home/hovel, only to arrive minutes after Jack the Ripper has visited his fifth victim. Eight years later he's prepared to kill himself in that same room, until his cousin Charles, with the help of Mr. Murray and Mr. Wells, convinces him that by traveling through time he has saved Mary. Part Two is set in Murray's Time Traveling fraud, with a young, bored woman taking the trip to the year 2000 only to fall in love with the Savior of the Human Race, Derek Shackleton. Derek - aka Tom - falls in love with her, too; back in the "present day" they spend one night and several passionate letters declaring their love (Tom's letters are written by Wells). Part Three finds us contemplating three murders, committed with some weapon unknown to the era. Scotland Yard's detective has decided that the only possible suspect is Mr. Shackleton and convinces his superiors to allow him to travel to the year 2000 to arrest Shackleton. Murray, afraid his huge hoax will be discovered, convinces Wells to find the real killer... and thus commences a very complicated, confusing explanation of time travel, the Library of Truth and other things, as Wells tries to prevent The Invisible Man from being published by the supposed murderer (who will also kill Bram Stoker and Henry James, stealing Dracula and The Turn of the Screw). This is the least comprehensible part of the book, with what appears to be three time travelers, including one claiming to be Wells-of-the-future, running around. Had the book focused on Part Three, with less rushing around and more mystery, I would have enjoyed it far more. However, the jacket flap also says that this is an International Sensation, so what do I know? ARC provided by publisher.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Traci

    The less said about this book the better. Do you enjoy magic tricks even though it's all sleight of hand? Can you simply enjoy the construction of a novel? I loved every moment I spent with this new and talented author. A little bit of The Prestige, some Neil Gaiman, completely original. I'm not even sure where to put this title. Fantasy? Fiction? Science Fiction? Steampunk? It's all of these. One of the best, and one of my favorites, of the year. Beautifully written. The less said about this book the better. Do you enjoy magic tricks even though it's all sleight of hand? Can you simply enjoy the construction of a novel? I loved every moment I spent with this new and talented author. A little bit of The Prestige, some Neil Gaiman, completely original. I'm not even sure where to put this title. Fantasy? Fiction? Science Fiction? Steampunk? It's all of these. One of the best, and one of my favorites, of the year. Beautifully written.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marian

    I hated it. I hated the cliched, overwrought, terrible writing, I hated the conceit of the omniscient narrator/author who breaks in to speak directly the reader, I hated the characters. None of the characters are sympathetic or even interesting. The cast is divided into unlikable liars, and the pathetic, unrealistically stupid people who believe them. The only exception is the character of HG Wells, whom the author uses to smugly whine about how hard it is to write fantasy/sci-fi. It's insuffera I hated it. I hated the cliched, overwrought, terrible writing, I hated the conceit of the omniscient narrator/author who breaks in to speak directly the reader, I hated the characters. None of the characters are sympathetic or even interesting. The cast is divided into unlikable liars, and the pathetic, unrealistically stupid people who believe them. The only exception is the character of HG Wells, whom the author uses to smugly whine about how hard it is to write fantasy/sci-fi. It's insufferable. Also, the plot sucks. Here's an example of the writing: "...and yet at the same time this mysterious woman possessed a charm as unmistakable as it was elusive. HE was unsure exactly what it was that captivated him about her. It might have been the contrast between her frail appearance and the strength radiating from her gaze; a gaze he had never seen before in any of his conquests, a wild determined gaze that retained a glimmer of youthful innocence. It was as if every day the woman was forced to confront the ugliness of life, and yet even so, curled up in her bed at night in the dark, she still believed it was only a regrettable figment of her imagination, a bad dream that would soon dissolve and give way to a more pleasant reality. It was the gaze of a person who yearns for something and refuses to believe it will never be hers, because hope is the only thing she has left." OH MY GOD IT'S SO BAD. AND THE BOOK IS 600 PAGES LONG.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Frances

    Rollicking Good Fun! Until I was several chapters into this book I was beginning to wonder if I wanted to continue. At times I groaned while reading, sometimes smiled, and often stopped to ponder certain paragraphs. It was a story of many things; imaginative, different, strange, but yet, soon became compelling enough to finish. When I finally read the last page, I felt I had been thoroughly entertained and pleased to have read such a creative and unique book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Luanne Ollivier

    Do you ever start a book , get a few pages in, recognize that you are inextricably hooked already and jump for joy when you realize there are 600 more pages left to savour? That's exactly how I felt after the first two chapters of Félix J. Palma's novel The Map of Time. It started off in one of my favourite time periods - Victorian England - with an unknown narrator telling us of a young man's visit to Whitechapel in 1888- the time of Jack the Ripper - and more. "Yes, I know that when I began this Do you ever start a book , get a few pages in, recognize that you are inextricably hooked already and jump for joy when you realize there are 600 more pages left to savour? That's exactly how I felt after the first two chapters of Félix J. Palma's novel The Map of Time. It started off in one of my favourite time periods - Victorian England - with an unknown narrator telling us of a young man's visit to Whitechapel in 1888- the time of Jack the Ripper - and more. "Yes, I know that when I began this tale, I promised there would be a fabulous time machine, and there will be, there will even be intrepid explorers and fierce native tribes - a must in any adventure story. But all in good time, isn't it necessary at the start of any game to place all the pieces on their respective squares first? Of course it is, in which case let me continue setting up the board, slowly but surely..." At the heart of it all - Murray's Time Travel. Could the fourth dimension really have been discovered in 1896? ..."what was underneath the world, what was behind reality." Can the Murray Company really take travellers to the year 2000? All of Victorian England would like to believe so. Jules Verne and H.G. Wells and their futuristic novels are all the rage. H. G. Wells plays a prominent role in this tale, as well as other historical figures including the Elephant Man, Henry James, Bram Stoker. Palma creates many other characters, all incredibly well drawn, leaping off the page and into my imagination with ease. The book is written in three parts, with each part approaching time travel from a slightly different angle, with the third part tying it altogether. But not tying it all up with a neat little bow, for Palma plays with us many times throughout the 600+ pages. We are kept on our toes, wondering if time travel was/is possible.... There is no way to pigeonhole this book into any one genre. It is incredibly imaginative, ingenious, whimsical and addictive, combining history, mystery, romance, adventure and fantasy into a page turning, clever, keep you on your toes, thought provoking tale. What would you do if you could go back in the past or see what's coming in the future? Palma is an absolutely fantastic storyteller. I was captured from first page to last. For those who are looking for something completely different, pick up The Map of Time, releasing today.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cortney

    This book was a big disappointment to me. The cover, the synopses, the reviews all had me ready to read a book about the mysteries of time travel. Instead, set in late Victorian era London "The Map of Time" gives readers a bit of a love story, a bit of mystery, a bit of science fiction, even a bit of biography, but it fails to fully develop any of these aspects and left me feeling cheated on all fronts. Palma does a fine job of setting the Victorian stage. Historical fiction lovers will gobble up This book was a big disappointment to me. The cover, the synopses, the reviews all had me ready to read a book about the mysteries of time travel. Instead, set in late Victorian era London "The Map of Time" gives readers a bit of a love story, a bit of mystery, a bit of science fiction, even a bit of biography, but it fails to fully develop any of these aspects and left me feeling cheated on all fronts. Palma does a fine job of setting the Victorian stage. Historical fiction lovers will gobble up references to locations, people, and current events that almost disrupt the flow of the story by being too frequent and without impetus. The writing itself is Victorian in flavor with a flowery prose and the faux pas of author intrusion, which I found distracting. Other than that I find the book difficult to sum up or review because it's just not cohesive. Divided into three stories it relies on common characters, mainly the character of H. G. Wells, and the concept of time travel, to make it into one, but it just feels like the author is attempting too many things. There are hints throughout the book of a greater discussion—a deeper meaning—but the allegory is left incomplete. References to class discrepancy, gender issues, and colonialism are present but never expounded on and leave the reader hanging. And if I started enjoying the book in the last 50 pages I can only say that I wish the first 500 had been so engaging. Some people will really like this book, and for a light read it isn't bad, I just can't give it a rave review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Review originally posted here: http://pocketfulofbooksblogger.blogsp... I think this book was written just to annoy me. I am sitting here with 5 pages of notes which I made whilst reading it that detail approximately one hundred reasons why I detested it from the first page to the last and why my boyfriend was forced to read some parts aloud to me because I became physically unable to finish it without assistance...my impulse to put it down was just too strong. But I did it. And now I am going to Review originally posted here: http://pocketfulofbooksblogger.blogsp... I think this book was written just to annoy me. I am sitting here with 5 pages of notes which I made whilst reading it that detail approximately one hundred reasons why I detested it from the first page to the last and why my boyfriend was forced to read some parts aloud to me because I became physically unable to finish it without assistance...my impulse to put it down was just too strong. But I did it. And now I am going to have to tell you why it is awful. This isn't going to be pretty. -Here are the Top Ten Reasons Why I Hated This Book- 1. Firstly, I HATED the narrator. He occasionally provides voice of God insights which persistently interferes with the story. It was utterly infuriating. When things were happening, this unexplained and un-bodied voice would come out of nowhere with such gems as, 'this part is very boring so I'll spare you the details...' No THAT was very boring and you should have spared me THAT. The voice is no-one. It is just the writer. Using a shoddy plot device to conceal bad writing. It doesn't work. 2. Figures of speech and cliche are used constantly. Wrongly in most cases too. They are usually completely inappropriate considering the context they are used in and the phrases that are said were probably never used in Victorian times anyway. One the author loves is 'he felt a shiver down his spine'...I counted 6 uses of that alone. One is too many. Metaphors and similies are also employed pretty much every single paragraph, for example, 'the immense greenhouse was as graceful as a swan poised for flight'. HOW CAN A GREENHOUSE BE GRACEFUL?! 3. AM I SUPPOSED TO LIKE THESE CHARACTERS? They are horrible, shallow, awful people. The story kicks off with two cousins- Andrew and Charles- who are spoilt brat rich kids who whine about their parents. Charles is basically Lord Henry from 'A Picture of Dorian Gray'; he is decadent and smarmy but without the charm, wit and charisma that Lord Henry is imbued with. Andrew is spineless, pathetic and preposterously brooding. Apparently when he leaves the house he 'gazes at the moon for several minutes' and he 'watches a rose wilt in his hands'. Yeah those are really quotes. This is what I am dealing with. We are supposed to sympathise with these characters; people who regularly, by their own confession, go out and use women and are not ashamed in the slightest, in fact they find it highly amusing. I don't. 4. The characters (and author) are too aware that they are trying to portray Victorian times. No one, while living in the time that they live in, looks around and says things like 'Ah yes I and my surroundings are an example of my time...look at the rigid boundaries we Victorian people have and how strange the things we do are like wearing corsets and carrying parasols'. No one actually thinks like that at the time- you are submerged in your own culture and you think you are the pinnacle of civilisation; Victorians didn't think they were old-fashioned that is just us projecting and comparing our time onto theirs. This really, really irritated me as you were never submerged in Victorian times and there is absolutely no atmosphere whatsoever. The whole marketing of the book is centered on the Victorian aspect but it completely fails. 5. All of the references to historical figures from the Victorian era are so forced that it is cringey to read. It feels like the author just wrote about them with Wikipedia open and used the facts he found there to structure whole chapters. There is one chapter that is basically H.G Wells' autobiography; Wells just dumps huge chunks of explanation about his life and works like, 'this author wrote this book in this year, which I then read and then decided to write my book in this year on this day.' It's so unnecessary and feels completely amateurish. 6. OK this is what REALLY got to me about this book; the portrayal of women. Wells cheats on his wife because, and get this, she is a mechanical, cold, baby-making machine who is 'unsuited to pleasure', so cheating on her is the answer to solve poor H.G Well's inability to have sex with her because of her incurable and unfair 'frigidity' (actual quotes). Yep he has 'solved it' by sleeping with another woman who he later leaves his wife for. AND WE ARE SUPPOSED TO SYMPATHISE WITH WELLS IN THIS INSTANCE. GAH! His new wife, who asks visitors to tea, is described as showing 'the practical nature of her sex'. THANKS FOR THE COMPLIMENT FELIX PALMER. Nothing like an offensive mass generalisation of an entire gender to keep me reading. Claire Haggerty, the main character in the middle section of the book, is described negatively as 'an impregnable fortress' and 'not of good breeding stock'. Yeah OK, the author has tried to make her seem like a liberated woman because she doesn't care for marriage and babies and is logical rather than silly, but then he is also saying she is the EXCEPTION. Most women are crazy baby-makers so let's find the one who isn't and write a book about her. Also, in one sentence she says that marriage is 'legal prostitution', and then in the next she is talking of, 'a romantic passion to which she longed to surrender herself.' And when she does have sex, she actually enjoys it (OMG WOMEN CAN ENJOY SEX) and this is considered by the men in the novel to be a miraculous event. Wells's wife barely omits a 'polite sigh' when he sexes her, so he obviously needs to leave the description of Claire's enjoyment of sex out on the counter for her so she can become more 'sexually liberated' you know...and scream and pull his hair and fake an orgasm probably. The problem can't be that he is rubbish in bed...noo it must be that his wife is frigid. Yeah makes sense. Claire's sex scene is an abomination. It is a description of a low budget porn film in which the woman fakes it...but the author probably believes it's real. Claire is a virgin. She is TRICKED into losing her virginity to a man in a cheap guesthouse who she thinks is someone else and by the end of it she is a 'quivering wreck' because it is sooo pleasurable; she feels like 'a harp would when it's strings are plucked for the first time'. She screams, she hair pulls, she is in ecstasy. Because that is what losing your virginity is like. It is tender and you have an epiphany as to how much pleasure the human body can feel. YEAH THAT IS WHAT IT'S LIKE. Later on in the novel the guy who she slept with, thinking he was someone else, the guy who TRICKED her to get her into bed, goes back to her and there is no explanation. End of story. Soo...did she find out who he was? Is she angry that some guy tricked her into losing her virginity? That he got H.G Wells to write love letters for him and pretend he wrote them? We never know because apparently it doesn't matter. Apparently true love is so magical that none of that would matter to her...even though her love is based on absolutely NOTHING but lies. Women will do anything for love after all. Another thing that bothered me about it was that later on, when reflecting upon it, the man in question refers to Claire's vagina as a 'terrifying entity' and, wait for it cause this is the worst and most horrible description I have ever heard of ANYTHING EVER, 'a sucking orifice'. Those are actually words written together in a novel that has been published. This novel goes by the whole FALSE premise that Victorian women were scared of sex and frigid and everyone was much too prim and proper to discuss it. NOT TRUE. Just as in any society, sexuality was a huge business in the Victorian era. I hate this quote from Claire, 'In my own time, girls are brought up to repress their instincts, especially in well-to-do families like mine. Unfortunately, it is widely believed that the sole purpose of the sexual act should be procreation, and while men are allowed to express the pleasure they derive from physical contact...we women must show perfect indifference, as our enjoyment was considered immoral.' This is all wrong. This novel is set at the turn of the century...women were not seen like this at all in this period. They were seen more as ticking time bombs of lust that, once unleashed, was insatiable. It says so on Victorian Web, which I consider to be a reliable source. So there would be nothing strange about Claire's behaviour after sex. I mean, has the author not read Dracula. Bram Stoker features in this novel yet it seems as though the author hasn't actually read it or he would know that women enjoying being penetrated, whether by fangs or penises, was not a new concept at this time. In fact, it was everywhere. Women enjoyed sex TOO much which is why they needed to remain chaste. After sex, Claire cannot love any other man, ever, as her love for the trikster is so strong and feverish and she will kill herself if she doesn't get a letter from him. Yep, where is your rational female character now? Another female character, Lucy, is talked out of freaking KILLING SOMEONE because a policeman who fancies her says, 'don't stain your lovely little hands with blood' and she 'gazes up at him admiringly'. WHAT IS THIS SHIT. 7. The author is really, really inappropriately scathing about the appearance of the so-called 'Elephant Man' Joseph Merrick. The author goes on and on about what a 'hideously deformed creature' he is and how it makes one gasp and shudder and turn away to even lay eyes on him. I just found it really heartless and inconsiderate as there are a lot of people who have deformities and diseases which make them look different in some way and it seems appalling to write about disability in this way...making him seem inhuman and only worthy of pity. He was a person and should be written about as one not as some novelty in a book 8. Dialogue. Where is it? There is almost no dialogue at all in this almost 600 page novel. This means that not only is is dull and tedious, it is also rubbish at characterisation and you never feel you know any of the characters in any way. For the whole of Chapter XIII there was no dialogue whatsoever until the last line. Ridiculous. We are just TOLD that things happen but never actually see or hear them happening; there is no subtlety. We are not required to make up our own minds about characters based on evidence, but to just go along with whatever a snippet of a sentence tells us about them. One example; we are told in this chapter that Wells' wife's mother is a horrible person. We are told she reduces her daughter to 'a shivering wreck'. Do we meet this character? No. Is there any dialogue featuring her at all? No. This happens constantly throughout this novel and I HATE IT. In this chapter there is also a 2 page plot synopsis of The Time Machine by Wells. I didn't care for it. I didn't care for it at all. 9. After one of the characters believes he has time travelled, he describes that all he could smell was, 'singed butterflies'. GOOD. MAKES SENSE. WE'VE ALL SMELT THAT. 10. The time travel. Oh dear. It goes from real to false to real to false so it's hard to write about it clearly. All I do know is that it is complete bollocks that the whole of England (and the world) bought a story as flimsy as the one given in this book. So much so that they believe a tiny room is the whole of London and that there is nothing suspicious about travelling to the future in a train with blacked out windows. A good thing about this novel is that the chapter are short, so when I told myself I couldn't continue reading I set myself goals to the end of chapters which meant I could finish it. So that was good. There is a quote in this book that reads, 'his writing was infantile and verbose in equal measure, the characters were poorly drawn and the dialogue dull as dishwater.' This quote, referencing a bad novel given to Wells to review, sums up 'Map of Time' for me. Maybe I just didn't get it. Maybe this is a hilarious satire of Victorian novels and a pastiche that went so far over my head that it tricked me into thinking it was just terrible writing. Perhaps. But in my opinion that is no excuse for such a bore of a novel as this.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    The Map of Time is a wonderful novel in three parts. In the first, H.G. Wells assists in traveling to the past to prevent a murder. In the second, H.G Wells bridges the gap between the future and the present. In the third, H.G. Wells must make a decision that will chart the course of the future. The fist two stories contain romantic elements while the third is a bit of a mystery. All of the stories overlap a bit bringing different characters together at different points in time. The end result i The Map of Time is a wonderful novel in three parts. In the first, H.G. Wells assists in traveling to the past to prevent a murder. In the second, H.G Wells bridges the gap between the future and the present. In the third, H.G. Wells must make a decision that will chart the course of the future. The fist two stories contain romantic elements while the third is a bit of a mystery. All of the stories overlap a bit bringing different characters together at different points in time. The end result is a novel that explores the theme of time travel completely and questions whether one should undertake to change past events if one has the opportunity. Felix J. Palma writes beautiful prose that wanders through time. The narrator of the story occasionally addresses the reader directly to ponder events or to move the reader along to another part of the story. Although this does draw the reader out of the story a bit, I found that it gave the novel the feeling of truly listening to someone tell this story as if I were sitting right next to the narrator. The only thing that prevents me from giving The Map of Time the full five stars is the amount of repetition it contains. While some of this is completely necessary to bring characters up to speed on events as they enter the story at different points, there were times when it felt the narrator was summarizing events up to that point for the reader. These summaries felt unnecessary and added quite a bit of length to the book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    To finish this 600 page book, I had to do something unusual: take a break in the middle and read something else before going back to finish it. I’ve never done that before, but I had to get away from the all seeing, all knowing, all talking narrator who goes on like a garrulous guest at a party who traps you in the corner with an unending story. The story seems interesting, so you don’t flee outright, but you do keep an eye on potential escape routes. I grabbed this book because it was set in Vi To finish this 600 page book, I had to do something unusual: take a break in the middle and read something else before going back to finish it. I’ve never done that before, but I had to get away from the all seeing, all knowing, all talking narrator who goes on like a garrulous guest at a party who traps you in the corner with an unending story. The story seems interesting, so you don’t flee outright, but you do keep an eye on potential escape routes. I grabbed this book because it was set in Victorian London and was supposed to be about time travel. It incorporates as characters some historical figures, mainly H.G. Wells. I assumed it would be a rather steampunk-ish novel. I was wrong. The novel is divided into three sections, each dealing with a purported episode of time travel. The common thread is H.G. Wells, who keeps getting dragged into people’s time travel plots- because of his recently published novel The Time Machine – when all he really wants is to be left alone to write. Although it is not known until later, all three sections are also linked with huckster Gilliam Murray, owner of Murray’s Time Travel, his company that takes paying guests to visit the year 2000. And the underlying thread, the one of philosophy and science, constantly brings up the question of what happens when you change the past- is time immutable? Is it changeable? Is there more than one universe and more than one time? Do humans have free will? I did somewhat enjoy the book- when I went back to it, I finished it rapidly. I would have enjoyed it more if it had been shorter, not because I don’t have the attention span for long books but because there’s a good deal of extraneous matter in this novel. The entire biography of H.G. Wells up to the point of the story really isn’t germane to the tale, and there are some truly eye-glazing sections where stories are repeated in full just because they are being told to a new character, and ones where people are just moving about. Don’t read it if you’re expecting action filled steampunk; it’s more along the lines of a book that was really written in the past.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bry

    I wanted to like this book so much. It is supposed to be an international phenomenon of a book. It is all about time travel, romance, history, and features H.G. Wells as a major character. All of that leads me to think it would be incredibly intriguing and probably make for a wild ride. But this was SO NOT THE CASE. The basic story is comprised of 3 parts - the first is about a man who is mourning the loss of a woman he loved and was slaughtered by Jack the Ripper, and is convinced he can go back I wanted to like this book so much. It is supposed to be an international phenomenon of a book. It is all about time travel, romance, history, and features H.G. Wells as a major character. All of that leads me to think it would be incredibly intriguing and probably make for a wild ride. But this was SO NOT THE CASE. The basic story is comprised of 3 parts - the first is about a man who is mourning the loss of a woman he loved and was slaughtered by Jack the Ripper, and is convinced he can go back in time to save her. The second part is about a woman who tired of the Victorian era travels through time and ends up in the year 2000 and England is ruled by robots. Finally the 3rd part is about Wells trying to help Scotland Yard solve a gristly murder. Basically it is 3 different books in 1 all tied together by illusions and philosophy. Despite the disjointed plot, the biggest problem I had with the book was the author constantly addressing the reader directly. It started on page 2 and seemed as if it was happening every other page from then on. Whats worse is how pompous the author comes off - always preceeding his interjections with "You must allow me" or "Please permit me". It makes him seem as if what he has to say about the story is so much more important than the story itself. Palma himself seems to be a good writer but with so many plots happening at once he tends to jump from one idea, one situation, one plot to another without wrapping up the first or even making a decent segway. In the end I just found the book boring and the constant author interruptions seriously annoying, and just not worth devoting my life to 600 pages.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tammy Dotts

    The Map of Time presents three separate stories set in Victorian England. In the first, Andrew Harrington seeks to travel through time to save Jack the Ripper’s last victim, with whom Andrew was in love despite the differences in their social class. The second centers on Claire Haggerty’s desires to find a world where she belongs; she settles on the year 2000 when England has been overrun by robots. The final section has H.G. Wells determining which universe is real and which is merely a paralle The Map of Time presents three separate stories set in Victorian England. In the first, Andrew Harrington seeks to travel through time to save Jack the Ripper’s last victim, with whom Andrew was in love despite the differences in their social class. The second centers on Claire Haggerty’s desires to find a world where she belongs; she settles on the year 2000 when England has been overrun by robots. The final section has H.G. Wells determining which universe is real and which is merely a parallel universe destined to end abruptly. If that seems confusing, you’re not far off. The three stories are tied together loosely by the illusion and reality of time travel and by the presence of Wells. The ideas behind the novel are promising. The first two sections look at the ethics and paradoxes of time travel, while simultaneously rejecting it. Whether Wells helps Harrington really save Mary Kelly, thus creating a parallel universe in which she and Harrington can live out their lives together, isn’t as important as the effect of believing in possibility. Likewise, Haggerty’s search for somewhere her 21st-century outlook is at home and her beau’s search for meaning in life doesn’t depend on his true identity or whether Haggerty visits the future. Much like Dorothy, the answers they seek were at home all along. To explain more about the ins and outs of the Harrington and Haggerty plots leads into spoiler territory. Not that there’s much to be spoiled. The Map of Time doesn’t live up to its promise nor its book-jacket description. The characters are superficial and show no objection to being pushed into various set pieces by their overly vocal creator. Imitating the “dear reader” voice of some Victorian authors, Palma inserts himself as a commentator on action and character. At one point, he tells the reader he’s going to skip over a scene because it would be boring otherwise. Wells is an integral part of Harrington’s story and pops in and out of Haggerty’s. He receives his own focus in the final section of the book where he, Henry James and Bram Stoker are told a time traveler is about to kill them and claim some of their works as his own. Wells is perhaps the most well-developed character of the novel. Not surprising as Palma has historical details to draw on. But the section feels underdeveloped and tacked on, as if Palma wanted a better hook to draw in readers. He may not have needed one. The Victorian era is a favorite setting for authors, particularly those who dabble in time travel without jumping into steampunk. Like its cousins, The Map of Time makes sure readers revisit the high points of the time as if moving through a checklist: Jack the Ripper, Joseph Merrick, electricity, social mores. Some of these are relevant to the plot; others, mere waystations before the last page. Wells’ meeting with Merrick is the best nod to the genre tropes, with the conversation having an emotional resonance absent from the rest of the novel. The main problem with The Map of Time isn’t that it’s a bad novel. Palma’s writing can be engaging, and the pages turn quickly. Readers looking for a great time travel story or Victorian novel or simply a good read, however, will be disappointed. Too often, Palma neglects what could be a good novel in favor of moving quickly to the next section or wrapping up the novel. Glimpses of a novel that could have been devoted to Tom Blunt’s life in the lower classes or one about Wells’ personal life may cause readers to wish they could find a parallel universe to read these (possibly) more rewarding stories.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eve

    The Map of Time by Felix J. Palma succeeded for me in so many levels that it will be a challenge, albeit a pleasurable one, to adequately explain how satisfying it was. Curiously, my admiration for its execution has increased the more I reflect upon it. If you’re a science fiction fan, most especially an H.G. Wells fan; if you love time travel stories; if you love Victorian novels (the way novels were written in the Victorian era and novels set in that time) – this is the book for you. The Map o The Map of Time by Felix J. Palma succeeded for me in so many levels that it will be a challenge, albeit a pleasurable one, to adequately explain how satisfying it was. Curiously, my admiration for its execution has increased the more I reflect upon it. If you’re a science fiction fan, most especially an H.G. Wells fan; if you love time travel stories; if you love Victorian novels (the way novels were written in the Victorian era and novels set in that time) – this is the book for you. The Map of Time is a dazzling, entertaining read for the summer ... or for all time. I must caution, however, not to pay too much attention to the official synopsis. While it is not technically misleading, it only applies to a quarter of the book. If you read with the synopsis in mind, you’ll read most of the novel wondering where it’s going. The Map of Time is roughly divided into three main story arcs which at first seem very loosely interwoven. Set in 1896 London, the first part of the book is about the doomed love affair between a young society gentleman, Andrew Harrington, and the beautiful prostitute Marie Kelly. On the brink of suicide over the way the affair ended, Harrington seeks the services of Gilliam Murray’s Time Travel company, which claims the ability to transport those willing to pay a fortune to London in the year 2000, for a brief glimpse of the future. Of course, once we hear the description of what the world is like in the year 2000, we immediately know that the Time Travel company is a sham, but the novel detours from Harrington’s tragic story to Gilliam Murray’s adventurous tale in how he was able to find the hole in the fabric of time. From Murray’s Time Travel Company, the desperate Harrington then ends up at the door of H.G. Wells himself, the famous author of The Time Machine, to demand that he help him travel back in time. The second major story arc involves a surprisingly poignant romance between one of Gilliam Murray’s hired hands, handsome but poor Joe Blunt, and a young society lady who falls too successfully for the Time Travel Company’s sham, Claire Haggerty. If you’re a fan of the movie, Somewhere in Time, like I am, you will love this part. In addition to H.G. Wells, other figures of that era enliven the narrative, Jack the Ripper, John Merrick the Elephant Man, Bram Stoker, and Henry James. For about two-thirds of The Map of Time, the author plays around with the idea of time travel, setting up extraordinary scenarios before drawing the curtain aside to reveal wizardry at work different from magic or science. The final, and most breathtaking, part of the novel is where all the themes of the tangential storylines merge and the uniting figure of H.G. Wells, the father of time travel fiction, takes full, center stage. And just to encourage all of you hard core science fiction fans to persevere through the seemingly picaresque parts that come before – this is where all the playing around comes to an end and we get the full time travel treatment in concentrated form – parallel universes, loopholes in the time continuum, alternative histories, as well as the truth of the titular, elusive Map of Time. "'What would the world really look like in a hundred years' time?' he wondered...It was a pipe dream of course, but there was nothing to stop him from pretending he could do it, he told himself, settling back in his seat and ceremoniously pulling the lever down, experiencing the inevitable frisson of excitement he felt whenever he performed the gesture. "However, to his astonishment, this time when the lever had come to halt, a sudden darkness fell on the attic. The flecks of moonlight shining through the window seemed to withdraw, leaving him in total dark. Before he was able to understand what was going on, he was overcome by a dreadful feeling of vertigo and sudden giddiness. He felt himself floating, drifting through a mysterious void that could have been the cosmos itself. And as he began to lose consciousness, all he managed to think was either he was having a heart attack or he really was traveling to the year 2000 after all." I got my science fiction fix by the end, but The Map of Time also offered some fascinating thoughts: that love, in a sense, is an equal or greater force than the mythical ability to cross time. Love can bridge distances and transcend obstacles time travel cannot; it can change a predestined future as powerfully as going back in the past to render a different outcome in the present. And, as The Map of Time involves several characters as writers, would be ones and real-life ones, even the power of one’s imagination, its "infinite capacity," is comparable to time travel. The novel ends aptly, with H.G. Wells pondering on the miraculous experience of reading – that we, as readers are not merely spectators, but in having reading a book set in 1896, have also, in a way, journeyed through time and space ourselves.

  14. 4 out of 5

    William Thomas

    Felix Palma is a fairly talented writer of prose, but not a talented storyteller. Not in the least. Although the writing is smooth and velvety, the book is actually a jumble of confused plot lines mixed up in a hundred different stories that do nothing to capture the imagination or tie up the frayed ends. I'm not a fan of time-travel stories. I think they're terrifically lazy. They seem to me to be so popular because everyone fantasizes about traveling through time- mostly in some selfish way th Felix Palma is a fairly talented writer of prose, but not a talented storyteller. Not in the least. Although the writing is smooth and velvety, the book is actually a jumble of confused plot lines mixed up in a hundred different stories that do nothing to capture the imagination or tie up the frayed ends. I'm not a fan of time-travel stories. I think they're terrifically lazy. They seem to me to be so popular because everyone fantasizes about traveling through time- mostly in some selfish way that has only to do with their own lifetime and their own terrible choices. And Palma actually does a good job of admitting this same sentiment in The Map of Time, stating that everyone has that yearning. My problem with it is that unless you're Kurt Vonnegut, there is never any weight to a time-travel story. Palma gives us a sense of gravity here with the setting and the use of historical figures, but when we strip that away, it's really nothing at the center. And can we seriously just stop using Jack the fu$&ing Ripper already? It makes me want to skip over every single page that mentions the crimes or the murderer. It's just silly anymore. Grade: C-

  15. 4 out of 5

    Liv

    After reading two chapters, 28 pages into the book, I decided to give up. There was no way that I would be able to suffer through the torture for 600+ pages. The novel was set in a Victoria era. It read like a historical fiction, and the language used was very much “proper old-style English”. First off, I really did not like the way the author wrote these long-winded sentences, describing anything and everything in a flowery descriptive manner that drove me nuts. It took forever for the author to After reading two chapters, 28 pages into the book, I decided to give up. There was no way that I would be able to suffer through the torture for 600+ pages. The novel was set in a Victoria era. It read like a historical fiction, and the language used was very much “proper old-style English”. First off, I really did not like the way the author wrote these long-winded sentences, describing anything and everything in a flowery descriptive manner that drove me nuts. It took forever for the author to get to the point and I lost my patience rather quickly after the first chapter. And quite frankly, I didn’t really see any relevance to the story (yet) and I didn’t care for it, even though it was only beginning. Also, the story began with this character, Andrew, and it was told in a third-person view since the start. Then the author suddenly switched and started writing as though he was a narrator, commenting on the character’s actions and surroundings while the story unfolded. It was maddening!! I couldn’t stand it. This just didn’t work for me whatsoever. This could have been a wonderful book with amazing characters, plot etc. I could also see how this would appeal to many other readers who may love historical fiction. I was turned off mainly because of the style of writing, not because of the plot itself, although I must say it was hard for me to comment on that since I only read two chapters. I decidedly stopped at that point, because this was a really long novel (600+ pages) and I simply couldn’t see myself enjoying it much. So, what more to say other than that it was too painful for me to continue?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ranting Dragon

    http://www.rantingdragon.com/the-map-... The Map of Time by esteemed Spanish author Felix J. Palma is a mesmerising work of literary fiction with speculative aspects and pays unabashed homage to H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine. Expertly translated from Palma’s native Spanish by Nick Caistor, The Map of Time is finally ready to enthrall English speaking readers with its lyrical prose and unique narrative voice. Our story begins in 1896 London where H. G. Well’s latest ‘Scientific Romance’, The Time M http://www.rantingdragon.com/the-map-... The Map of Time by esteemed Spanish author Felix J. Palma is a mesmerising work of literary fiction with speculative aspects and pays unabashed homage to H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine. Expertly translated from Palma’s native Spanish by Nick Caistor, The Map of Time is finally ready to enthrall English speaking readers with its lyrical prose and unique narrative voice. Our story begins in 1896 London where H. G. Well’s latest ‘Scientific Romance’, The Time Machine, is the talk of fashionable and unfashionable society alike, resulting in a craze for anything and everything to do with time travel. To some, it offers a chance to see the future; to others, a chance to change the past… and for some, it offers a last hope to cling to. Two such individuals are Andrew Harrington and Claire Haggerty. Andrew counts down to suicide as he is overwhelmed by guilt surrounding the death of his beloved at the hands of Jack the Ripper eight years previously. Claire, on the other hand, believes she was born far too early and feels smothered by the constraints of Victorian society. Certain she cannot be satisfied in the current era, Claire longs for a far off future where she may truly belong. Thus, when a new time travel company appears to offer each the opportunity to fulfil their greatest wish, both Andrew and Claire embrace the notion with open arms. However, nothing is as it seems, and it falls to the author whose work inspired their dreams to deal with the inevitable consequences. Just who is the narrator anyway? The novel is divided into 3 distinct parts, each of which stands superficially as its own separate story. However, the plots of these tales become firmly entwined as the tale progresses, just as the lives of the characters become entangled with that of H. G. Wells. By the end of the third act, all the separate storylines have come together and events which went unexplained in one part are accounted for in the context of another. One of the most distinctive aspects of this novel is the unique narrative style. The omnipresent narrator that guides the reader throughout the tale is a character in their own right. They are shameless in dropping hints regarding their identity and powers, sharing their opinion on matters afoot, and digressing from the main plot to pass over ‘the dull parts’ (for instance, a carriage ride between locations). Although I’ve heard quite a few readers decry this as unnecessarily tangental and distracting from the story, I believe first and foremost that it is this narration which makes the novel stand out from others. I found the narrator quite fascinating and thoroughly enjoyed their witty commentary regarding society and mankind. Beautiful prose and believable characters The prose throughout A Map of Time is lyrical and flowing, a credit to both the author and the translator. I found it extremely difficult to tell that the novel was not originally written in English. In addition, Palma’s characters are three dimensional, believable and relateable. At times, their decisions are foolish or downright reprehensible, and not a single character is without their flaws. Nevertheless, I found it difficult not to like and sympathize with these imperfect individuals as they seek to find purpose, achieve a goal, or right the wrongs of the past. Wells himself is an interesting character, embodying a mixture of noble and ignoble traits, who finds himself embroiled in the lives of the true protagonists through duty and the entreaties of his wife, Jane. Is this really ‘speculative fiction?’ Throughout the novel, the plot takes a number of unexpected twists and turns that may have readers feeling cheated, scratching their heads, and wondering what it is exactly that they are reading. The unexplained and the mundane become almost indistinguishable to the point where the reader mistrusts their own ability to tell between truth and lies, the real and the imagined. Nevertheless, all becomes clear by the end of the novel and I, for one, was not disappointed. Any more than that, I will not say for fear of spoiling it, so you’ll have to find out the answers yourself! True to its literary roots, The Map of Time explores some thought provoking philosophical and metaphysical questions. For instance, what happens if we alter history? Do we really have a right to the future? Perhaps even more essential to the plot are the questions involving truth, lies, and the human experience. What matters most, truth or happiness? Is a cruel truth truly better than a beautiful lie? And when it comes down to it, is there really that much of a difference between the two? Why should you read this book? The Map of Time is a truly unique reading experience that should appeal to fans of literary and speculative fiction alike. Although it won’t suit the tastes of every reader, I would recommend it to almost anyone as something that simply must be tried—if only for its sheer distinctiveness compared to most other contemporary works . You’ll either love or hate it, but either way you’ll have read something truly unlike anything that’s come before, the echoes of which will remain with you long after you turn the final page.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Abish

    I decided to read this book because I heard it was a hit in the UK and the cover looked cool. I thought it would be a change from what I normally read (women's fiction). I ended up being disappointed. The book had some promise when it talked about time travel and Jack the Ripper but most of the book was slow and somewhat boring. I found myself skimming a lot to get through the 600 pages without wasting too much of my time. The book starts out telling the tale of a miserable young man, Andrew, who I decided to read this book because I heard it was a hit in the UK and the cover looked cool. I thought it would be a change from what I normally read (women's fiction). I ended up being disappointed. The book had some promise when it talked about time travel and Jack the Ripper but most of the book was slow and somewhat boring. I found myself skimming a lot to get through the 600 pages without wasting too much of my time. The book starts out telling the tale of a miserable young man, Andrew, who wants to kill himself on the anniversary of his beloved's death. Eight years ago, he fell in love with a whore that was killed by Jack the Ripper. Before Andrew can kill himself, his cousin convinces him that he can go back in time to save her. They go to H.G. Wells, the author of The Time Machine, for help. Turns out, Wells is in possession of a working time machine and Andrew goes back in time to kill Jack the Ripper. This is where the book had some promise and then went south. Spoiler alert: After Andrew kills Jack the Ripper, he travels back to his own time. He realizes that even though he saved Marie, he can't be with her because she now lives in a parallel universe. Satisfied, Andrew moves on with his life instead of continuing his wretched existence. After all this happens, you find out that Andrew has been tricked into thinking he went back in time. The whole thing was a hoax by his cousin employing actors and the help of H.G. Wells. The book also has two other spin off stories, all linked by Wells. Neither one is interesting.

  18. 5 out of 5

    J.K. Grice

    This premise had incredible potential, and the story starts out great. However, it becomes a rather jumbled mess, being too chaotic and fragmented for my tastes. THE MAP OF TIME was a book where I just stopped caring about the characters and where they were headed.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Lewis

    Tim: I just finished this book and I have to say it has one of the biggest jaw dropping reveals that I've seen or read. This is what M. Night Shyamalan could only wish he could do with every story he tells. Map of Time by Felix J. Palma has me wanting to read it all over again, just so I can find the clues that were there for the taking. There are three stories, told by a third party narrator, that interweave in and out of each other like a well choreographed tango. Each player knows the part th Tim: I just finished this book and I have to say it has one of the biggest jaw dropping reveals that I've seen or read. This is what M. Night Shyamalan could only wish he could do with every story he tells. Map of Time by Felix J. Palma has me wanting to read it all over again, just so I can find the clues that were there for the taking. There are three stories, told by a third party narrator, that interweave in and out of each other like a well choreographed tango. Each player knows the part they are to play and each one realizes that they can change fate because they read about it. H.G Wells has written a book about the possibility of time travel and Gilliam Murray has set up shop in London claiming he can do it. H.G. Wells is pressed into becoming a reluctant hero in all three stories as he meets fictional (Gilliam Murray, Tom Blunt, and Andrew Harrington) and real-life people (The Elephant Man, Bram Stoker, Henry James), to find out if we really can change our fate. The author drops many details from the era that history buffs and Easter-egg hunters will love. Definitely pay attention to details that are given to us by the author, because it will pay off in the end. He doesn't just describe it for no reason. There is a reason why he is going into great detail about a person and their surroundings. I really wish I could read this book again right this minute, but I have many others to read. Stop by the store and ask me about it or pick the book up, so I can start sharing spoilers with you. I can't wait!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wart Hill

    Very interesting. A little too much exposition in places, but overall I enjoyed it (despite taking insanely long to finish it...)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paul Pessolano

    The Map of Time” by Felix J. Palma, published by Atria Books. Category – Sci/Fi/Fantasy In Victorian England one could go to Murray’s Time Travel and be transported to the year 2000. They could witness the climatic conclusion of a fight for world domination between Solomon, the King of the Automatons, and Captain Derek Shackleton, the last hope for the human race. The story begins with Andrew Harrington, from a well to do family, contemplating taking his life because his new found love, a prostitut The Map of Time” by Felix J. Palma, published by Atria Books. Category – Sci/Fi/Fantasy In Victorian England one could go to Murray’s Time Travel and be transported to the year 2000. They could witness the climatic conclusion of a fight for world domination between Solomon, the King of the Automatons, and Captain Derek Shackleton, the last hope for the human race. The story begins with Andrew Harrington, from a well to do family, contemplating taking his life because his new found love, a prostitute, has been murdered by none other than Jack the Ripper. Andrew’s friend Charles tries to avert the suicide by taking Andrew to Murray and have him travel back in time to save his love. Murray can only go forward in time and has him contact H.G. Wells who he believes has a time machine that will go back in time. An elaborate scheme is made up to get Andrew back in time to kill Jack the Ripper before he murders his love. A nice side this story is a visit by Wells to see John Merrick, the Elephant Man, in which the reader will be told of his gross deformity and how he was able to get through life under very difficult circumstances. Claire Haggerty finds the world she is living in quite mundane and devoid of any true suitor for her hand. She finds herself at Murray’s Time Travel and witnesses the victory of Shackleton and falls in love with him. Unfortunately, he lives in another time period and although she tries she is unable to remain in the year 2000. Shackleton, also smitten, travels back in time to meet Claire. I read very little Science Fiction/Fantasy but I found this a very well done story that brings to life the Victorian age and the people of that period. It is fascinating to see how the author brings into the story the likes of H.G. Wells, Henry James, Bram Stoker, and Jack the Ripper. Although there are some parts that are a little prolonged the overall book moves along at a brisk pace and provides a different and very satisfying read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    I was expecting this to be a time-consuming read, but it was actually written in a rather breezy style and I had a lot of fun with it. It was far more a time travel fantasy than it was science fiction-y. It actually reminded me of The Anubis Gates in quite a few ways. The book is comprised of three separate stories, but they all feature H. G. Wells and contain clever links to each other. I was expecting this to be a time-consuming read, but it was actually written in a rather breezy style and I had a lot of fun with it. It was far more a time travel fantasy than it was science fiction-y. It actually reminded me of The Anubis Gates in quite a few ways. The book is comprised of three separate stories, but they all feature H. G. Wells and contain clever links to each other.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is going to be a tough review to write. I can tell you how The Map of Time by Felix J. Palma begins. I could possibly even tell you what the Map of Time is. But most everything else I would want to tell you, I can’t tell you. It would spoil something. And this is the sort of book where you really don’t want the plot twists spoiled. First thing I loved about this novel: the Narrator. This is not just any omniscient narrator — this one has a charming voice and a lovely way to tell a story. “Assu This is going to be a tough review to write. I can tell you how The Map of Time by Felix J. Palma begins. I could possibly even tell you what the Map of Time is. But most everything else I would want to tell you, I can’t tell you. It would spoil something. And this is the sort of book where you really don’t want the plot twists spoiled. First thing I loved about this novel: the Narrator. This is not just any omniscient narrator — this one has a charming voice and a lovely way to tell a story. “Assuming you stay until the end of this tale, some of you will no doubt think that I chose the wrong thread with which to begin spinning my yarn, and that for accuracy’s sake I should have respected chronological order and begun with Miss Haggerty’s story. It is possible, but there are stories that cannot begin at their beginning, and perhaps this is one of them.” Andrew Harrington is a troubled young man and he is about to do something profoundly stupid. Fate is going to intervene and push him in an entirely different direction and it is an amazing, complicated and surprising journey. Set in Victorian England, H.G. Wells has just published The Time Machine and a little store-front business called Murray’s Time Travel has opened in London. Andrew and his cousin, Charles, hope to use their services to avert a tragedy. The story spirals and explodes from there. We go forward in time, back in time, and sometimes we move in a relatively straight line. We’ve got The Time Machine and Dracula. We’ve automatons, amateur assassins, star-crossed lovers, greed and betrayal. There is violence and mayhem and true love — even a little sex. It is full of famous characters — H.G. Wells, Joseph Merrick, Jack the Ripper and Bram Stoker — and they all play a part. “Yes, I know that when I began this tale I promised there would be a fabulous time machine, and there will be, there will even be intrepid explorers and fierce native tribes — a must in any adventure story.” I wish I could tell you more about it! Unfortunately, anything I might tell you is bound to spoil some surprise that’s waiting for you in the winding paths of these pages. It’s a story that held my attention for 600+ pages and that is no small feat. I loved the way the story unfolded and I found myself wondering as we meandered along just how Palma would bring the tendrils of this story all together in the end, and I was not disappointed. It’s a terrific read and one I highly recommend.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lyndsay

    My husband bought this book but gave up on it pretty quickly. He told me it got too "sci fi". Which is funny because it is very, very obvious that the subject of time travel will come up at some point. But after reading it I could pinpoint exactly where the book lost him (even before I stumbled upon the bookmark he had left in it). In my opinion, the jacket summary is a bit misleading as it doesn't get to the real meat of the book until the last third. This last part is the best part, yet you ne My husband bought this book but gave up on it pretty quickly. He told me it got too "sci fi". Which is funny because it is very, very obvious that the subject of time travel will come up at some point. But after reading it I could pinpoint exactly where the book lost him (even before I stumbled upon the bookmark he had left in it). In my opinion, the jacket summary is a bit misleading as it doesn't get to the real meat of the book until the last third. This last part is the best part, yet you need the first two for it to work correctly. This isn't to say the first parts aren't interesting but again...not the reason you bought the book in the first place. Saving literary classics? Bring it on! No. Really. Please bring that part on. Looking over the entire vista of the novel it is successful, interesting and well thought out. But when down in the trenches actually READING the novel....that's a different story. The tone of the narrator irritated me to no end. The writing style alienated me. It's as if commas were breeding and multiplying and trying to populate the book entirely. Some parts were ridiculously extemporaneous, and the nature of the subject matter required way more exposition than I prefer. Also, the metaphors were really awkward ("it was like glittering insects....but you know what....maybe it was more like pollen...don't you think?" You're the writer- you tell me) (that wasn't a direct quote) (I probably shouldn't write a book because I use parentheses all wrong and I'm aware that I would be a hypocrite because I judge people on this sort of thing). I am sure a few of the problems I have with the actual writing are owing to the fact that it is a translation. But they are still problems. I just never had such a difficult time reading a good book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    colleen the convivial curmudgeon

    3.5 This book isn't what I expected. Based on the cover and the blurb I was expecting some sort of mad-cap mystery adventure dealing with time travel - but it's much more subtle than that. What it is is three stories, loosely interwoven, about this group of people and moments - coincidences and accidents - which change the courses of their lives. It's about the way that time and lives and interconnected in ways we barely imagine and almost are never entirely aware of. And, at its heart, it's also 3.5 This book isn't what I expected. Based on the cover and the blurb I was expecting some sort of mad-cap mystery adventure dealing with time travel - but it's much more subtle than that. What it is is three stories, loosely interwoven, about this group of people and moments - coincidences and accidents - which change the courses of their lives. It's about the way that time and lives and interconnected in ways we barely imagine and almost are never entirely aware of. And, at its heart, it's also a sort of love story. It is a bit wordy, but once I got used to the style I hardly even noticed anymore, to be honest. I think part of the reason it bothered me in the beginning is because I was waiting for things to happen - for that madcap adventure to begin - but once I realized that the seeming tangents and divergences were the story, or parts of the story, then I started enjoying it much better. Which isn't to say it wasn't without fault. The biggest issue was that there are times when information is given in large expositionary info-dumps - monologuing, even - and these slowed things down and were kind of annoying. The greatest culprit for these was Gilliam Murray, and I generally liked the parts with him the least. (Though H.G. Wells is guilty of it, too, in the third part.) And the author had a self-aware way of breaking the fourth wall and talking to the audience which sort of annoyed me. I got used to it, by the end, but I could've lived without it all the same. Anyway - I liked parts one and two better than part three, which is a bit disappointing since it's never good to go out on a meh ending. That said, I did like the sort of epilogue bits reflecting and the aforementioned connections which were forged throughout the book. In the end I liked it, but I'm not sure I would recommend it without reservation. It's not for everyone. People who are more plot and/or action focused, who have no taste or patience for lush, sometimes wandering prose, will certainly have a problem with it. I will look into the next in the series. I don't have an "I must read it now!" sort of reaction, but I'm certainly not opposed to it, either. I suppose we'll see what happens in the course of time...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alesha Hubbell

    I won this book as a Goodreads First Read. And I really enjoyed it. It was not what I expected, but I can't tell too much in what ways because it'll give too much away. The three parts are very different and mostly very seperate stories, yet they go together in a perfect way. One of the characters who ties the stories together is the author H. G. Wells. This inclusion seemed an odd choice to me until the character appeared in the novel and then it seemed perfect. He easily was my favorite charct I won this book as a Goodreads First Read. And I really enjoyed it. It was not what I expected, but I can't tell too much in what ways because it'll give too much away. The three parts are very different and mostly very seperate stories, yet they go together in a perfect way. One of the characters who ties the stories together is the author H. G. Wells. This inclusion seemed an odd choice to me until the character appeared in the novel and then it seemed perfect. He easily was my favorite charcter. The novel also took an interesting look at science fiction, and it's beginnings. As well as it's relationship to it's author and it's reader. As a reader of very little escience fiction this gave me an interesting perspective and new apprication for early science fiction especially. To aid in this widening of scope a copy of The Time Machine was included with the copy I won of The Map of Time. It is not necessary to read one before the other, but the two together added more depth to the backstory of the publication of The Time Machine and it's effect on the populaiotn and Wells himself. The only slight complaint I had of The Map of Time was the first person perspective the author took, addressing the audience directly. Sometime this worked well and sometime it distracted a little from the story. But, these interludes were generally brief and sometimes with large gaps between them.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    DNF for only one reason: I couldn't keep dealing with the meandering plot. Everything else was fantastic. The writing was great, a beautiful translation (I've read some limp translations in my time). The voice sucked me right in as engaging and I couldn't wait to keep reading. The premise itself had me hooked and I wanted to know where it all went and ultimately ended up. But damn it all if I had to deal with another multi-chapter aside that served as filler while the characters traveled or thoug DNF for only one reason: I couldn't keep dealing with the meandering plot. Everything else was fantastic. The writing was great, a beautiful translation (I've read some limp translations in my time). The voice sucked me right in as engaging and I couldn't wait to keep reading. The premise itself had me hooked and I wanted to know where it all went and ultimately ended up. But damn it all if I had to deal with another multi-chapter aside that served as filler while the characters traveled or thought or did whatever else it was they did. It was like someone constantly using filler words instead of employing the age-old failsafe, silence. I felt jerked around by the plot. Just as I was settling into the story, I was bucked right out of it and into someone else's but it wouldn't last long enough for me to acclimate; just long enough for me to lose my footing and have to get hold of it all over again. I'm hoping, in the future, when my TBR pile isn't capable of growing teeth and eating me alive, that I'll be able to come back to this one, settle in and really finish it. It's a long one: coming in at over 600 pages so it will take some time. Unfortunately I don't have the patience to wade through it right now and deal with all of those lurches in the plot. I loved everything about it. From what I read, the story was fantastic and compelling and the voice induced some writer envy in me. But the timing just wasn't right. Hopefully soon it will be.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gena

    I kept wondering what the author was thinking, doing and smoking when he wrote this. It is the most bizarre book I've read in a while. I think I kept reading because I couldn't believe it was so - so - odd. It's like 3 books put together, none of which make much sense. In the first part a guy wants to go back in time and stop Jack the Ripper from killing the woman he loves. The middle of the book deals with a guy who works for the company that provides Victorians with the touristy opportunity to I kept wondering what the author was thinking, doing and smoking when he wrote this. It is the most bizarre book I've read in a while. I think I kept reading because I couldn't believe it was so - so - odd. It's like 3 books put together, none of which make much sense. In the first part a guy wants to go back in time and stop Jack the Ripper from killing the woman he loves. The middle of the book deals with a guy who works for the company that provides Victorians with the touristy opportunity to go back in time to the day humans lost the war and machines too over. The last third deals with H.G. Wells writing The Time Machine from personal experience because he has a time machine in his attic and goes back in time. Oh, and someone is going to kill him and other famous writers and claim their work for his own in the future. Okay. It's all very weird and strange but I kept reading and reading because I wanted to find out if it made any sense at all. Don't get me wrong, I love Steampunk. I love Victorian writers as well as the setting (Those Mark Hodder books about Sir Richard Burton are great) but I did not love this book. Don't be seduced by the cover, which is awesome, because this is one strange book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    Three stars is me being generous. It was so promising, the cover was attractive, the symmary looked equally (if not more so) promising, but when I started reading I was just so confused. I remember constantly thinks where, what, how, ... it soon stopped being fun. I might like it better if I reread it, but for some reason I doubt it. I am still wondering if it is the writing or me just not being smart enough.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kaila

    So much exposition. 700 pages of telling me what's going on. A couple of the ideas did interest me, but they were couched is so much prose and bad writing, they lost any power they might have had. And to top it off, REALLY bad views towards women. So much exposition. 700 pages of telling me what's going on. A couple of the ideas did interest me, but they were couched is so much prose and bad writing, they lost any power they might have had. And to top it off, REALLY bad views towards women.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.