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Mind Storm

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The first in an exciting new sci-fi series that’s being described as Blade Runner meets X-Men Two hundred and fifty years after the world was nearly wiped out by nuclear war, what’s left of society fights over the scraps of the Earth as the rich and powerful plan to ascend in secret to another planet. But the deadly new breed of humanity that the rulers have enslaved to pr The first in an exciting new sci-fi series that’s being described as Blade Runner meets X-Men Two hundred and fifty years after the world was nearly wiped out by nuclear war, what’s left of society fights over the scraps of the Earth as the rich and powerful plan to ascend in secret to another planet. But the deadly new breed of humanity that the rulers have enslaved to protect their interests are about to change everything. K.M. Ruiz’s Mind Storm is the rip-roaring tale of Threnody Corwin, a “psion” with the ability to channel electricity like lightning through anything she touches. As a solider-slave for the human government, Threnody is recruited by an unknown enemy: the scion of Earth’s most powerful (and supposedly human) family, the Serca Syndicate. But Lucas Serca is far from human and he intends to make Threnody and her fellow psions meet their destiny, no matter how many people he has to kill to do it. Mind Storm is the first of two books chronicling the fight for survival by the psions and other “gene-trash” humans, before they’re killed by the racist world government, or left to die on a crumbling Earth.


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The first in an exciting new sci-fi series that’s being described as Blade Runner meets X-Men Two hundred and fifty years after the world was nearly wiped out by nuclear war, what’s left of society fights over the scraps of the Earth as the rich and powerful plan to ascend in secret to another planet. But the deadly new breed of humanity that the rulers have enslaved to pr The first in an exciting new sci-fi series that’s being described as Blade Runner meets X-Men Two hundred and fifty years after the world was nearly wiped out by nuclear war, what’s left of society fights over the scraps of the Earth as the rich and powerful plan to ascend in secret to another planet. But the deadly new breed of humanity that the rulers have enslaved to protect their interests are about to change everything. K.M. Ruiz’s Mind Storm is the rip-roaring tale of Threnody Corwin, a “psion” with the ability to channel electricity like lightning through anything she touches. As a solider-slave for the human government, Threnody is recruited by an unknown enemy: the scion of Earth’s most powerful (and supposedly human) family, the Serca Syndicate. But Lucas Serca is far from human and he intends to make Threnody and her fellow psions meet their destiny, no matter how many people he has to kill to do it. Mind Storm is the first of two books chronicling the fight for survival by the psions and other “gene-trash” humans, before they’re killed by the racist world government, or left to die on a crumbling Earth.

30 review for Mind Storm

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    I would have liked this book better if there was one likeable character in it. Instead practically every character is a ruthless evil monster who kills indiscriminately, graphically and bloodily. In Mind Storm, after a nuclear war, the world is limited to a few enclaves of prosperity controlled by the World Court. Psions, specially talented mutants who came into being as a result of the war, are untrusted by humanity, so are rigidly controlled by the World Court. The Psions are charged with prote I would have liked this book better if there was one likeable character in it. Instead practically every character is a ruthless evil monster who kills indiscriminately, graphically and bloodily. In Mind Storm, after a nuclear war, the world is limited to a few enclaves of prosperity controlled by the World Court. Psions, specially talented mutants who came into being as a result of the war, are untrusted by humanity, so are rigidly controlled by the World Court. The Psions are charged with protecting humanity, and dare not rebel because each has a neuro bomb implanted in their skulls. One bad move, and they are dead. The Psions, telepaths, who read minds, empaths, who can disable minds, telekinetics, who move objects and pyros, who start fires are all graded on a sliding scale. The lower your Class talent, the higher your power. Multiple talents are extremely rare. Almost all Psions are in the Stryker Syndicate, which is controlled by the World Court, but some renegade Psions undermine the World Court’s power. Unbeknownst to the The World Court, Nathan Serca, a powerful businessman in the elite of the world, is also a Psion. His family developed the special bioware, that most of the World Court members wear to protect themselves from the Psions, but Nathan's family have secret ways to bypass the bioware. Plus he has masterfully maneuvered the World Court for decades. Uncontrolled by the neurotransmitters, free to wreck havoc on the hapless humans, and powerful enough to manipulate the minds of the World Court members, the Serca’s ruthlessly use their Psion soldiers and family to control the world. The World Court has a plan to escape the dying Earth and go to Mars, which was being terraformed at the time of the war, with so-called clean humans, those with DNA unsullied by any traces of Psion power. Nathan, however, has a plan as well, destroy the other Psions and go to Mars where he can rule. Nathan has genetically altered his children to be warriors in his control. His daughter Samantha, a powerful telepath and her twin Gideon, an equally powerful telekinetic. His son Lukas, who is a Class One Talent, and his youngest daughter, an insane empath, who has to feed on human and Psion minds to live. Nathan ruthlessly controls his children by forcibly mindwiping them. Two years ago, however, Lukas rebelled against his father and left. It seems that Lukas was contacted by Aisling, a young Precog, who lived hundreds of years prior to this book. Lukas, who has a plan as well. He recruits 4 Stryker Synidcate Psions, Threnody, an electrokinetic, her partner, Quinton, a pyro, Jason, a telekininetic and his partner, a powerful damaged telepath, in his plot to save the people of Earth from being left to die when the World Court takes only the “clean” humans to Mars. The buildup is impressive, and there is plenty of action to go around as Lukas battles his siblings Samantha, Gideon and his father’s soldiers. Meanwhile there is continuous political maneuvering. Sounds cool. Granted that Nathan is a monster, who mindwipes humans into controlled slaves, but Lukas also kills ruthlessly and the body count rises to epic proportions. Other Sercas eat minds and destroy other Psions in particularly grotesque ways. Plus the novel ends on a cliff hanger. So all in all, I can only give the author kudos for a good first novel, in what seems to be a coming trilogy, but we need a little more humanity and a little less morbid bloodshed.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    The beginning of the book seemed to be a little disconnected; jumped right in to the story and had me looking back and rereading to make sure of what was going on and understanding the main characters. But the book picked right up and was a very interesting story which I enjoyed, and it kept me in it right to the end. The book is the first of two, which left me hanging on and definitely has me looking out for the second book and forward to the conclusion of the story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bauer

    In my opinion this book by novelist KM Ruiz is an excellent example of what happens when an author creates a compelling and vivid background, comprehensive and interesting world building, and plenty of action scenes but fails to execute on other fundamentals such as character, drama and the narrative itself. In "Mind Storm" Ruiz crafts a frightening future vision of global dystopia, enigmatic psion powers and shadowy conspiracies. I was immediately drawn to the painstaking details of the alt-futu In my opinion this book by novelist KM Ruiz is an excellent example of what happens when an author creates a compelling and vivid background, comprehensive and interesting world building, and plenty of action scenes but fails to execute on other fundamentals such as character, drama and the narrative itself. In "Mind Storm" Ruiz crafts a frightening future vision of global dystopia, enigmatic psion powers and shadowy conspiracies. I was immediately drawn to the painstaking details of the alt-future rendered in the work. The details and raw creativity of psion-oriented combat was also very novel and fun to read; telepathic haymakers and pyrokinetic jabs splashing over weakening telekinetic shields was excellent imagery. But... Most of the time I felt as if I were watching my son play a videogame on his XBOX. The narrative was mediocre in terms of pure storytelling. In video games there is term for a certain class of first person shooter called a "rail shooter" wherein the player is forced to follow a pre-determined path and takes actions in a purely reactive fashion. There is no option to leave the rail. I felt this book was a similar experience. Got a little boring early on. The protagonist of the story was actually nothing of the sort. The protag is swept up in events, making no decisions, taking no actions unless bid by a pseudo-deus ex machina character who is all powerful and all-knowing. At no point in the book was there any actual tension in part because the primary characters were simply 2D cutouts. No individual motives, no sense of individuality aside from their "labels" granted by their particular psi-powers. Could not have cared less what happened to them. The most interesting characters in the entire book are the antagonists which is fine, but there is a likely a problem when a reader starts to root for the bad guy simply because they are DOING something. I understand there is a sequel to the book and I'm going to read it just to see some of the impressive world-building and backstory created in the series. I just hope the author chooses to breathe a little more life into the main characters this time around.

  4. 4 out of 5

    izawoodsman

    While the surrounding plot was interesting, some of the writing could have been better. More time could have been spent on character development initially as it was a tad confusing later to try to remember who was paired with another, which was a little annoying since it mattered in the last quarter of the book. I could have used a cheat sheet, I feel if the plot depends on the relationship, it should be developed more as the story flows. I am NOT asking for a 30 page info dump, just have the in While the surrounding plot was interesting, some of the writing could have been better. More time could have been spent on character development initially as it was a tad confusing later to try to remember who was paired with another, which was a little annoying since it mattered in the last quarter of the book. I could have used a cheat sheet, I feel if the plot depends on the relationship, it should be developed more as the story flows. I am NOT asking for a 30 page info dump, just have the interaction support the relationships so they stick with the reader. Another peeve of mine is information not given to characters simply because. There was no reason for that other than to keep everyone but the author in the dark. The story would not have been less if the information had been revealed earlier, and probably would have allowed for those interactions that were missing for character development. Lazy writing or inexperience? I am not sure as this is the first I have read this author. I will need to check, but this seemed to be written as part of a series. Too much hinted at, but not resolved or taken up later. I could list quite a few without looking back at the book. Not worth the effort for a three star book and probably too many spoilers anyway. If part of a series, it would be pointless anyway. The problem with that is, if this is the first in a series, then it needed to grab me enough to want to read more. I am not sure it has done that. Plot was ok, but who do I care about? I think it's supposed to two maybe three of the central characters, but I don't know enough about them to want to read through another possible info dump placed right in the middle of the climactic fight scene. (Yes that was done, and just how many of us need to know an electrical system is three phase anyway?(I know what that means and didn't need to know!)) A different enough view of post-apocalyptic nuclear war, with touches of an idea from Richard Cowper. If, like me, you can't seem to find anything good to read, it's good enough for Shelter in Place reading. (2020s version of a vacation beach read I guess.)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Strider

    Pros: lots of psionic action, complex post-apocalyptic world, political intrigue Cons: little character development, repetition Roughly 250 years after the nuclear war that destroyed the world, humanity is still picking up the pieces. DNA clean humans run the World Court, governments and businesses, while unregistered humans struggle to survive. Out of the radiation fallout rose a new race, those with psionic abilities. Those the government controls with an implanted kill switch are called the St Pros: lots of psionic action, complex post-apocalyptic world, political intrigue Cons: little character development, repetition Roughly 250 years after the nuclear war that destroyed the world, humanity is still picking up the pieces. DNA clean humans run the World Court, governments and businesses, while unregistered humans struggle to survive. Out of the radiation fallout rose a new race, those with psionic abilities. Those the government controls with an implanted kill switch are called the Strykers Syndicate. They fight against unregistered psions and a well organized group called the Warhounds. Nathan Serca is head of the Serca Syndicate and unknown to the World Court only one of two triad psions. The other triad is his eldest, now renegade, son, Lucas. For two years his other children have been unsuccessful in tracking and killing Lucas. Nathan's patience is running out as important plans come to fruition. Meanwhile Lucas is amassing a team of psions to help him with his own plans. The action is plentiful and varied, showing the various powers off. While relegated to a handful of powers (telepaths, telekinetics, teleporters, empaths, pyrokinetics, psychometrists, precognitives and elctrokinetics), the characters use their powers in creative ways. The limit on their powers (the more they use them, the sooner they die) was a nice touch. Action scenes are offset by political intrigue between several groups of players, all of whom think they know everything that's going on, none of whom actually do. The world is realistically complex and detailed: from the towers and bunkers where rich humans live to the slums of the poor and uninhabitable deadzones. The characters are a mix of colours and nationalities, denoting the chaos and integration after the Border Wars. Give the number of characters it's impressive that there was never any confusion as to who the reader is following at any given time. Having said that, there's little opportunity to get to know characters, so the reader is constantly told things about each character with no opportunity to see the truth of these statements in their actions. The book takes place over a short period of time, making character development a moot point. As with James Knapp's Revivors trilogy, you have to pay close attention to what's going on. Ruiz repeats several important points which, given your frame of mind, are either helpful or irritating over time. Similarly, if you liked the action and spunk of Those Who Walk in Darkness by John Ridley, you'll love Mind Storm. This is the first book of the series and is ultimately merely set-up for what comes next. But what a set-up! Like X-Men, only more brutal.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nora

    Confession: I almost didn't read Mind Storm. I'm really picky when it comes to science fiction; I don't have the brain to appreciate it. Give me aliens and shiny tech and badass weapons, just don't expect me to understand how it all came to be. The second an author starts describing tech or going a little too in-depth in the science of it all, I go catatonic in self-defense. MIND STORM does that because it has to. The first part (of nine, technically eight because nine is one page long) lays a lot Confession: I almost didn't read Mind Storm. I'm really picky when it comes to science fiction; I don't have the brain to appreciate it. Give me aliens and shiny tech and badass weapons, just don't expect me to understand how it all came to be. The second an author starts describing tech or going a little too in-depth in the science of it all, I go catatonic in self-defense. MIND STORM does that because it has to. The first part (of nine, technically eight because nine is one page long) lays a lot of groundwork. You meet the major characters and get an idea of the stakes, but you also meet the world and some of the tech it carries, because society as it is now is critical to the plot. I saw the words vidscreens and hologrids and nuerotrackers and was like O HELL I CANNOT DO THIS WHERE IS MY COLORING BOOK. But I persevered, and damn, am I glad I did. KM pulls you into the Strykers world, Hi, Welcome to the Future, and then smiles and says, Isn't it Ugly? This is the world 250 years after a nuclear holocaust. This is what society has become. It's utterly believable, underscored with desperation and desolation. MIND STORM is fast-paced, complicated, and brutal. Is it violent? Of course it is--this is war. This is the survival of a ruined planet and a dying specie. Things are going to get nasty because there is far too much at stake for any side to give up quietly. But don't cover your eyes--you don't want to miss a single moment.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Thom

    Reads like a screenplay (or maybe a role playing game?) at times; many characters and most of them bloody ruthless. The main character (according to the blurb) disappears early on and hasn't come back yet. Instead, the story jumps through multiple other characters, none of them likeable. The world and plot are really convoluted and hard to follow. This is the author's first novel, and the first part of a duology (or perhaps a series). She is not credited with any other writing, and seems to have Reads like a screenplay (or maybe a role playing game?) at times; many characters and most of them bloody ruthless. The main character (according to the blurb) disappears early on and hasn't come back yet. Instead, the story jumps through multiple other characters, none of them likeable. The world and plot are really convoluted and hard to follow. This is the author's first novel, and the first part of a duology (or perhaps a series). She is not credited with any other writing, and seems to have disappeared from the internet. This book has been on my reading list since 2013, and was very difficult to find. I have abandoned this book roughly 25% of the way through.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tommy

    A first novel of a series, with an interesting cast characters and a complex set of abilities. Without realizing it was the first of a series, I was hoping to find more resolution by the end of the book. While there is a certain amount of determination, many ideas and threads are left unwoven to be completed later. Who is Aisling? What is Threnody's role? How are they gonna get away with it all?! I enjoyed the read, but be prepared for some serious violence, death, and occasional profanity. Lookin A first novel of a series, with an interesting cast characters and a complex set of abilities. Without realizing it was the first of a series, I was hoping to find more resolution by the end of the book. While there is a certain amount of determination, many ideas and threads are left unwoven to be completed later. Who is Aisling? What is Threnody's role? How are they gonna get away with it all?! I enjoyed the read, but be prepared for some serious violence, death, and occasional profanity. Looking forward to the next!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brian Taylor

    I went into this book knowing only that it involved mutants and it was K. M. Ruiz’s debut. I don’t know if I’m unlike most readers, but I didn’t give a thought to the quotes on the cover. While I can appreciate the endorsements, I don’t want to be influenced by another’s reading experience. I want to go into any book I read with a clean slate and let the author make or break my reading experience with their characters, world, and words. And I think that’s where a lot of readers get hung up, on t I went into this book knowing only that it involved mutants and it was K. M. Ruiz’s debut. I don’t know if I’m unlike most readers, but I didn’t give a thought to the quotes on the cover. While I can appreciate the endorsements, I don’t want to be influenced by another’s reading experience. I want to go into any book I read with a clean slate and let the author make or break my reading experience with their characters, world, and words. And I think that’s where a lot of readers get hung up, on the X-Men meets Blade Runner comparison. You see it time and time again in the reviews. Folks complain because Mind Storm wasn’t anything like X-Men. Don’t get hung up on the quotes, folks. Give this author a chance to spin her tale. You won’t be disappointed. And now a word from the publisher: The first in an exciting new sci-fi series that’s being described as Blade Runner meets X-Men Two hundred and fifty years after the world was nearly wiped out by nuclear war, what’s left of society fights over the scraps of the Earth as the rich and powerful plan to ascend in secret to another planet. But the deadly new breed of humanity that the rulers have enslaved to protect their interests are about to change everything. K.M. Ruiz’s Mind Storm is the rip-roaring tale of Threnody Corwin, a “psion” with the ability to channel electricity like lightning through anything she touches. As a solider-slave for the human government, Threnody is recruited by an unknown enemy: the scion of Earth’s most powerful (and supposedly human) family, the Serca Syndicate. But Lucas Serca is far from human and he intends to make Threnody and her fellow psions meet their destiny, no matter how many people he has to kill to do it. Mind Storm is the first of two books chronicling the fight for survival by the psions and other “gene-trash” humans, before they’re killed by the racist world government, or left to die on a crumbling Earth. War is hell. So is what comes after… I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was something different, a bit of freshness that the Sci-Fi genre needs from time to time. For that alone I applaud K. M. Ruiz. But we’d be doing her book a disservice if we only classify it as Sci-Fi. Mind Storm is something of a genre mash up, at least in my opinion it is. Take a Sci-Fi setting, fill it with the action and intrigue you’d find in a Thriller, and add to that the multiple POV system often utilized in the Fantasy genre, and you’ve got the recipe for what makes Mind Storm a memorable read. What stands out to me most is the world in which these psions live. Set a couple hundred years in the future, they either serve the government or are branded a renegade and hunted down. Even though the psions have mutated and developed powers over various elements like fire or electricity, telekinesis or telepathy (to name a few), they don’t have much to live for. They are often taken by the government at a very early age and programmed to serve obediently, or die. Most of their lives are spent knowing a few mistakes can lead to a push of a button and their subsequent deaths. I found this to be very believable in a world where the remnants of the human race are clinging to life years after nuclear war has ravaged the planet. The psions are like the government’s dogs. They go and do what they’re told to do and are thrown away when they’re not needed anymore. Got some dirty work? Send in the psions! Much of this book is told through multiple POVs, which a story of this magnitude needs. It gives readers a more complete picture, and vision, of a society that is just barely hanging on. Plus we get to see each side of the equation. There really aren’t any clear cut good, or bad, guys here. Various shades of grey rule the day with these characters left to choose what they believe is the best course of action. I quite liked that. When the chips are down and everything is going to hell, each character had to look deep within themselves and find their motivation. Sometimes their motivations gelled with other characters. Sometimes they didn’t. K. M. Ruiz has the makings of a master storyteller. Hers is a voice I want to hear more from in this, or any genre. And if she ever needs a critique partner, or someone to bounce ideas off of, I’m more than available. Just throwing that out there. I did have a few minor gripes. There were times when action sequences felt stymied by unnecessary narrative, where the author was trying to explain things instead of letting the action unfold. It took me away from what should have been meaningful action, and plot points. A few of the characters read the same way too, meaning if their names weren’t different you wouldn’t know you were reading about two different characters. Nothing major. I would have like to see a little more death too. I suppose I’ll have to wait and see if I get my wish in the sequel. Fingers crossed! All-in-all, I applaud K. M. Ruiz’s debut. She managed to inject new life in a genre that often needs it. I would describe Mind Storm as a stylish, sophisticated, and gritty read, one you don’t want to miss. How’s that for an endorsement? I’m giving K. M. Ruiz’s, Mind Storm, four out of five stars. I will definitely buy the second book and be on the lookout for whatever she has planned next. It isn’t often you find a debut as polished and intelligent as this. Readers of all walks will find something to love with this book. Do yourself a favor and grab a copy. Then you can rave about K. M. Ruiz too!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Snail in Danger (Sid) Nicolaides

    I saw the sequel to this in my library and was curious. The heroine's name is Threnody Corwin ... that's a hefty name to hang on any protagonist, but especially an SF/F protagonist, because of Amber. It felt too much like a first novel, and too Action Girl fanservice-ish for me to want to read right now. I saw the sequel to this in my library and was curious. The heroine's name is Threnody Corwin ... that's a hefty name to hang on any protagonist, but especially an SF/F protagonist, because of Amber. It felt too much like a first novel, and too Action Girl fanservice-ish for me to want to read right now.

  11. 4 out of 5

    K.F.

    So I'm actually reading the two books together, which I never realized was two books. But I finally got through the first, which I think is an achievement. But solid writing, cool world building, and it's without exposition but in a non confusing way. It's just really really long to get through. But if you stick with it, it feels very satisfying. So I'm actually reading the two books together, which I never realized was two books. But I finally got through the first, which I think is an achievement. But solid writing, cool world building, and it's without exposition but in a non confusing way. It's just really really long to get through. But if you stick with it, it feels very satisfying.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paradoxical

    The thing is, Mind Storm isn't Threnody's story, like the book jacket claims. Instead, Mind Storm is a hugely plot driven story that has a myriad cast of characters, all of whom get a moment in the spotlight, as the POV switches frequently among the cast. Only a small portion of the book truly focuses on Threnody, though she is integral to the plot. There are, however, several people more important to the plot than she (or at least, this far into the series), chief among them being Lucas and Ais The thing is, Mind Storm isn't Threnody's story, like the book jacket claims. Instead, Mind Storm is a hugely plot driven story that has a myriad cast of characters, all of whom get a moment in the spotlight, as the POV switches frequently among the cast. Only a small portion of the book truly focuses on Threnody, though she is integral to the plot. There are, however, several people more important to the plot than she (or at least, this far into the series), chief among them being Lucas and Aisling, though you hardly meet Aisling at all. To break down Mind Storm is a bit complicated. The characters live in a post-apocalyptic world, where those deemed 'pure' humans (those without any genetic mutation for at least five generations) are Registered and they hold all of the power among them. The government controls a large numbers of soldiers; people whom they don't consider even human, all of whom hold various powers--psions. These psions are slaves, and those that disobey or attempt to rebel are killed remotely (each psion has an implant in the back of their head that could kill them at any moment). However, the government doesn't control all of the psions. The government wants to go to Mars and leave behind all whom they deem unworthy (psions and other impure humans), but there is limited amounts of space available, and so this plan is only known among the upper echelons. They believe there is no future on such a ravaged earth, and so seek to escape to the terraformed colony. Then there is the Serca Syndicate, the world's most powerful family. Lucas is the rogue son of said family, and he is attempting a rebellion of sorts, where he follows the words of a precog girl (Aisling), who lived years prior to the events in the book. He has his own plans, and attempts to save earth and the crumbling humanity. However, do not mistake him as noble or any such thing--the world of Mind Storm is so hard, so brutal, that nobody in the books--save, perhaps, Aisling--is clean. They all kill, cheat, lie, and ruthlessly attempt to outdo one another, thinking little of the people they trample who are in their way. Manipulation is something they just do, and all to further each of their plans. I'm not a fan of multiple POV switching, let me get that out first. I actually hate it, and the fact that Mind Storm made such a thing bearable for me was a surprise. But it was just that, bearable. Every few pages the POV switched to another character, another plot thread that was chased by the author, and, as a reader, I never felt all that connected to any of the characters. Granted, Mind Storm is definitely a plot driven book. Character growth is a low, low priority, and you really can't get attached to any of the characters as they are. I prefer my books to have a good balance between character and plot, and the fact that Mind Storm leaned so heavily towards plot made me give negative points on that aspect. I like to feel attached to characters. In this book, I was left feeling rather cold about it all. The beginning is a bit heavy, a bit clumsy. It was difficult keeping my mind on the book, to keep reading it, though it eventually smoothed out and became fine to read. Immersion into the world is difficult at first, perhaps because the world of Mind Storm is so different from ours. The author has to get the reader immersed into the story, and that's always difficult to do in the beginning when the reader goes in blind. On the upside, I did get into the world eventually, and reading became rather fast paced. Perhaps what bothered me most about the book is how horrible just about everyone is. You expect it in a post-apocalyptic book to some degree, but in Mind Storm it's all about how to stay one step ahead of the enemy, how to keep on surviving against heavily stacked odds. It gave it a sense of gritty realism, but definitely did not endear itself to me. People are awful in this book--there is no real 'good' group, there's only survival and the race to accomplish their goals. The goal for Lucas might be a noble one, but he manipulates people without care, and kills them just as easily. It makes caring about his goal difficult, even if it's the best result out of the ones presented. There is also this sense of inevitability. Aisling is a precog of enormous powers, who apparently has guided Lucas in his goals because his goal is the same as hers--the survival of earth and the humans left on it. Everything goes along with Aislings plans, for if they don't, then it pretty much spells end game for Lucas and his group. There really isn't much wiggle room there--if Aisling is wrong, then they'd be dead, and Lucas says something to that degree. It bothered me how nobody had any real freedom; that Threnody, the titular main character, has spent her life as a slave, and then gets scooped up by Lucas and is, essentially, a slave once again. She has no choice in any of the events, she can only react and not contribute. It's really rather frustrating to read. That isn't so say that Mind Storm is a bad book, because it isn't. Aside from the rocky beginning, it flows well, the characters have distinct voices, there's a lot of action, and the plot is rather gripping. It's also written well. It just isn't really my sort of book. I still liked it, but I didn't love it. I enjoyed reading it, but I didn't have any attachment to any of the characters except for Aisling, who you only meet for a few pages. The characters do the things they do because they have no other choice, because otherwise they'd be dead or just as bad, and that's understandable, even if I don't fully like it. The world is etched out very nicely--you get a real sense of what has happened, what is happening, and how life is for various people. Once past the initial bump, you can immerse yourself quite easily into the world. So, long review finally ending, I'm at a bit of a crossroads with the novel. It's brutal and terrible, but it fits, and that's exactly how it should be. It's just not exactly my cup of tea, especially with all of the POV switching. Overall, I'm giving it 3 stars out of 5. A solid book that I enjoyed reading for the most part, but couldn't bring myself to love.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Aristotle

    Noah's Ark A good first book from Ruiz. Took a little time to figure out all the characters. The Serca family Strykers Warhound Psion type and class World Court and who was fighting who. She painted a grim post apocalyptic world and the struggle to survive. Where good vs evil, right vs wrong, light vs darkness was not easy to separate. Noah's Ark A good first book from Ruiz. Took a little time to figure out all the characters. The Serca family Strykers Warhound Psion type and class World Court and who was fighting who. She painted a grim post apocalyptic world and the struggle to survive. Where good vs evil, right vs wrong, light vs darkness was not easy to separate.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    If there's one word that's overused by reviewers of sci-fi oriented fiction it has to be the word "accessible," but it's an almost necessary evil for those of us who are scientifically illiterate. That said, please don't think I mean to imply that "Mind Storm" is lacking in complexity because I would include the word accessible in its description-- many of my favorite books, including "Old Man's War," share that quality and I consider it a mark of a good author to take intricate ideas and presen If there's one word that's overused by reviewers of sci-fi oriented fiction it has to be the word "accessible," but it's an almost necessary evil for those of us who are scientifically illiterate. That said, please don't think I mean to imply that "Mind Storm" is lacking in complexity because I would include the word accessible in its description-- many of my favorite books, including "Old Man's War," share that quality and I consider it a mark of a good author to take intricate ideas and present them in a way that appeals to a wide array of readers and K.M. Ruiz does exactly that in "Mind Storm." The official synopsis of "Mind Storm" references "Blade Runner" and "X-Men" and it's fair to say that the story has elements that may borrow, just a little bit, from both stories. But "Mind Storm" leaves behind most similarities pretty quickly as it establishes its own framework. The psions in Ruiz's world aren't mutants in the same sense as the X-Men, though their powers are a result of mutations that occur after a nuclear war that devastates the planet. The psions are integrated, by force of a brain implant with the power to kill, into the Stryker Syndicate and required to protect and fight for a human majority that would wipe out all the psions if they weren't so useful. Their powers run the gamut of telekinesis, pyrokinesis, telepathy, empathy and precognition-- or a combination of two or more powers (though this is rare) but their powers are dangerous and generally limit the lifespan of a psion to half that of a normal human. Initially I was afraid that the characterizations in "Mind Storm" were going to be somewhat stereotypical as some of the early scenes with members of the Serca family are a bit heavy-handed in portraying them as power hungry, heartless and needlessly cruel. But when Lucas Serca enters the story the character development hits its stride and his interactions with Threnody and the other Strykers bring the depth the early chapters were lacking and by the time I was halfway through the book I was hooked. Ruiz does an excellent job of layering the story by telling it from the viewpoint of several characters including a mysterious child named Aisling whose precognition seems to be the main force behind Lucas' actions. Hints are dropped along the way but the main motivations of the Serca family aren't revealed until later in the book and the action ramps up to keep pace with each revelation. The technology is well thought out and lends itself to some great clashes between Threnody and her group of Strykers and the Serca Warhounds. There were times when I wondered if it would be possible for someone to (theoretically) be powerful enough to shear the wings off a jet with the power of their mind, but it's a small consideration when weighed against the tightly woven plotting that keeps the suspense up all the way to the end of the book. Reading "Mind Storm" made me remember how much I enjoy a good sci-fi novel. Too often I convince myself that fantasy is easier to follow than science fiction, but "Mind Storm" shows that convincing tech is often better than fuzzy magic when it comes to creating realistic super powered characters. "Mind Storm" does finish with a bit of a cliff-hanger ending; thankfully the second half of Ruiz's duology Terminal Point has already been released and I can't wait to see how the story ends.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Twenty years after the child prophet Aisling foresaw the future the human mutant psions, Threnody Corwin and her partner Quinton Martinez are dispatched to what remains of Los Angeles, now known as ‘The Slums of the Angels’ on a suicide mission for failing to obey orders on Corwin’s last mission. The two are part of the Strykers Syndicate, enslaved solders contracted out on the most dangerous missions. Psions came in various class and strengths, armed with telepathic strengths with the ability to Twenty years after the child prophet Aisling foresaw the future the human mutant psions, Threnody Corwin and her partner Quinton Martinez are dispatched to what remains of Los Angeles, now known as ‘The Slums of the Angels’ on a suicide mission for failing to obey orders on Corwin’s last mission. The two are part of the Strykers Syndicate, enslaved solders contracted out on the most dangerous missions. Psions came in various class and strengths, armed with telepathic strengths with the ability to teleport at a moment’s notice. This time they were to hunt down and eliminate Lucas, the rogue son of Nathan Serca, a high-level, gene-trash human who was posing as a genetically-registered human. Serca, who was in charge of gathering the humans for a journey on the Arc to Mars. Earth was seriously depleted of all its natural resources after The Border Wars. The World Court convened and decided who is worthy to travel to the colony and Earth will be left to the mutants and unregistered masses. Lucas has another plan in mind, rescuing those that deserve to be, those who will make this world a better place. Once he can arrange to have the neurotrackers cut out of the necks of the four Strykers he recruits, once he convinces them that his powers and skill levels are superior to theirs, they take on the project of protecting the followers Lucas has gathered together. Serca pulls out all stops to get the remaining Strykers to bring in the fallen four and a pitch battle over human rights on Earth takes place during the twenty-fourth century. With the help of matron they raid the Gene Bank and the Seed Bank in an effort to save humankind. Will the destiny that Ailing prophesized come to pass or was it just the ramblings of mad child?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    There are many really good things about this story: the well-crafted post apocalyptic world, the super powered psions, the politics, the cover ups, the rich and various conflicts that keep you turning pages. But as many other reviewers have already pointed out, there is a critical flaw in how the main character is dealt with - and that is, barely at all. Threnody Corwin is described as the main character, but the number of pages where we actually spend time with her are very small. The author set There are many really good things about this story: the well-crafted post apocalyptic world, the super powered psions, the politics, the cover ups, the rich and various conflicts that keep you turning pages. But as many other reviewers have already pointed out, there is a critical flaw in how the main character is dealt with - and that is, barely at all. Threnody Corwin is described as the main character, but the number of pages where we actually spend time with her are very small. The author sets up the potential for a rich character with a difficult history who is slowly beginning to spit back the propaganda she was fed all her life. It would have been great, if only we actually got to see that happening. But we are only briefly told about it, and then the story rolls on right over Threnody's head. The moment where Threnody makes her big sacrifice feels sadly meaningless, when it could have been chock full of emotion. We spend much more page time with a variety of other characters, all of whom get that same tantalizing character set up that Threnody had, some of them getting much more of their character actively fleshed out for us. If I had been in charge of marketing this book, I would have billed the Serca children as the stars. If I had been involved in the editing of this book, I would have encouraged the author to focus on the clashing personalities within this super-powered insane family drama. It's like an incredibly creepy soap opera on steroids and I was eating it up. In the end, I would recommend this book for the Sercas, and just caution readers to toss aside the jacket suggestion that Threnody is the main character.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Wow. This book was beyond expectations. I found this book because the sequel was on the Science Fiction / Mystery Recommended at the library. I thought that looked interesting until I saw there was a book that came before it so "sight-unseen" I borrowed this book. I highly recommend this book to people who like Science Fiction or Post-Apocalyptic events. It is both and more, though the inside jacket does not do a good job of explaining either the plot or the main characters. This is a book about p Wow. This book was beyond expectations. I found this book because the sequel was on the Science Fiction / Mystery Recommended at the library. I thought that looked interesting until I saw there was a book that came before it so "sight-unseen" I borrowed this book. I highly recommend this book to people who like Science Fiction or Post-Apocalyptic events. It is both and more, though the inside jacket does not do a good job of explaining either the plot or the main characters. This is a book about psions who evolved around the time that all the nations on Earth decided to bomb each other. Though there is a reason for this aggression, it is not explained until later - and the build up completely works!! These psions are slaves to the world government and thus the bidding of "registered" humans - those who can claim untainted DNA for 5 generations. Into this world we are introduced to four slave-psions and Lucas, the son of one of the most famous registered humans on Earth - who is also a psion! It just so happens that Lucas is a psion too, and to add some complication he is on a mission to save the world guided by a little girl who lived 250 years before and was a powerful precog. I don't want to say more because that would just make the reading less enjoyable. Anyway, I loved the characters, and they were true to their nature. Descriptions were lovely and poignant. I can't wait to read the next novel!!!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    ILoveBooks

    In this post-nuclear world, the author creates a new race of people (psions) whose radiation-altered genes give them super-human abilities such as telekinesis, telepathy, teleportation, electro kinesis, and even precognition. Many of these psions (the Strykers Syndicate), including Threnody, have become the willing slaves of pure-gene humans. The psions even allow devices to be inserted into their heads which will kill them instantly at the order of the human World Court. How unlikely is that? T In this post-nuclear world, the author creates a new race of people (psions) whose radiation-altered genes give them super-human abilities such as telekinesis, telepathy, teleportation, electro kinesis, and even precognition. Many of these psions (the Strykers Syndicate), including Threnody, have become the willing slaves of pure-gene humans. The psions even allow devices to be inserted into their heads which will kill them instantly at the order of the human World Court. How unlikely is that? The author does make it believable because the psions have unfortunately shortened life spans in addition to their talents. Threnody and her teammates are slaves, but they are slaves who believe in the ideal of protecting and improving the lives of genetically pure people. That’s why the news that the human leaders are packing up the Global Seed and Gene Bank and leaving earth turns them into rogues. Threnody, who had ignored orders in order to save innocent lives in the past, is now willing to follow orders from violent Lucas who wantonly kills dozens just to create a diversion. This book is recommended for teens and up who usually enjoy sci-fi. Even if you don’t usually like the tech stuff - once you get past the first chapter - you might be hooked. 3 stars http://livetoread-krystal.blogspot.co...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Larry

    When I checked out Mind Storm from the library, I was dismayed by the author's bio, that of an early 20s, slightly goth-looking woman, and I almost put the book back. I am SO glad I didn't! This book is nonstop action and impossible to put down. Most impressive, I thought, was the author's ability to build her characters without slowing the action or plot down. Also, I am grateful the author didn't try to make a sub-plot of romance (which she had ample opportunity to if she had wanted to). KUDO When I checked out Mind Storm from the library, I was dismayed by the author's bio, that of an early 20s, slightly goth-looking woman, and I almost put the book back. I am SO glad I didn't! This book is nonstop action and impossible to put down. Most impressive, I thought, was the author's ability to build her characters without slowing the action or plot down. Also, I am grateful the author didn't try to make a sub-plot of romance (which she had ample opportunity to if she had wanted to). KUDOS Many reviewers downgraded their ranking of the book due to lack of character development yet later say there isn't a likeable character in the story. My take is if the characters evoke feelings from you (cheering for or rooting against) , the author has done a good job. This just happens to be a post-apocalyptic world where the good guys aren't really good, just less bad than the bad guys. The reader is not bogged down in unnecessarily detailed back story, and IMO, that is a good thing. Apparently other reviewers don't see it that way... As far as the storyline, it is superb and ends on a massive cliffhanger. I would rate this as the best debut novel of 2012 if not for The Rook. Ms Ruiz is definitely a talent to watch.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Mind-storm is a fast paced future world. The world is well developed, and you can really get a sense of what it would be like to live there. The story is told in a multi-person narrative, which makes it more difficult to really connect with the characters. I think when authors write this way, they think they are making a more suspenseful and complete story line, and while some of that is true, I never connect as well with the characters. One other problem I had with this book is that most people Mind-storm is a fast paced future world. The world is well developed, and you can really get a sense of what it would be like to live there. The story is told in a multi-person narrative, which makes it more difficult to really connect with the characters. I think when authors write this way, they think they are making a more suspenseful and complete story line, and while some of that is true, I never connect as well with the characters. One other problem I had with this book is that most people are disposable. There was one part that I thought illustrates this point, one of the characters walks into a room and kills 15 people in 3 seconds. The majority of these people are purely innocent bystanders who have no ability to fight back. It just leaves me feeling like what is the point in fighting for the future of humanity if we are going to kill them with no thoughts about them, and sometimes just to send a message. And these are the good guys. The book overall, is a very good at world building and overall, a good read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Natasha Reeves

    This was like a cross between the new TV show Alphas and a typical dystopian novel. Be warned right off, there's a lot of use of the F bomb in odd places which broke up the prose for me. But whatever, as long as you know. This book was a little confusing. So many different people with different names and different statuses and yet I still couldn't keep them all straight. The one off putting thing for me was the changing of P.O.V. because I had a hard time transitioning from each story. But they d This was like a cross between the new TV show Alphas and a typical dystopian novel. Be warned right off, there's a lot of use of the F bomb in odd places which broke up the prose for me. But whatever, as long as you know. This book was a little confusing. So many different people with different names and different statuses and yet I still couldn't keep them all straight. The one off putting thing for me was the changing of P.O.V. because I had a hard time transitioning from each story. But they do come together at the end. Sorta. This novel is more about the premise and less about characters. The only character that's really "fleshed out" (I mean that in the loosest sense) is Lucas. Everyone else, especially Threnody, was vague and underdeveloped. Not flat, just not important in the sense that you don't know backstories. You know what you need to know at the time. Which is fine, but too complex with too many loose ends. In the end, I am not entirely sure if I understood everything that happened. I will wait for the next book and see if I can make more sense of things.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rabya

    A captivating tale of a dystopian future where rogue mutants and scavenger humans fight to save humanity from being enslaved by a mutant syndicate and corrupt world government. In the aftermath of the Border Wars, nuclear contamination created human mutants, or psions, who can engage in psychic warfare. Psions are either enslaved by the human world government to work as "Strykers" (yes, with a "y"), or captured by the Serca Syndicate to work as "Warhounds." The book definitely picks up speed fai A captivating tale of a dystopian future where rogue mutants and scavenger humans fight to save humanity from being enslaved by a mutant syndicate and corrupt world government. In the aftermath of the Border Wars, nuclear contamination created human mutants, or psions, who can engage in psychic warfare. Psions are either enslaved by the human world government to work as "Strykers" (yes, with a "y"), or captured by the Serca Syndicate to work as "Warhounds." The book definitely picks up speed fairly quickly and I stayed up late to finish it, however I was a little let down by an ending that was really more of a beginning for another book to continue the story. The narrative was a bit disjointed, as the main character focus shifted about half way through the story. Nonetheless, I hope the future books in this series will keep up the adrenaline pace. An impressive science fiction debut for Ms. Ruiz. I was definitely inspired by rave reviews to read this book, and was not disappointed.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    This book was the first book I was ever sent to review, so it holds quite a soft spot for me. At first I Was a little iffy about it because science fiction is not really my thing, I had put it off for a while because I had other books to read. When I finally got down to it I thought why did I wait so long!? Usually when I read science fiction I'm lost, I get so confused with all the science of it and it loses my attention real fast. Thankfully this book wasn't like that and I was able to read th This book was the first book I was ever sent to review, so it holds quite a soft spot for me. At first I Was a little iffy about it because science fiction is not really my thing, I had put it off for a while because I had other books to read. When I finally got down to it I thought why did I wait so long!? Usually when I read science fiction I'm lost, I get so confused with all the science of it and it loses my attention real fast. Thankfully this book wasn't like that and I was able to read through it without a problem. At first I was confused with the names and I had to keep thinking ok..who is this person? But once I got passed that it was all good. I wasn't aware it was a series when I first finished and it left me kinda like...what? But now I know its a series I can't wait for the future books!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    I had high hopes for this book: "Ooh, just like X-Men in book form", I thought. I was somewhat disappointed. Parts of it are very creative and well-thought-out, but the premise of all these superhumans being enslaved and marginalized (while at the same time quietly considering themselves superior) I found hard to rationalize. The politics of the book just doesn't make sense to me. The quasi-romantic but continually sterile relationships in the book were confusing, too: okay, I wondered, are thes I had high hopes for this book: "Ooh, just like X-Men in book form", I thought. I was somewhat disappointed. Parts of it are very creative and well-thought-out, but the premise of all these superhumans being enslaved and marginalized (while at the same time quietly considering themselves superior) I found hard to rationalize. The politics of the book just doesn't make sense to me. The quasi-romantic but continually sterile relationships in the book were confusing, too: okay, I wondered, are these characters supposed to be secretly in love or not? I don't mind either way, but it just seemed alternately suggestive and then bland, and that seemed like poor writing. The action is pretty good, though, so for a mindless post-apocalyptic action novel it's not bad. Just not my style. I'm not sure if I'll read the rest in the series, although parts of the larger story arc seem quite intriguing.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kalyn

    There are a lot of strengths in this novel but also some weaknesses that make this good but not great. The post-apocalyptic world is intriguing, there is political strife and conflict that adds to the story, and the types of "powers" that are present show up in new enough ways to be interesting. The world-building is well done here but this is a very complex world and it takes most of the book to figure out where all the pieces are in play and what the playing field looks like. The character bui There are a lot of strengths in this novel but also some weaknesses that make this good but not great. The post-apocalyptic world is intriguing, there is political strife and conflict that adds to the story, and the types of "powers" that are present show up in new enough ways to be interesting. The world-building is well done here but this is a very complex world and it takes most of the book to figure out where all the pieces are in play and what the playing field looks like. The character building isn't a strong point of this book, but with so much in play action-wise the story moves along without it. You can tell there is a lot more story to play out at the end of this one so I hope Ruiz can create more connection to the characters in the next book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cristov

    Earth has been shattered by nuclear war and the worldwide government that has risen from the ashes wants to start over but at a very heavy price. They only intend to save the purest genetics by escaping to Mars. An unlikely group of allies has other plans but the cost to achieve their plans will be paid in blood and pain. They have psionic powers on their side with everything from teleportation to empathic abilities to achieve their goals. While I would like some deeper character development in Earth has been shattered by nuclear war and the worldwide government that has risen from the ashes wants to start over but at a very heavy price. They only intend to save the purest genetics by escaping to Mars. An unlikely group of allies has other plans but the cost to achieve their plans will be paid in blood and pain. They have psionic powers on their side with everything from teleportation to empathic abilities to achieve their goals. While I would like some deeper character development in some areas, Mind Storm overall is a success. Ruiz carefully unfolds details in constantly building ride that leaves your heart pounding by the end. I look forward to the sequel.

  27. 5 out of 5

    David

    There's lots of things wrong with this novel. The most important is that there is no protagonist. Plently of interchangable and unlikable characters, but there's no one to tell the story. There's no emotion. It has no heart. You're immediately plopped down into a bit confusing world and it looks like we're introduced to a protagonist named Threnody but she then disappears for most of the novel. It's an ugly, bitter future distopia filled with ugly, bitter psions and humans. I read about 190 page There's lots of things wrong with this novel. The most important is that there is no protagonist. Plently of interchangable and unlikable characters, but there's no one to tell the story. There's no emotion. It has no heart. You're immediately plopped down into a bit confusing world and it looks like we're introduced to a protagonist named Threnody but she then disappears for most of the novel. It's an ugly, bitter future distopia filled with ugly, bitter psions and humans. I read about 190 pages and had to stop.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Lundgren

    A YA/Adult Sci-fi book, set in the post-apocalyptic future of about 250 years, it's about a world lead by a strictly controlled world court, and a few powerful syndicates. After the bombs dropped some genetic code was altered, allowing for "psions," a group of people with powers, like telekinesis, empathy, telepathy, pyrokinesis, etc. There are two groups at odds with each other, and one rogue psion, who might be the most powerful of all. Part of a set I believe. Very entertaining, and she had s A YA/Adult Sci-fi book, set in the post-apocalyptic future of about 250 years, it's about a world lead by a strictly controlled world court, and a few powerful syndicates. After the bombs dropped some genetic code was altered, allowing for "psions," a group of people with powers, like telekinesis, empathy, telepathy, pyrokinesis, etc. There are two groups at odds with each other, and one rogue psion, who might be the most powerful of all. Part of a set I believe. Very entertaining, and she had some great battles between the psions. Lots of twists and turns and backstabbing, etc.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marita

    Very good potential! Too much dialogue in the first part which made me feel like I was listening to my teenage kids talking about video games... where I usually give up and go do something else! When the style switches to more of the narrative then the book is hard to put down and just when it gets good, it ends... I HATE LOOSE endings when the book cannot stand alone as a complete story. Makes one feel used and manipulated, that IS what this book is about! :)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Myron Brown

    Plot-driven book about psions with tremendous powers doing whatever it takes to save what those who will remain behind after the government decrees that pure humans will move to Mars. Interesting plotline but like others say, it's hard to get behind any one character. This is the first book in a series but there are a lot of unresolved plot elements at the end. Not all the pieces are in place for the main plot at this point. Plot-driven book about psions with tremendous powers doing whatever it takes to save what those who will remain behind after the government decrees that pure humans will move to Mars. Interesting plotline but like others say, it's hard to get behind any one character. This is the first book in a series but there are a lot of unresolved plot elements at the end. Not all the pieces are in place for the main plot at this point.

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