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1788 Novels (Study Guide): Mary: A Fiction, Emmeline

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This is nonfiction commentary. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Mary: a Fiction, Emmeline. Source: Wikipedia. Free updates online. Not illustrated. Excerpt: Mary: A Fiction is the first and only complete novel written by the eighteenth-century British feminis This is nonfiction commentary. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Mary: a Fiction, Emmeline. Source: Wikipedia. Free updates online. Not illustrated. Excerpt: Mary: A Fiction is the first and only complete novel written by the eighteenth-century British feminist Mary Wollstonecraft. It tells the tragic story of a heroine's successive "romantic friendships" with a woman and a man. Composed while Wollstonecraft was a governess in Ireland, the novel was published in 1788 shortly after her summary dismissal and her momentous decision to embark on a writing career, a precarious and disreputable profession for women in eighteenth-century Britain. Inspired by Jean-Jacques Rousseau's idea that geniuses are self-taught, Wollstonecraft chose a rational, self-taught heroine, Mary, as the central character of her novel. Helping to redefine genius (a word which at the end of the eighteenth century was only beginning to take on its modern meaning of exceptional or brilliant), Wollstonecraft describes Mary as independent and capable of defining femininity and marriage for herself. It is Mary's "strong, original opinions" and her resistance to "conventional wisdom" that mark her as a genius. Making her heroine a genius allowed Wollstonecraft to criticize marriage as well: geniuses were "enchained" rather than enriched by marriage. Through this heroine Wollstonecraft also critiques eighteenth-century sensibility and its damaging effects on women. Mary rewrites the traditional romance plot through its reimagination of gender relations and female sexuality. Yet, because Wollstonecraft employs the genre of sentimentalism to critique sentimentalism itself, her "fiction," as she labels it, sometimes reflects the same flaws of sentimentalism that she is attempting to expose. Wollstonecraft later repudiated Mary, writing that it was lau...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=845557


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This is nonfiction commentary. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Mary: a Fiction, Emmeline. Source: Wikipedia. Free updates online. Not illustrated. Excerpt: Mary: A Fiction is the first and only complete novel written by the eighteenth-century British feminis This is nonfiction commentary. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Mary: a Fiction, Emmeline. Source: Wikipedia. Free updates online. Not illustrated. Excerpt: Mary: A Fiction is the first and only complete novel written by the eighteenth-century British feminist Mary Wollstonecraft. It tells the tragic story of a heroine's successive "romantic friendships" with a woman and a man. Composed while Wollstonecraft was a governess in Ireland, the novel was published in 1788 shortly after her summary dismissal and her momentous decision to embark on a writing career, a precarious and disreputable profession for women in eighteenth-century Britain. Inspired by Jean-Jacques Rousseau's idea that geniuses are self-taught, Wollstonecraft chose a rational, self-taught heroine, Mary, as the central character of her novel. Helping to redefine genius (a word which at the end of the eighteenth century was only beginning to take on its modern meaning of exceptional or brilliant), Wollstonecraft describes Mary as independent and capable of defining femininity and marriage for herself. It is Mary's "strong, original opinions" and her resistance to "conventional wisdom" that mark her as a genius. Making her heroine a genius allowed Wollstonecraft to criticize marriage as well: geniuses were "enchained" rather than enriched by marriage. Through this heroine Wollstonecraft also critiques eighteenth-century sensibility and its damaging effects on women. Mary rewrites the traditional romance plot through its reimagination of gender relations and female sexuality. Yet, because Wollstonecraft employs the genre of sentimentalism to critique sentimentalism itself, her "fiction," as she labels it, sometimes reflects the same flaws of sentimentalism that she is attempting to expose. Wollstonecraft later repudiated Mary, writing that it was lau...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=845557

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