web site hit counter The Terror of History: Mystics, Heretics, and Witches in the Western Tradition - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Terror of History: Mystics, Heretics, and Witches in the Western Tradition

Availability: Ready to download

24 lectures, 30 minutes/lecture) Course No. 893 Western civilization is closely associated with reason and science, and with exceptional accomplishment in art, architecture, music, and literature. Yet it has also been characterized by widespread belief in the supernatural and the irrationalwith mystics who have visions of the divine, and with entire movements of people who 24 lectures, 30 minutes/lecture) Course No. 893 Western civilization is closely associated with reason and science, and with exceptional accomplishment in art, architecture, music, and literature. Yet it has also been characterized by widespread belief in the supernatural and the irrationalwith mystics who have visions of the divine, and with entire movements of people who wait in fervent anticipation of the apocalypse. In addition, Western culture has been the setting for repeated acts of barbarism: persecutions of certain groups such as Jews, or accused heretics and witches. Why has this been the case? This two-part series invites you to consider what might be called the "underbelly" of Western society, a complex mixture of deeply embedded beliefs and unsettling social forces that has given rise to our greatest saints and our most shameful acts. The "terror of history," according to Professor Teofilo F. Ruiz, is a deeply held beliefdating from the ancient Greeks to Nietzsche and beyondthat the world is essentially about disorder and emptiness, and that human beings live constantly on the edge of doom. We see history as terrifying, so we try to escape it. One strategy is to withdraw through transcendental experiences. Another, unfortunately, is to shift our fears onto scapegoats such as lepers, nonconformists, and other outsiders whom we choose to blame for "the catastrophe of our existence," as Professor Ruiz puts it.


Compare

24 lectures, 30 minutes/lecture) Course No. 893 Western civilization is closely associated with reason and science, and with exceptional accomplishment in art, architecture, music, and literature. Yet it has also been characterized by widespread belief in the supernatural and the irrationalwith mystics who have visions of the divine, and with entire movements of people who 24 lectures, 30 minutes/lecture) Course No. 893 Western civilization is closely associated with reason and science, and with exceptional accomplishment in art, architecture, music, and literature. Yet it has also been characterized by widespread belief in the supernatural and the irrationalwith mystics who have visions of the divine, and with entire movements of people who wait in fervent anticipation of the apocalypse. In addition, Western culture has been the setting for repeated acts of barbarism: persecutions of certain groups such as Jews, or accused heretics and witches. Why has this been the case? This two-part series invites you to consider what might be called the "underbelly" of Western society, a complex mixture of deeply embedded beliefs and unsettling social forces that has given rise to our greatest saints and our most shameful acts. The "terror of history," according to Professor Teofilo F. Ruiz, is a deeply held beliefdating from the ancient Greeks to Nietzsche and beyondthat the world is essentially about disorder and emptiness, and that human beings live constantly on the edge of doom. We see history as terrifying, so we try to escape it. One strategy is to withdraw through transcendental experiences. Another, unfortunately, is to shift our fears onto scapegoats such as lepers, nonconformists, and other outsiders whom we choose to blame for "the catastrophe of our existence," as Professor Ruiz puts it.

30 review for The Terror of History: Mystics, Heretics, and Witches in the Western Tradition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gary Beauregard Bottomley

    The sociological and economical aspects of a society are as necessary as the typically taught political with the religious perspective of history for understanding. The period of time from 1100 CE to about 1692 are most relevant to today and this Great Course connects to why heterodoxy is necessary for understanding all of history. The educated elite needed to escape from the stifling bounds of the conforming orthodoxy and the mystics provided a path. Soon what was not orthodox, part of the stif The sociological and economical aspects of a society are as necessary as the typically taught political with the religious perspective of history for understanding. The period of time from 1100 CE to about 1692 are most relevant to today and this Great Course connects to why heterodoxy is necessary for understanding all of history. The educated elite needed to escape from the stifling bounds of the conforming orthodoxy and the mystics provided a path. Soon what was not orthodox, part of the stifling conforming norm, would come from the devil and scapegoats were required, oh to be an old widowed women with independent thought they were to be chosen to be the not holy and the scapegoats. It was not so much the inquisition that would blame the ‘witch’ as it would be the man who was impotent that night and remember seeing that old woman on the margins crossing his path the day before and besides seeing another suffer always makes one taller in one’s own eyes. False framing is always dangerous. When St. Teresa of Avila sees blueness, her only question is it of the devil or is it holy. Perhaps, she should have wondered if it was a figment of her mind, or the proverbial undigested piece of meat from last night’s dinner, but, unfortunately, her confessor would tell her it must be from Jesus since Teresa of Avila was saintly, a nun and knew only goodness. False framing leads to cults. The start of courtly love comes about in this time period. As the lecturer mentions there was a handbook that would say that if you are a gentlemen and if you happen upon a wench by all means take your liberties against her and rape her if you desire it, after all you are the gentlemen and she is not worthy of consideration. Disgusting right and you would think with today’s sensibilities we could never advocate such a person. You’d be wrong. We as a country did just that when 48% voted for somebody who said practically the same thing when he said ‘I grab them by the p*ssy, they expect it, I’m a star and they really want it from a star like me’. Scapegoats, false framing, and no regard for the personhood of another are all familiar within these lectures and seems to align with who we are today. In order to appreciate European history from 1100 to 1692 one needs a familiarity with the somewhat arcane topics covered in these lectures. Besides in the end, all history is fun to learn and just might help us from repeating the same mistakes of the past, but the brain dead cult worshippers of the fascist in the Whitehouse should just ignore this lecture series since they have no reason to grow since they already have certainty with their faith in their leader and his world of false framing, scapegoats and making the world great again, just like the handbook for courtly love would advocate.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jules

    Fabulous lecture series (24 30-minute lectures with outline for each lecture) about society, economics, politics, religion, prejudice, misogyny and the use/abuse of power in history.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    An interesting lecture series, but a bit different from what I was expecting. The title seems to suggest that the "terror of history" is all of these dark and dangerous movements or ideas, or at least the actions taken by or against the people behind them. And part of my inclination to listen to this came from a mention of it in the advertisements of a podcast on folklore and strange tales, which would sort of fit that interpretation. But in the very first lecture, the "terror of history" is ins An interesting lecture series, but a bit different from what I was expecting. The title seems to suggest that the "terror of history" is all of these dark and dangerous movements or ideas, or at least the actions taken by or against the people behind them. And part of my inclination to listen to this came from a mention of it in the advertisements of a podcast on folklore and strange tales, which would sort of fit that interpretation. But in the very first lecture, the "terror of history" is instead defined as something like the anxiety people feel from being aware of their position in history, an anxiety from which many flee, a process which can generate things like heretical movements or mysticism. It really sounds like a sort of 20th-century existentialist philosophical concern, more so than something relevant to the period of European history covered (approximately 1000 to 1700). And sometimes it almost felt like the professor forgot his own definition, and talked about the "terror of history" as though it were actually all of the grim and brutal things that we know happened in the past, rather than idea he first describes. There is a lot of interesting ground covered in these lectures, and some of it touched on things I've encountered in other lecture series or in my own reading, and this helped give a new perspective on things and reinforce some ideas. One thing is I finally understood the idea of millennialism. In theory I already kind of got it since I've read some of the relevant material, but in practice the idea of the millennium has been so tied up with the calendrical millennium in popular culture that I overlooked how the biblical millennium refers to a thousand years of peace that are supposed to come after a period of great strife. So for example, a phrase like "The Millennium in the Sixteenth Century" (a title of one of the lectures) is not a contradiction. Although the professor is generally engaging, there are times when his statements are a bit too generalized or vague. One area that was particularly annoying was in a lecture titled "Hermeticism, Astrology, Alchemy, and Magic". In the lectures before it, the professor talked about how he was going to describe Hermeticism in a later lecture, and in a following lecture he said that he spent the majority of a lecture describing it. And I think it did technically have more time devoted to it than any one of the other topics in that lecture, but I was left not really understanding it. It seems to be some mix of magic, astrology, and lore, but it is hard to see how it is distinct from those topics on their own, and it sadly didn't match the hype he seemed to give to it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Delaine Youngblood

    This fascinating discussion of mystics, heretics, and witches sets those individuals and their followers within appropriate historical context. My daughter and I enjoyed this audio, and we look forward to listening to others.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Despite what the title suggests, this interesting (albeit uneven) series of lectures wasn’t about the terror of history as much as it was about the ways that people coped with that terror while they were living in the midst of it. The three topics were only loosely connected, but together they provided an interesting overview of three of the most important ways that ordinary people made sense of their world during the Middle Ages. In addition to providing the economic, political, and social conte Despite what the title suggests, this interesting (albeit uneven) series of lectures wasn’t about the terror of history as much as it was about the ways that people coped with that terror while they were living in the midst of it. The three topics were only loosely connected, but together they provided an interesting overview of three of the most important ways that ordinary people made sense of their world during the Middle Ages. In addition to providing the economic, political, and social context for each topic, the lecturer used a broad array of case studies and a wide range of source materials to create his lectures. The section on mysticism was probably the weakest, but Teofilo Ruiz found his stride by the section on heresy and the section of on witchcraft was absolutely brilliant. I really appreciated the fact that he didn’t hesitate to address the misogyny at the heart of the witch craze. Furthermore, although he spoke a little quickly at times, he was a knowledgeable and charismatic speaker overall. By their very nature, the Great Courses only provide an introduction to a topic (or topics, in this case), but it was a solid introduction and a solid foundation for future reading.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ophelia

    I guess the title alone told me plainly enough how broad this was going to be, but it was shallower than I expected. I just didn't learn a lot. Also I don't think I'll ever be able to forget the professor's absolutely bizarre, emphatic insistence that I had to have a clear understanding that in the seventeenth century any woman who lived to be forty years old would absolutely necessarily be a decrepit crone with "hanging breasts" and "almost all her teeth gone". That came almost at the end of the I guess the title alone told me plainly enough how broad this was going to be, but it was shallower than I expected. I just didn't learn a lot. Also I don't think I'll ever be able to forget the professor's absolutely bizarre, emphatic insistence that I had to have a clear understanding that in the seventeenth century any woman who lived to be forty years old would absolutely necessarily be a decrepit crone with "hanging breasts" and "almost all her teeth gone". That came almost at the end of the series and I almost wish he'd said something that mind-bogglingly dumb earlier so I could have skipped the rest. But really it wasn't bad -- I guess I just know more about the subject matter than I thought I did. Also he has a cool accent, so there was that.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Don Heiman

    In 2002 the Teaching Company released Professor Teofilio F. Ruiz’s 24 lectures audio course “The Terror of History: Mystics, Heretics, and Witches in the Western Tradition.” Teofilio is a National Humanities Award winning historian and an esteemed educator-author. His course traces the historical movements of mysticism and heretical judgements from the 1st to 17th century. His history culminates in the 1692 witch craft events in Salem, Massachusetts. He believes fear and uncertainties underpin a In 2002 the Teaching Company released Professor Teofilio F. Ruiz’s 24 lectures audio course “The Terror of History: Mystics, Heretics, and Witches in the Western Tradition.” Teofilio is a National Humanities Award winning historian and an esteemed educator-author. His course traces the historical movements of mysticism and heretical judgements from the 1st to 17th century. His history culminates in the 1692 witch craft events in Salem, Massachusetts. He believes fear and uncertainties underpin an historic terror that touches deeply our beliefs and way of life. (P)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Had a good time with this one. I learned lots At times, though, I had to listen rather closely because of the professor's accent. Also, it wasn't exactly what I thought based on a cursory reading of the title. I had thought that the "Terror" of history was simply the sort of stuff brought about by superstition and the Inquisition. This was not exactly what he meant. This is definitely an interesting one. I recommend it. Had a good time with this one. I learned lots At times, though, I had to listen rather closely because of the professor's accent. Also, it wasn't exactly what I thought based on a cursory reading of the title. I had thought that the "Terror" of history was simply the sort of stuff brought about by superstition and the Inquisition. This was not exactly what he meant. This is definitely an interesting one. I recommend it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Niki

    Sometimes the information could be repetitive, it is very interesting though. If you're already familiar with witch history, it might not give any new information. It's more of a 101 and for people who are just learning that witches "existed" or are historically relevant in society. Sometimes the information could be repetitive, it is very interesting though. If you're already familiar with witch history, it might not give any new information. It's more of a 101 and for people who are just learning that witches "existed" or are historically relevant in society.

  10. 5 out of 5

    عبد الله القصير

    مجموعة من الحاضرات الصوتية عن تاريخ الصوفية والمبتدعين والساحرات في أوروبا الغربية من عام 1000 ميلادي إلى نهاية القرن السابع عشر. لم يشد انتباهي بالكتاب إلا القسم الأخير الذي يتكلم فيه عن الساحرات.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Summerfire

    There were a few phrases he repeated - constantly. Sometime I couldn't focus on what he was saying, because of what he was saying. There were a few phrases he repeated - constantly. Sometime I couldn't focus on what he was saying, because of what he was saying.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nora MacLean

    It's a good and informative overview, I thoroughly enjoyed it. It's a good and informative overview, I thoroughly enjoyed it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    sardit

    Lots of interesting information that never quite congealed into a single topic. Part of that is the nature of audio learning for me? It’s better suited to broad overviews than exploring a thesis for me, and this is more the latter than the former. But I’m not convinced the thesis would have gelled even if I had read it rather than listened to it. Still, the information presented was fascinating.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Leah Clifford

    Super interesting and informative! I wish certain parts would have delved deeper, but it was 12 hours so... lol

  15. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    It’s amazing to me how impossible it is to consider history without drawing inevitable comparisons to the present, but I suppose that is exactly the point.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    These audio lectures are a combination of medieval (1000-1700 AD) history and philosophy that attempts to explain how those living during this time of social uncertainties and violence came to cope with it all. Prof Ruiz weaves together the dichotomy of views of the educated (able to read and write their views) with the largely illiterate 'masses' (those dealing with word-of-mouth half-truths and rumors). The explanation/descriptions of mystics, while a bit dry, laid the groundwork for understan These audio lectures are a combination of medieval (1000-1700 AD) history and philosophy that attempts to explain how those living during this time of social uncertainties and violence came to cope with it all. Prof Ruiz weaves together the dichotomy of views of the educated (able to read and write their views) with the largely illiterate 'masses' (those dealing with word-of-mouth half-truths and rumors). The explanation/descriptions of mystics, while a bit dry, laid the groundwork for understanding the heretics and finally the witches (and other social scapegoats) are mostly developed by the elite and only vaguely understood by the masses. People like Frances of Assisi, Hildegard of Bingen, and Bernard of Clairvaux (hardly names that roll easily off the tongue...at least my tongue) are shown to have had a very strong influence, not only in their time, but extending far into the 21st century (Dan Brown certainly draws heavily from those types of mystics). But did the masses even come close to understanding their messages, or were those larger-than-life figures just there to somehow bring meaning to their otherwise cruel life (Ruiz's Terror). The real 'meat' of the lectures, however, are the bad guys....the heretics and witches, which provide the masses someone/something to blame for their misery. Much like the masses saw the inquisition of heretics in the 15th century as a test of Christian faith, we see heretics today, mostly on the front pages of the newspapers..."Shiite/Sunni Strife Hits Middle East", or "Branch Davidians Die in Conflagration" (I made those headline up, but you get the idea). And we all know about the witch hunts in the 17th century (think Salem, especially with Halloween coming up) in which as many as 100,000 women (and men) died horrible deaths (burning or hanging) for no really good reason, other than somebody didn't like them. As Ruiz points out, how is that different from the "Red scare" of the 1950's or the current atrocities within Islam (aka beheading for religious disagreements). Oh my, there's a lot of meat here, with plenty left over for future food for thought! Good, not great lectures. Difficult at times (I needed to re-listen to several of the mystics lectures to really get it) but it pays off in the end. Recommend, but only when on sale and you have a coupon or two.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    Over the course of 24, 30-minute lectures, I expected some depth. Instead, what I got amounted to a very, very high-level and superficial overview. Ruiz is an engaging lecturer, aside from a few verbal annoyances ("in fact" "in a sense" "so to speak"). And he was even-handed in how he treated the history. But this would have been more powerful if he delved more deeply into drawing out the insightful, captivating themes (e.g., interaction between political changes and witchcraft; accusations of w Over the course of 24, 30-minute lectures, I expected some depth. Instead, what I got amounted to a very, very high-level and superficial overview. Ruiz is an engaging lecturer, aside from a few verbal annoyances ("in fact" "in a sense" "so to speak"). And he was even-handed in how he treated the history. But this would have been more powerful if he delved more deeply into drawing out the insightful, captivating themes (e.g., interaction between political changes and witchcraft; accusations of witchcraft relative to the power of the inquisition) instead of just a survey of thousands of years of history.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mario Russo

    Excellent course.. delves into the historical aspect of heresy, witches and mysticism in a broad scope in western middle ages.

  19. 4 out of 5

    βreηdaAηη

    Very enlightening. Read it many years ago, definitely worth coming back to.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    An enlightening read. It definitely changed my perspective and my approach to dealing with life's uncertainties. An enlightening read. It definitely changed my perspective and my approach to dealing with life's uncertainties.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Adam Lund

    No, it's not fear of going to history class. The terror of history is a creative look at history through the lens of marginalized and outcast individuals with non- traditional beliefs. No, it's not fear of going to history class. The terror of history is a creative look at history through the lens of marginalized and outcast individuals with non- traditional beliefs.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mt. Lebanon Public Library

    Laurie's Pick Call #: CD GREAT COURSES 133.43 Rui (audiobook) Laurie's Pick Call #: CD GREAT COURSES 133.43 Rui (audiobook)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Angelo John Lewis

    I'm enjoying it so far, although I don't agree with Professor Ruiz' thesis that the mystic experience is a reaction to what he calls "the terror of history." I'm enjoying it so far, although I don't agree with Professor Ruiz' thesis that the mystic experience is a reaction to what he calls "the terror of history."

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Simmons

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bill Johnston

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  28. 4 out of 5

    Haleygeek

  29. 5 out of 5

    Silvia

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alli

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.