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Placed in caves almost 2000 years ago and not discovered until 1947, the Dead Sea Scrolls provide a unique insight into Jewish and Christian origins. They have held a fascination over academics, religious leaders, and the lay public alike for the last forty-five years. From 1952, when a team of scholars was appointed and Cave 4 at Qumran was discovered - from which the mat Placed in caves almost 2000 years ago and not discovered until 1947, the Dead Sea Scrolls provide a unique insight into Jewish and Christian origins. They have held a fascination over academics, religious leaders, and the lay public alike for the last forty-five years. From 1952, when a team of scholars was appointed and Cave 4 at Qumran was discovered - from which the materials in this book are drawn - they have been under the control of an elite and secretive clique. However, in the autumn of 1991, this monopoly was effectively broken when the Huntington Library in California announced it would allow public access to its collection of Dead Sea Scrolls photographs. This was soon followed by the publication of a Facsimile Edition by the Biblical Archaeology Society in Washington D.C. Robert Eisenman was integrally involved in both events, and with Michael Wise had been working behind the scenes on the unpublished photographs for some time. Their discovery of a tiny Scroll fragment of six lines referring to the execution of or by a Messianic Leader plunged them into a long-running debate. Scholars previously controlling access to the Scrolls had been publically contending that there was nothing interesting in the remaining unpublished Scrolls and nothing throwing further light on Christianity's rise in Palestine. The conclusions of Professor Eisenman and Professor Wise gainsay and challenge these views. The present work is the result. For the first time the public will be able to see the most interesting and exciting texts from the unpublished corpus and judge for itself. Providing precise English translations and complete transcriptions into modern Hebrew characters, The Dead Sea Scrolls Uncovered makes generally available in a clear and accessible style fifty of the best texts. Accompanied by incisive and readable commentaries aimed at both lay person and scholar alike, these texts provide exciting and ground-breaking insights into Messianism, an alternative p


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Placed in caves almost 2000 years ago and not discovered until 1947, the Dead Sea Scrolls provide a unique insight into Jewish and Christian origins. They have held a fascination over academics, religious leaders, and the lay public alike for the last forty-five years. From 1952, when a team of scholars was appointed and Cave 4 at Qumran was discovered - from which the mat Placed in caves almost 2000 years ago and not discovered until 1947, the Dead Sea Scrolls provide a unique insight into Jewish and Christian origins. They have held a fascination over academics, religious leaders, and the lay public alike for the last forty-five years. From 1952, when a team of scholars was appointed and Cave 4 at Qumran was discovered - from which the materials in this book are drawn - they have been under the control of an elite and secretive clique. However, in the autumn of 1991, this monopoly was effectively broken when the Huntington Library in California announced it would allow public access to its collection of Dead Sea Scrolls photographs. This was soon followed by the publication of a Facsimile Edition by the Biblical Archaeology Society in Washington D.C. Robert Eisenman was integrally involved in both events, and with Michael Wise had been working behind the scenes on the unpublished photographs for some time. Their discovery of a tiny Scroll fragment of six lines referring to the execution of or by a Messianic Leader plunged them into a long-running debate. Scholars previously controlling access to the Scrolls had been publically contending that there was nothing interesting in the remaining unpublished Scrolls and nothing throwing further light on Christianity's rise in Palestine. The conclusions of Professor Eisenman and Professor Wise gainsay and challenge these views. The present work is the result. For the first time the public will be able to see the most interesting and exciting texts from the unpublished corpus and judge for itself. Providing precise English translations and complete transcriptions into modern Hebrew characters, The Dead Sea Scrolls Uncovered makes generally available in a clear and accessible style fifty of the best texts. Accompanied by incisive and readable commentaries aimed at both lay person and scholar alike, these texts provide exciting and ground-breaking insights into Messianism, an alternative p

30 review for Dead Sea Scrolls Uncovered

  1. 5 out of 5

    David Withun

    -

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ian Chapman

    This was an important work, in that it broke the monopoly of scholarship around the Dead Sea Scrolls. Previously an elitist group led by an aristocratic French Catholic cleric controlled academic access and monopolised interpretation. The almost thuggish jewish style shown by Eisenman in approach, writing and interpretation is not inappropriate after decades of refined elitism, giving a new dimension to history. In religious terms the Qumran community are shown as Sadducee zealots, partly milita This was an important work, in that it broke the monopoly of scholarship around the Dead Sea Scrolls. Previously an elitist group led by an aristocratic French Catholic cleric controlled academic access and monopolised interpretation. The almost thuggish jewish style shown by Eisenman in approach, writing and interpretation is not inappropriate after decades of refined elitism, giving a new dimension to history. In religious terms the Qumran community are shown as Sadducee zealots, partly militarised, rather than austere monkish visionaries. Today scholarship has moved on, but even so this is still a pivotal work.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rick Massey

    Dr. Eisenman was instrumental breaking the monopoly on the majority of the Dead Sea Scrolls that were kept hidden from the rest of us for more than thirty years. This is the fascinating story of how and why he did it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    Interesting history and material. I did not feel the author know how to write the book was more like a boring lecture.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Schramm

    A very slow read. Mostly boring, but every so often a tid bit of interesting information pops out at you to keep you interested.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Céline FrenchAlps

    Some pieces of the scrolls found in the cave 4 of Qumran. Interesting by its contents, and what a mystery for those ancient times !

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Soldate

    I recently looked at this book after 25 years. The authors are incredibly self satisfied and their theories about Christianity are a crock of shit. Their theory is that (1)because of certain linguistic similarities, the authors of certain texts were the early Christians.; (2) that the fact that every Christian text expresses a philosophy totally inconsistent with the texts they read proves that christianity was misrepresented by St Paul. A more obvious reading is that the Quamrun texts were not C I recently looked at this book after 25 years. The authors are incredibly self satisfied and their theories about Christianity are a crock of shit. Their theory is that (1)because of certain linguistic similarities, the authors of certain texts were the early Christians.; (2) that the fact that every Christian text expresses a philosophy totally inconsistent with the texts they read proves that christianity was misrepresented by St Paul. A more obvious reading is that the Quamrun texts were not Christan. Lolling in self congratlation and contemptuous of others, the writers are totally oblivious to their own stupidity.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Deirdre

    This was a very good book for its time, and was instrumental in loosening the stranglehold around the scholarship that was involved with the studies of the scrolls' fragments. Now, several years later, 2018, another cave has been found that holds even more fragments. It seems the mysteries will be studied for generations to come, but can we ever really know the true history of Qumran? Will the archaeologists finally agree on who lived there and why the scrolls were stored there? This was a very good book for its time, and was instrumental in loosening the stranglehold around the scholarship that was involved with the studies of the scrolls' fragments. Now, several years later, 2018, another cave has been found that holds even more fragments. It seems the mysteries will be studied for generations to come, but can we ever really know the true history of Qumran? Will the archaeologists finally agree on who lived there and why the scrolls were stored there?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Robert Anton-Erik

    A critically important work even today. I have to disagree with other reviewers' claims that scholarship has moved on or that this book is now pointless. The commentary and translations in this book highlight the ubiquitous vocabulary used across the sectarian texts of the Dead Sea Scrolls. All other translations that I have read obscure significant commonly used terms. I think it necessary to read and compare several translations to even begin to understand what's going on in the Scrolls. A critically important work even today. I have to disagree with other reviewers' claims that scholarship has moved on or that this book is now pointless. The commentary and translations in this book highlight the ubiquitous vocabulary used across the sectarian texts of the Dead Sea Scrolls. All other translations that I have read obscure significant commonly used terms. I think it necessary to read and compare several translations to even begin to understand what's going on in the Scrolls.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Reinhold

    The authors refer to textes that are in a very bad shape and build their base on guesses. Even that they are most probably right because they talk of knowledge they got from other sciences, they let it seem as if it is based on the scrolls. They show parts of the scrolls, with a few signs recognizable and base on that as if it had been a page that was clearly readable. Maybe try to reread it in the future.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jonnie Enloe

    Outside of a comparative study of some type, read on it's own, it is simply difficult. Nothing wrong with author or subject. Hard to read about bits of papyrus with text fragments, one after the other with history hanging on each one. Outside of a comparative study of some type, read on it's own, it is simply difficult. Nothing wrong with author or subject. Hard to read about bits of papyrus with text fragments, one after the other with history hanging on each one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ippino

    Molto interessante. L'unico difetto è il registro piuttosto "alto" delle introduzioni ai vari Rotoli: è un libro scritto da accademici per accademici. Non troppo divulgativo; c'è poco spazio per le spiegazioni al volgo. Molto interessante. L'unico difetto è il registro piuttosto "alto" delle introduzioni ai vari Rotoli: è un libro scritto da accademici per accademici. Non troppo divulgativo; c'è poco spazio per le spiegazioni al volgo.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Oma Eagle

    I have 1992 edition.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bill Kuykendall

    Robert Eisenman was the person most responsible for forcing the release of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1993 -- after they had been hidden from view for nearly 40 years.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    A complete translation. 50 key documents. Gave to the church library.

  16. 5 out of 5

    garfunkelgrass

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carol

  18. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  19. 4 out of 5

    aldo zirsov

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wolfgang

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mukesh Rawal

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Griggs

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Jones

  26. 4 out of 5

    P.S. Winn

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jefflud Pennington

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matt Campbell

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mark Grago

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

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