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Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible

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This is the only complete and unabridged one-volume edition of Matthew Henry's famous work."First among the mighty (commentaries) for general usefulness we are bound to mention the man whose name is a household word, Matthew Henry. He is the most pious and pithy, sound and sensible, suggestive and sober, terse and trustworthy . . . he is deeply spiritual, heavenly, profita This is the only complete and unabridged one-volume edition of Matthew Henry's famous work."First among the mighty (commentaries) for general usefulness we are bound to mention the man whose name is a household word, Matthew Henry. He is the most pious and pithy, sound and sensible, suggestive and sober, terse and trustworthy . . . he is deeply spiritual, heavenly, profitable; finding good matter in every text, and from all deducting the most practical and judicious lessons . . . It is the Christian's companion, suitable to everybody, instructive to all." " Charles H. Spurgeon From Genesis to Revelation, Matthew Henry successfully combines practical application, devotional insight, and scholarship on the entire Bible. Henry has profound insights on the content, message and nature of God's divine revelation. Perfect for all readers of the Bible who want a convenient, comprehensive commentary.- Includes the entire text of Matthew Henry's original multi-volume commentary- Modern easy-to-read type- Portable- Attractive and affordable


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This is the only complete and unabridged one-volume edition of Matthew Henry's famous work."First among the mighty (commentaries) for general usefulness we are bound to mention the man whose name is a household word, Matthew Henry. He is the most pious and pithy, sound and sensible, suggestive and sober, terse and trustworthy . . . he is deeply spiritual, heavenly, profita This is the only complete and unabridged one-volume edition of Matthew Henry's famous work."First among the mighty (commentaries) for general usefulness we are bound to mention the man whose name is a household word, Matthew Henry. He is the most pious and pithy, sound and sensible, suggestive and sober, terse and trustworthy . . . he is deeply spiritual, heavenly, profitable; finding good matter in every text, and from all deducting the most practical and judicious lessons . . . It is the Christian's companion, suitable to everybody, instructive to all." " Charles H. Spurgeon From Genesis to Revelation, Matthew Henry successfully combines practical application, devotional insight, and scholarship on the entire Bible. Henry has profound insights on the content, message and nature of God's divine revelation. Perfect for all readers of the Bible who want a convenient, comprehensive commentary.- Includes the entire text of Matthew Henry's original multi-volume commentary- Modern easy-to-read type- Portable- Attractive and affordable

30 review for Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Stieffel

    I read through this commentary over about a year and a quarter as I did a chronological reading of the Bible. I used the Olive Tree Bible Study app, which synched my daily readings with the commentary. This was a great way to read through the Bible. Henry's comments illuminate the text and place everything in the Old Testament in context of our understanding of Christ. I appreciated the insight into finding the savior in the OT. Henry's text makes for a great devotional, as it often challenges t I read through this commentary over about a year and a quarter as I did a chronological reading of the Bible. I used the Olive Tree Bible Study app, which synched my daily readings with the commentary. This was a great way to read through the Bible. Henry's comments illuminate the text and place everything in the Old Testament in context of our understanding of Christ. I appreciated the insight into finding the savior in the OT. Henry's text makes for a great devotional, as it often challenges the reader to deepen their faith and Christian walk.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brent McCulley

    What can be said of Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible? Let's let the giants of the protestant faith speak for themselves. Of Henry's Commentary, Charles Haddon Spurgeon said: "Every minister ought to read it entirely and carefully through once at least." George Whitefield, the great Anglican preacher read through Matthew Henry's Commentary at least four times - the last time reading it through on his knees! Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible is rich in exegetical wisdom. Th What can be said of Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible? Let's let the giants of the protestant faith speak for themselves. Of Henry's Commentary, Charles Haddon Spurgeon said: "Every minister ought to read it entirely and carefully through once at least." George Whitefield, the great Anglican preacher read through Matthew Henry's Commentary at least four times - the last time reading it through on his knees! Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible is rich in exegetical wisdom. The commentary spurs the Christian reader to a deeper devotion to our Lord Jesus Christ, with every passage always pointing back to the cross - whether the passage in commenting on the Old or New Testament. I have been blessed beyond belief by the commentary, and am proud to say that I've read it cover to cover - something that every Christian should undertake at least once in their lifetime. Although Matthew Henry wrote an enormous six volumes of commentary, one can purchase the single-volume commentary, or the concise commentary on the whole Bible, which offers Matthew Henry at his best! Brent McCulley (10/5/13)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Qasim Zafar

    This was a dense book to read and is quite verbose. While reading it, however I could not help but notice how often it seemed that Henry seemed to be preaching and not simply expounding on the Bible. Also, there were parts where Henry doesn’t seem to have logical consistency in his own exposition, does not catch logical inconsistencies in the bible, or does not seem to take other parts of the bible into account when expounding, and I would like to use his commentary on the story of Adam & Eve, a This was a dense book to read and is quite verbose. While reading it, however I could not help but notice how often it seemed that Henry seemed to be preaching and not simply expounding on the Bible. Also, there were parts where Henry doesn’t seem to have logical consistency in his own exposition, does not catch logical inconsistencies in the bible, or does not seem to take other parts of the bible into account when expounding, and I would like to use his commentary on the story of Adam & Eve, and of Noah from Genesis, and of verses from Deuteronomy as examples of why I think so. When commenting on Eve being created after Adam, and from his rib, he comments that women owe a certain “subjection and reverence which wives owe to their own husbands.” And literally a few sentences later goes on to state that because she was created from his side and not his head, that she was neither meant to rule above him or be trampled by him, but rather to rule by his side. If the reader asks the question, given A, how does B necessarily follow? Henry seems to be taking the opportunity to push his own ideological view or simply making a point for which there isn’t any evidence for. Next, when commenting on the story of Noah there is a part where the Bible first clearly states that, “Noah was a just man and perfect in his generations,” it goes on to say of everyone else on the earth that, “…all flesh had corrupted his way upon the earth.” Later in the story when it is mentioned in the Bible that Noah was drunk in the tent, Henry goes on to comment on which of his sons were right and which of Noah’s sons were wrong, and the necessity for sobriety but doesn’t see the inherent contradiction in, on the one hand Noah being said to be a perfect man in contrast to everyone being of corrupted flesh, and engaging on the corruption of the flesh and mind by virtue of his drunkardness. Also, if indeed He is an omnipotent God and He knows all that was and will be why would he need to regret anything about his creation? This also isn’t something which Henry takes into account when commenting on the story of the flood the flood where God is said to “regret” having caused the flood. Thirdly, Later in Deuteronomy 18:18 it is said, “I will raise them up a Prophet from among their brethren, like unto thee, and will put my words in his mouth; and he shall speak unto them all that I shall command him.” Henry comments, “Whether a succession of prophets be included in this promise or not, we are sure that it is primarily intended as a promise of Christ.” But this doesn’t make sense. Because inasmuch as God is talking to Moses then we have to consider the verse in light of the Christian doctrine. And in the Christian theology… 1. Jesus is God incarnate, and Moses is not God. 2. Moses had a mother and a father; but Jesus only had a mother (miraculous birth) 3. Jesus was not accepted as a prophet by his people as a whole; but Moses was. **John 1:11 He (Jesus) Came unto his own but they received him not. 4. Moses was a religious, social and political leader, and a king of his people; but Jesus was only a religious leader i.e. his kingdom was only a spiritual one. **Gospel of John 18:36 Jesus says, “My kingdom is not of this world.” 5. Moses was given a new revelation and a new law; but Jesus only came to confirm what was revealed onto Moses. **Gospel of Matthew 5:17-19 Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfill. For verily I say unto you, till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled. 6. Jesus was a chaste bachelor his whole life and did not have children; Moses married and had children. 7. Jesus was crucified; but Moses was not (he died a natural death). 8. Jesus was resurrected after three days and has a heavenly abode, but Moses is buried here on earth. 9. Jesus went to Hell for 3 days, and Moses did not. 10. Jesus died for the sins of the world; but Moses did not. Though Henry use John 7:16-17 (which reads, “My teaching is not my own. It comes from the one who sent me). Anyone who chooses to do the will of God will find out whether my teaching comes from God or whether I speak on my own) to reason that this is proof that God put his words in his (Jesus’s) mouth, one could just as easily reason that this verse could apply to all of God’s prophets in that none of them teach on their own, and only speak what is revealed to them by God. In conclusion, I really did enjoy reading this book and I learned a lot about Christianity, and when taking my review into consideration the reader should also keep in mind that I have not read any other expository works and for that reason cannot say if this is the best work out there. This is not an easy read and I definitely had to use external resources which greatly aid me in my journey and helped with understanding. I have made them available below in addition to links for free download versions of Matthew Henry’s commentaries . ***Resources*** Books: 1. Matthew Henry – Genesis to Deuteronomy: http://www.grace-ebooks.com/library/M... 2. Matthew Henry – Joshua to Esther: http://www.grace-ebooks.com/library/i... 3. Matthew Henry – Job to Song of Solomon: http://www.grace-ebooks.com/library/M... 4. Matthew Henry – Isaiah to Malachi: http://www.grace-ebooks.com/library/i... 5. Matthew Henry – Matthew to John: http://www.grace-ebooks.com/library/M... 6. Matthew Henry – Acts to Revelation: http://www.grace-ebooks.com/library/M... Lectures: 1. Old Testament Studies I: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... 2. Old Testament Studies II: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... 3. Intro to the Old Testament: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... 4. New Testament History and Literature: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    The concise commentary is what I use on a daily basis, and it's in nice bite size chapter portions. Wise man. Love this commentary. The concise commentary is what I use on a daily basis, and it's in nice bite size chapter portions. Wise man. Love this commentary.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Driskill

    This is a wonderful commentary. It is very old but the subject has not changed so it is as accurate today as when it was written. This is a source I go to often to stimulate a deeper consideration of a text. It is very rich and truly plumbs the depths of every passage in a near exhaustive manner. That being said it can be very dense and somewhat overwhelming to some readers. I see it as a means to stimulate thought about a passage rather than a strict interpretation. Henry speculates and expound This is a wonderful commentary. It is very old but the subject has not changed so it is as accurate today as when it was written. This is a source I go to often to stimulate a deeper consideration of a text. It is very rich and truly plumbs the depths of every passage in a near exhaustive manner. That being said it can be very dense and somewhat overwhelming to some readers. I see it as a means to stimulate thought about a passage rather than a strict interpretation. Henry speculates and expounds on a text and gives illustrations to excess at times rather than simply giving the meaning of what is stated in a passage. If you care to drink from the fire plug, this commentary will satisfy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    First sentence: Here before us is the Holy Bible, or book, for this is what the word bible means. We call it the Book, for it is incomparably the best book that has ever been written: it is the book of books. We call it the Holy Book, because it was written by holy prophets, moved by the Holy Spirit. The great things of God’s Law and Gospel are here written for us, that they might be transmitted to distant lands and ages in a purer and more complete way than they could possibly be by word of mou First sentence: Here before us is the Holy Bible, or book, for this is what the word bible means. We call it the Book, for it is incomparably the best book that has ever been written: it is the book of books. We call it the Holy Book, because it was written by holy prophets, moved by the Holy Spirit. The great things of God’s Law and Gospel are here written for us, that they might be transmitted to distant lands and ages in a purer and more complete way than they could possibly be by word of mouth or tradition. I am reading the Bible in 2020 using the daily M'Cheyne (Robert Murray M'Cheyne) plan. I thought it would add a layer of substance to in addition to the four chapters a day, to also read commentaries for those chapters. For that I am using Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible. (Since the plan went through Psalms and the New Testament twice, I did not repeat reading those commentary chapters. Instead I chose to pick up J. Vernon McGee's Thru the Bible commentary to cover this year's second reading Psalms and New Testament.) I would suggest for anyone that is intimidated by bible commentaries--especially one volume commentaries that cover Genesis through Revelation--to come up with a plan. I'd owned this one for several years. In fact, I'd started it several times--never truly making it past the first few books of the Bible. I know I read Genesis at least twice! By having the BIBLE PLAN I was using be my guide for tackling this CHUNKSTER commentary, I always knew just what to read and how much to read. I would read the Scripture chapters for the day and then pick up the commentary. The Scriptures were fresh on my mind. The commentary was easier to follow since I'd literally just read the Scripture. I shared quotes each day as I read on Facebook. There are literally 1,573 highlights saved on my kindle book. (I didn't share *that* many on Facebook). There are way too many highlight to meaningfully go through and make a best of list for this post. Just scanning some of the Genesis quotes, I'm amazed at how timeless this one is. Our duty as Christians is always to keep heaven in our sight and the earth under our feet. What God requires of us he himself works in us, or it is not done. He that commands faith, holiness, and love creates them in us by the power of his grace alongside his word. The One who made the soul is alone able to make it new. He that made us is alone able to make us happy. It adds much to the comfort of any situation if we have clearly seen God going before us and putting us into it. In our best state in this world we still need one another’s help. Our first parents, who knew so much, did not know this—that they knew enough. The way of sin is downhill; we cannot stop ourselves when we want to. Sin brought sorrow into the world; if we had known no guilt, we would have known no grief. We mock God in saying that we are sorry for our sin, and that it grieves us to the heart, if we then continue to indulge in it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michele Michele

    I was doing fine with his commentary until I came upon this: So I'm pulling back a star or two... ""As to the contest about the body of Moses, it appears that Satan wished to make the place of his burial known to the Israelites, in order to tempt them to worship him, but he was prevented, and vented his rage in desperate blasphemy."" And I wondered, how could he make such a assured statement. It sounds like a possibility, but he makes it sound like a fact. What source did he get this from? Is the I was doing fine with his commentary until I came upon this: So I'm pulling back a star or two... ""As to the contest about the body of Moses, it appears that Satan wished to make the place of his burial known to the Israelites, in order to tempt them to worship him, but he was prevented, and vented his rage in desperate blasphemy."" And I wondered, how could he make such a assured statement. It sounds like a possibility, but he makes it sound like a fact. What source did he get this from? Is there something in scripture that supports it? It's a bit bold without revealing where this came from. If anyone can correct me and show me his source, please do !****UPDATE:*****""Copied and pasted: The Assumption of Moses. ( Jewish apocryphal pseudepigraphical) We have to take their word for it because only small fragments of these pseudepigraphal writings ""And Samuel tried to bring his corpse down to the people so that they might make him a god, but Michael the archcaptain by the order of God came to take it and remove it, and Samuel resisted him, and they made war. The archcaptain therefore became angry and rebuked him, saying: The Lord rebuke you, devil. And thus the adversary was defeated and fled, and the archangel Michael removed the corpse of Moses to where he was ordered by Christ our God, [and no one saw the burial of Moses]."" Okay, if this source is consistent, and it is quoted in Jude, I stand corrected and add another star.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Russell Folk

    Read in conjunction with my Thematic (2019) reading plan. Feels good! A few problems with this book; mainly that of the depravity of man line of thinking which is especially prevalent in the commentary on Job (expectantly) but pulled out some interesting thoughts for me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ataylor

    I have not actually read this entire book, but it serves as a great reference when studying the bible. It brings so many additional ways to interpret and understand verses you may have read many, many times.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bill Robson

    This works dives deeper into God word. It explains things to use. Good to study scripture with this set of books. I may never read them all, but I'm enriched when I do. Easy to understand. This works dives deeper into God word. It explains things to use. Good to study scripture with this set of books. I may never read them all, but I'm enriched when I do. Easy to understand.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Vaughan

    Sometime Dr. Henry’s Commentary can get a little wordy amp m my opinion but I can always expect to find gold nuggets in the process of digging.

  12. 4 out of 5

    JANET STORR

    Very good book

  13. 5 out of 5

    Martyn

    Didn’t even get past Abram. Just not how to exegete scripture.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Drayton

    Absolutely mind blowing. It brings one to their needs Everyone who believes they are Christian must read this Hopefully if non Christians read it and they realise God and only God is in control

  15. 5 out of 5

    P

    sheds some light to my understanding of the Word, of God and of the history of God's relation with his creation; also the humility of the author and his fear, respect and fervor for God present everywhere in the commentary are deeply moving; but less helpful as a commentary as I feel that its interpretation was limited by the scientific knowledge of his age--not that the Bible requires scientific knowledge to be understood, or that it should be interpreted or even thwarted in order to be coheren sheds some light to my understanding of the Word, of God and of the history of God's relation with his creation; also the humility of the author and his fear, respect and fervor for God present everywhere in the commentary are deeply moving; but less helpful as a commentary as I feel that its interpretation was limited by the scientific knowledge of his age--not that the Bible requires scientific knowledge to be understood, or that it should be interpreted or even thwarted in order to be coherent with scientific discoveries, but that many comparisons he made are inappropriate due to some of the wrong ideas he held regarding to natural science (for example "Like the first-born, it [refers to light] does, of all visible beings, most resemble its great Parent" suggests that the first baby resembles the parents more than his/her younger siblings, a false belief at the time, and makes this whole point of the author's invalid and unneeded). Logical errancy also exists (e.g. the incongruency between "The use and design of it - to divide the waters from the waters, that is, to distinguish between the waters that are wrapped up in the clouds and those that cover the sea, the waters in the air and those in the earth." and "Let there be a firmament, an expansion.... This includes all that is visible above the earth, between it and the third heavens: the air, its higher, middle, and lower, regions - the celestial globe, and all the spheres and orbs of light above: it reaches as high as the place where the stars are fixed, for that is called here the firmament of heaven (Gen 1:14, Gen 1:15), and as low as the place where the birds fly, for that also is called the firmament of heaven, Gen 1:20.") Instances like this impede me from appreciating this commentary to its full worth. So you see, I'm but starting with Genesis and I already felt uncomfortable... Nevertheless, just from a Christian perspective it is worth reading and leads you to God.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Maddox

    I'm relegating this volume to the Ain't Nobody Got Time for That shelf. My intention was to read this commentary as I read through the Bible. However, I'm finding Henry difficult to stomach. No, it was not the verbose nature of the old English used that turned me off; it was the racist and misogynistic nature of the text. From his exposition on Noah's cursing of Ham (and thus, Henry's erroneous assumption that all people of color were cursed, inferior, and doomed to servitude), to blaming Jacob' I'm relegating this volume to the Ain't Nobody Got Time for That shelf. My intention was to read this commentary as I read through the Bible. However, I'm finding Henry difficult to stomach. No, it was not the verbose nature of the old English used that turned me off; it was the racist and misogynistic nature of the text. From his exposition on Noah's cursing of Ham (and thus, Henry's erroneous assumption that all people of color were cursed, inferior, and doomed to servitude), to blaming Jacob's daughter, Dinah, for her own rape (yes, a 17th century account of rape shaming), the author did not expound on the scriptures as a means of devotion to God, but rather his own twisted doctrine. I felt more dread with the book than excitement in deep diving into Scripture study. I will continue my Bible reading and study, but I will not accompany it with this commentary. Since the author occasionally makes good points and the commentary is highly recommended, I'll keep the book in my library as a reference. However, I'm not going to continue to allow it to ruin my Bible Study.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    I have used this standard Bible Commentary for many years, but only in the abridged editions available. Many Christian friends have informed me that these often miss out many important points that Matthew Henry makes to illuminate the Word of God and apply it to our hearts and life situations. So I have decided to take the plunge and managed to obtain the unabridged one volume version for $29.97 which I consider to be a great bargain for the golden nuggets it contains. If you are not very good w I have used this standard Bible Commentary for many years, but only in the abridged editions available. Many Christian friends have informed me that these often miss out many important points that Matthew Henry makes to illuminate the Word of God and apply it to our hearts and life situations. So I have decided to take the plunge and managed to obtain the unabridged one volume version for $29.97 which I consider to be a great bargain for the golden nuggets it contains. If you are not very good with small print my recommendation is that you invest in a magnifying glass or look for a freely obtainable online edition to use. I may have other point to add to my review once I have had more opportunity to enjoy part of this spiritual banquet!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Rose

    Matthew Henry certainly has a gift for turning phrases, and he does a good job of giving a practical application for the passages that he is working on (his preaching side comes through in many expanded notes!). This commentary, often available in a concise version online, is a heavy go for first-time researchers. Keep in mind that he was studying and writing in the early 1700s, and people thought, spoke and wrote differently in that time. Wisdom abounds, for those with the patience to pick thro Matthew Henry certainly has a gift for turning phrases, and he does a good job of giving a practical application for the passages that he is working on (his preaching side comes through in many expanded notes!). This commentary, often available in a concise version online, is a heavy go for first-time researchers. Keep in mind that he was studying and writing in the early 1700s, and people thought, spoke and wrote differently in that time. Wisdom abounds, for those with the patience to pick through old-fashioned and rather lacy words.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mitch

    Fantastic reference to aid in the understanding of proper exegetical study, context, purpose, intent, and meaning of every passage in the Bible. A timeless work that will help you further appreciate the Holy Bible and will bring you to a deeper understanding for application of scripture in your daily life (and every time you encounter scripture). Matthew Henry was a master of study and his works have continued even today to appreciate the most important guide we have, the Holy Bible! Grace to you, Fantastic reference to aid in the understanding of proper exegetical study, context, purpose, intent, and meaning of every passage in the Bible. A timeless work that will help you further appreciate the Holy Bible and will bring you to a deeper understanding for application of scripture in your daily life (and every time you encounter scripture). Matthew Henry was a master of study and his works have continued even today to appreciate the most important guide we have, the Holy Bible! Grace to you, Glory to God!

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Gyles

    The method of teaching called Continuous Historical View Of Biblical Prophecy is applied somewhat in his commentary. Most found in prophecy in Daniel and Revelations. Early on in my quest to increase my understanding I purchased the Matthew Henry Commentary Set. For those who have not known of this teaching please considered that there are three main teach all along the Christian area. 1. Preterists 2. Futurists. 3. Historical

  21. 4 out of 5

    Isaac

    VERY HARD to navigate! Its possible I don't know what I'm doing so please if there is a better way let me know. When wanting to go to a specific chapter and verse I can use the table of contents or the location (the TofC is used by scrolling through about five verses at a time which begins at Genesis and the location search is 30,000 pages!) Why can't I search for a book, chapter, and/or verse? VERY HARD to navigate! Its possible I don't know what I'm doing so please if there is a better way let me know. When wanting to go to a specific chapter and verse I can use the table of contents or the location (the TofC is used by scrolling through about five verses at a time which begins at Genesis and the location search is 30,000 pages!) Why can't I search for a book, chapter, and/or verse?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Trice

    Back in 2001 I was introduced to this during a group Bible study on Romans - truly revealing thoughts. I've now gone back to it for reference during some difficult reading in Leviticus and found it once again thoroughly helpful. Using it online right now (http://www.ccel.org/ccel/henry/mhc1.i...), but seriously contemplating purchasing this version. Back in 2001 I was introduced to this during a group Bible study on Romans - truly revealing thoughts. I've now gone back to it for reference during some difficult reading in Leviticus and found it once again thoroughly helpful. Using it online right now (http://www.ccel.org/ccel/henry/mhc1.i...), but seriously contemplating purchasing this version.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    I love this! My family has owned the six volume set, originally my great-grandfather's, for years, but I never really got into it until I bought the study Bible a few years ago. I love his classic wisdom! I can also recommend the smartphone/tablet app. It's well worth the couple dollars, is searchable, and is complete. I love this! My family has owned the six volume set, originally my great-grandfather's, for years, but I never really got into it until I bought the study Bible a few years ago. I love his classic wisdom! I can also recommend the smartphone/tablet app. It's well worth the couple dollars, is searchable, and is complete.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bobey Clifton

    This is the worst This is not the whole bible with a whole commentary as you are lead to believe in the write up about it. It is just a whole commentary on the whole bible. I am very upset I wasted me money on this and money is too hard to come by. Now I don't know if I kin delete it from me Kindle Fire and I don't know if I will be able to get a refund or not. This is the worst This is not the whole bible with a whole commentary as you are lead to believe in the write up about it. It is just a whole commentary on the whole bible. I am very upset I wasted me money on this and money is too hard to come by. Now I don't know if I kin delete it from me Kindle Fire and I don't know if I will be able to get a refund or not.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bob Ladwig

    One of the must have commentaries for any serious Bible student. Henry's depth and precision are remarkable as well as his ability to apply the word to the reader. If your library is to have but one bible commentary this is the one to have. One of the must have commentaries for any serious Bible student. Henry's depth and precision are remarkable as well as his ability to apply the word to the reader. If your library is to have but one bible commentary this is the one to have.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Annette Godwin

    I'm emjoying using it as a guide to study. I bought it for help with Proverbs, but was excited to find all Henry's work in one handy volume for my Nook. It is easy to scoot back and forth between this and my NIV. A I'm emjoying using it as a guide to study. I bought it for help with Proverbs, but was excited to find all Henry's work in one handy volume for my Nook. It is easy to scoot back and forth between this and my NIV. A

  27. 5 out of 5

    D. L.

    This is a wonderful study addition for the Pastor/Teacher. I refer to Henry's commentary whenever I want to expound on the Word of God. The commentary brings to life the Logos, Pathos, and ethos of the scriptures. This is a wonderful study addition for the Pastor/Teacher. I refer to Henry's commentary whenever I want to expound on the Word of God. The commentary brings to life the Logos, Pathos, and ethos of the scriptures.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Saundra Carr

    Great hard to get out of index Incredible...hard to get out of index to commentary...bcc very in-depth have to read it several times but very different ideas than regular commentary

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    i like to read it along with the Bible sometimes and it is great to look things up in. this guy had a great perspective and insight into spiritual things. its old fashioned, but still very relevant.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kathi Jensen

    One of the best commentaries I own. This commentary covers every verse in the bible and is solid in doctrine and theology. Although there has been many advances in historical and biblical culture knowledge since Matthew Henry, it is still a must have in every Christian's library. One of the best commentaries I own. This commentary covers every verse in the bible and is solid in doctrine and theology. Although there has been many advances in historical and biblical culture knowledge since Matthew Henry, it is still a must have in every Christian's library.

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