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Keep Your Brain Alive: 83 Neurobic Exercises to Help Prevent Memory Loss and Increase Mental Fitness

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OVER 40? GETTING FORGETFUL? TROUBLE LEARNING NEW TRICKS? Introducing Neurobics, a unique brain exercise program based on the latest neuroscience research. These deceptively simple exercises help stimulate the production of nutrients that grow brain cells to keep the brain younger and stronger. Neurobics uses the five senses in unexpected ways and shakes up everyday routine OVER 40? GETTING FORGETFUL? TROUBLE LEARNING NEW TRICKS? Introducing Neurobics, a unique brain exercise program based on the latest neuroscience research. These deceptively simple exercises help stimulate the production of nutrients that grow brain cells to keep the brain younger and stronger. Neurobics uses the five senses in unexpected ways and shakes up everyday routines. The exercises are offbeat, fun, and can be done anywhere, anytime. The result: a mind fit to meet any challenge-whether it's remembering a name, mastering a new computer program, or staying creative in your work.


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OVER 40? GETTING FORGETFUL? TROUBLE LEARNING NEW TRICKS? Introducing Neurobics, a unique brain exercise program based on the latest neuroscience research. These deceptively simple exercises help stimulate the production of nutrients that grow brain cells to keep the brain younger and stronger. Neurobics uses the five senses in unexpected ways and shakes up everyday routine OVER 40? GETTING FORGETFUL? TROUBLE LEARNING NEW TRICKS? Introducing Neurobics, a unique brain exercise program based on the latest neuroscience research. These deceptively simple exercises help stimulate the production of nutrients that grow brain cells to keep the brain younger and stronger. Neurobics uses the five senses in unexpected ways and shakes up everyday routines. The exercises are offbeat, fun, and can be done anywhere, anytime. The result: a mind fit to meet any challenge-whether it's remembering a name, mastering a new computer program, or staying creative in your work.

30 review for Keep Your Brain Alive: 83 Neurobic Exercises to Help Prevent Memory Loss and Increase Mental Fitness

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    “Neurobics requires you to do two simple things you may have neglected in your lifestyle: Experience the unexpected and enlist the aid of all your senses in the course of the day.” p. 31 I like the idea of this book, but the ideas themselves are hit or miss. All are very doable and some we all do already, but others are just not something most of us would actually do without feeling and maybe even looking a bit strange. That said, mixing it up and trying new things is good for your brain so go ah “Neurobics requires you to do two simple things you may have neglected in your lifestyle: Experience the unexpected and enlist the aid of all your senses in the course of the day.” p. 31 I like the idea of this book, but the ideas themselves are hit or miss. All are very doable and some we all do already, but others are just not something most of us would actually do without feeling and maybe even looking a bit strange. That said, mixing it up and trying new things is good for your brain so go ahead and take a different route to work, switch seats at the dinner table, or try your hand at kite-flying as a new leisure activity. We can all find novel ways to activate our senses and engage our brain in new ways thus maintaining and improving our mental ability. This would make a good 5 minute or less TED talk.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣

    Some nice ideas: basically mix it up, do things like you don't do them usually, use associations, maintain neuroplasticity, practice synesthesia (loved this one!) -1 star 'cause it's all very merry-go-round ideas that are sorta widely known (other than self-induced synesthesia, must think about that one!) Some nice ideas: basically mix it up, do things like you don't do them usually, use associations, maintain neuroplasticity, practice synesthesia (loved this one!) -1 star 'cause it's all very merry-go-round ideas that are sorta widely known (other than self-induced synesthesia, must think about that one!)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sydney

    Really, I'd give it about 3.5 stars. Lots of practical things you can do to prevent/improve memory issues. And some nice, simple explanations in the beginning of the book re how your brain works (especially regarding memory and associations) and how the exercises in the book relate. There is also a bibliography so you can check out all the research it's based on. This book came out in 1999, but still plenty of useful info. Really, I'd give it about 3.5 stars. Lots of practical things you can do to prevent/improve memory issues. And some nice, simple explanations in the beginning of the book re how your brain works (especially regarding memory and associations) and how the exercises in the book relate. There is also a bibliography so you can check out all the research it's based on. This book came out in 1999, but still plenty of useful info.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Yamen Mardini

    A book full of ridiculous and meaningless exercises that are supposed to keep our brain alive. The main concept of the book is that routines kill the novelty factor in the brain and this would lead our mind to stay in the autopilot mode which offers no development for the mind, so here's an 80+ stupid activities you can do to trigger your senses, and waste your time, which can be summarized as: smell everything, taste everything, start doing routine stuff using your left hand and with eyes close A book full of ridiculous and meaningless exercises that are supposed to keep our brain alive. The main concept of the book is that routines kill the novelty factor in the brain and this would lead our mind to stay in the autopilot mode which offers no development for the mind, so here's an 80+ stupid activities you can do to trigger your senses, and waste your time, which can be summarized as: smell everything, taste everything, start doing routine stuff using your left hand and with eyes closed if possible. This book is overly simplified and doesn't contain much valuable informations about the mind, but hey it's full of fun pictures so it could be a good read for the kids. :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura Westmeyer

    I picked this up after viewing the Bodyworlds exhibit in Chicago. I loved the concrete ideas this book provides to switch up your routine, though some were impractical. (for example, driving with your eyes closed) It's an interesting book but not the type you need to buy and read because the two sole takeaways could just be summarized as: (1) Shake up your routine; and (2) Use senses you normally wouldn't for a given task. I picked this up after viewing the Bodyworlds exhibit in Chicago. I loved the concrete ideas this book provides to switch up your routine, though some were impractical. (for example, driving with your eyes closed) It's an interesting book but not the type you need to buy and read because the two sole takeaways could just be summarized as: (1) Shake up your routine; and (2) Use senses you normally wouldn't for a given task.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Oleksandr Golovatyi

    nice book about mental fitness, it has a lot of fun and interesting brain exercisers

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Carter

    Progress Updates: December 4, 2020 – 12.0% "Although this was aimed for ADULTS who want to enhance their retention and cognitive sentience (that's what I call it, at least), I chose to read it anyways, even though I'm not even close to being an adult! It's actually a very compelling novel that seems to promote the growth of new dendrites, activity associated with the cerebral cortex by appeasing a variety of senses instead of being associated with routine!" December 24, 2020 – 23.0% "I finally ha Progress Updates: December 4, 2020 – 12.0% "Although this was aimed for ADULTS who want to enhance their retention and cognitive sentience (that's what I call it, at least), I chose to read it anyways, even though I'm not even close to being an adult! It's actually a very compelling novel that seems to promote the growth of new dendrites, activity associated with the cerebral cortex by appeasing a variety of senses instead of being associated with routine!" December 24, 2020 – 23.0% "I finally had time to read this! That's what I get for concurrently working on my 50 classics goal and reading about the brain Anyways, the articulate explanations on why cyclical routines and quotidian activities are detrimental to the growth of dendrites, the processing of things through the cerebral cortex, and the organization of memories through the hippocampus are pretty cool! Can't wait to start the exercises!" January 7, 2021 – 40.0% "The neurobic exercises are interesting, but I do notice that it genuinely IS trying to target people of an older age. It feels so strange to addressed as if I was an adult who doesn't know what it's like to undergo unprecedented changes. However, I don't put too much fault on the author, and I don;'t mean to offend anyone." January 26, 2021 – 80.0% "The book is leaving me to feel slightly more exasperated. The premise is rational and cogent, but it's getting repetitive and vapid. Also, it really is evident that this book was ACTUALLY AIMED FOR A SPECIFIC AGE GROUP, and ONLY that specific age group! ("Have a Sexy Dinner?" I had to skip that one!)" NOTE: I review self-help/guidebooks very differently from books that actually have plots. Beware... I INITIALLY became interested in the book by the premise, but the book, as mentioned in the last 2 Updates, became repetitive, vapid, and actually began to emphasize the fact that this was really meant for ADULTS, and I'm not an ADULT! (I'm still surprised to find out that I didn't regurgitate my meal after reading the "Have a Sexy Dinner Section." From 50-80%, only one stimulus had driven me to finish the book in the first place: Get it over with and write a review to update my "Goodreads" profile. Yes, this is a vague review, so here is the elaboration and reasoning behind my sentiments: 1. Neurobic or rational? I genuinely thought that the term neurobic, whether you chose to look at it through the intricate semantics or lexical simplicity that gives you seemingly superficial knowledge, would actually be synonymous to the term rational in some ways. Is it??? NOPE!!! Neurobic is a term that is related to the field of neurobics with an "s," which is a field of exercises meant to enhance retention and the accommodation of knowledge (memory) by breaking barriers of cyclical normalcies. That sounds really interesting, doesn't it? OH YEAH??!! NEUROBICS, APPARENTLY, DON'T ACTUALLY FULFILL STANDARDS ASSOCIATED WITH ADEQUATE AMOUNTS OF CIRCUMSPECTION TO ALLOW US TO ACT RATIONALLY! For example, an exercise required someone to do what? Try to start their car with THEIR EYES CLOSED?? I know, I know. This enhances your spatial and textile retention as you feel for your keys and buttons, but you might accidentally slam your foot on that pedal that allows your car to be mobile, and you'll find yourself calling the "Geico" car insurance company. Why? You inadvertently made your car mobile and, out of surprise, forgot to maneuver it away from that large palm tree on your neighbor's lawn! VAGUE EXPLANATIONS! The premise wasn't written to be convoluted, so that would cross out the terms "confuse," "obscure," "distort," "perplex," "complicate," and "mystify." There are people who are strongly FAMILIAR w/ neurobics and try to promote it, so "misunderstand," "conceal", and "hide" wouldn't work. Leaves us with one term---"misrepresent." This misrepresentation was due to the lack of LUCID CLARIFICATIONS and PSYCHOLOGICAL EXPLANATION OF EVIDENCE. (A lot of claims, some evidence, hardly any explanations.) "This exercise requires you to use the opposite side of your brain instead of the side you normally use. Consequently, all those circuits, connections, and brain areas involved in using your dominant hand are inactive, while their counterparts on the other side of your brain are suddenly required to direct a set of behaviors in which they usually don't participate. Research has shown that this type of exercise can result in a rapid and substantial expansion of circuits in the parts of the cortex that control and process tactile information from the hand." A decent explanation that elucidates the reasons for WHY an alternate-your-hand exercise terminates normalcy and how DIVERSE circuits in the brain are STIMULATED can expand your textile information and thus make it neurobic. However, the raw explanation itself is merely just a rudimentary outline of what happens when you use an alternate hand. Research does show that it increases your tactile retention, but, using the raw phrase "research shows such-and-such" only draws a CLAIM, but there's no logic to corroborate the VERACITY of the research. It's like using this raw trivia fact: Michael Jordan earns more money from Nike annually than all the company's Malaysian workers combined. What about that fact? Why would it be factually inerrant? Where was his pecuniary prominence derived? Was Jordan involved in any affiliations with the company? If there was an affiliation, can anyone tell me about its derivation? Was it derived from commercial transactions? Was there a reciprocal transaction in which Jordan bought shoes from Nike and promoted the thriving of the business through advertisement as a prestigious basketball player, and, in return, was given compensation for his work? Questions... Each one demands reasoning, not just presentation. The raw phrase and the raw trivia fact both lack reasoning... Yeah, I think you get the picture. Anyways, this kind of caused me to find the book to be repetitive and vapid. ONLY ONE GROUP OF PEOPLE: I just HAVE to reiterate... This wasn't intended to be aimed at me... and that's okay. The advertisements did say that it was not aimed for children. (I'm not trying to promote ageism; Adults typically have more sagacity than a kid, which is a downside to being a kid/an upside for being an adult). The material (especially "Have a Sexy Dinner") made me extremely uncomfortable, even though I only read the titles of stuff like that. This was actually my fault; All the advertisements said that it was intended for adults, and I should've followed them. Yes, I am, in many ways, extremely immature!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dione Sage

    This book is pretty neat. I am always interested in ways to help prevent memory loss or increase mental fitness. When I was young one of my elementary teachers use to tell us that most humans use a small fraction of their brain and that even the smartest person on earth didn't completely use his entire brain to it's maximum potential. The only reason I recall that story is because I think since hearing that when I was a child, I have always wanted to make sure that my mind didn't go unused. This This book is pretty neat. I am always interested in ways to help prevent memory loss or increase mental fitness. When I was young one of my elementary teachers use to tell us that most humans use a small fraction of their brain and that even the smartest person on earth didn't completely use his entire brain to it's maximum potential. The only reason I recall that story is because I think since hearing that when I was a child, I have always wanted to make sure that my mind didn't go unused. This book has some pretty good advise in ways to gt yourself to test your mental strengths. For example, I would never really think that using your non-dominant hand to brush your teeth would be a big deal but in reality once I thought about it I guess it would make sense that it would trigger some type of effect on your brain and the connections from your actions to the brain. I am not saying that this book is life changing or profound but it is neat and interesting and like doing some of the exercises in it to challenge myself.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Interesting exercises aimed (primarily) at 40+ people who feel as if their losing their 'edge' mentally. As someone perpetually worried about Alzheimer's and dementia (after witnessing it first hand growing up with my great grandma) and with my 13+ concussions, I am always looking out for things like this - books to help cognitively, (as well as looking out for my own symptoms of failing mental issues); I sadly found this book lacking a fair bit. It's basically aimed at your senses (taste, touch Interesting exercises aimed (primarily) at 40+ people who feel as if their losing their 'edge' mentally. As someone perpetually worried about Alzheimer's and dementia (after witnessing it first hand growing up with my great grandma) and with my 13+ concussions, I am always looking out for things like this - books to help cognitively, (as well as looking out for my own symptoms of failing mental issues); I sadly found this book lacking a fair bit. It's basically aimed at your senses (taste, touch, smell, hearing, etc.) and making you do things differently to 'rewire' or at least make your brain 'work harder' at simple tasks. Ie. brushing your teeth with your non-dominant hand. Eating with your eyes closed, etc. Not quite sure how 100% effective these are, and looking to try some of these, but some are rather impractical for most people, and a lot of this is aimed at the middle-aged white male. But I think it's definitely a good start to get people to think about their own mental health and to start warding off failures in cognitive ability.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Am Y

    Too generic to be helpful. I was expecting a book of puzzles or something similar. Instead, this book gives general pieces of advice such as: while you're driving, try to do something else, etc. And yes, you read that correct. While you're driving. (The authors obviously are clueless about the number of accidents caused by distracted drivers.) Examples of some other advice given: observe stuff you normally would not while taking walks, doing chores, etc. D-U-H. I was more interested in reading the Too generic to be helpful. I was expecting a book of puzzles or something similar. Instead, this book gives general pieces of advice such as: while you're driving, try to do something else, etc. And yes, you read that correct. While you're driving. (The authors obviously are clueless about the number of accidents caused by distracted drivers.) Examples of some other advice given: observe stuff you normally would not while taking walks, doing chores, etc. D-U-H. I was more interested in reading the very back of the book where the authors list various studies on cognition and their findings. Wish those studies had been expanded upon instead.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karen & Gerard

    This is a quick-read but very interesting and practical. The gist of the book is to improve memory, you need to keep your active and use all of your senses. “Routines can be brain deadening.” Basically, learn to enjoy new experiences, change things around, interact with people and change up routines. The most startling thing I learned from reading this book is: "Research has shown that watching television literally numbs the mind: The brain is less active during TV-viewing than during sleep!" (p This is a quick-read but very interesting and practical. The gist of the book is to improve memory, you need to keep your active and use all of your senses. “Routines can be brain deadening.” Basically, learn to enjoy new experiences, change things around, interact with people and change up routines. The most startling thing I learned from reading this book is: "Research has shown that watching television literally numbs the mind: The brain is less active during TV-viewing than during sleep!" (p. 117)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    I LOVED this book! So many good ideas to keep your brain mentally strong! The premise of the book is that brains needs variety. Break the routines! Good ideas are given such as change your routine driving routes, shop at different stores, get dressed with your eyes closed, and rearrange your desk often. It's kind of funny - I change things all of the time, rearrange my clasroom, change routine, eat different foods, change my evening routine, etc. I guess I am already very neuronic!!! I LOVED this book! So many good ideas to keep your brain mentally strong! The premise of the book is that brains needs variety. Break the routines! Good ideas are given such as change your routine driving routes, shop at different stores, get dressed with your eyes closed, and rearrange your desk often. It's kind of funny - I change things all of the time, rearrange my clasroom, change routine, eat different foods, change my evening routine, etc. I guess I am already very neuronic!!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    A short book, a quick read. Not a new book, I bought this for my Mom about 10 years ago and just recently found it while sorting through some stuff. The basic premise of this book is to do things differently in order to force the brain to make new connections, "neurobics". We are more apt to tag information for long term memory if it has social significance. So social interactions are key. I also learned that by listening to audio books I am using more of my brain than just looking at words! A short book, a quick read. Not a new book, I bought this for my Mom about 10 years ago and just recently found it while sorting through some stuff. The basic premise of this book is to do things differently in order to force the brain to make new connections, "neurobics". We are more apt to tag information for long term memory if it has social significance. So social interactions are key. I also learned that by listening to audio books I am using more of my brain than just looking at words!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Arjaye Nitro

    The bottomline: change. Dont succumb into routines, instead divert, amend, interact, improv. In that way, the brains has more work to do, more practice, more exercises. Neurobics for a healthier brain and a healthier you.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    The author proposes a series of exercises that you can perform on a daily basis to improve brain function. I am not sure I believe these can really exercise your brain but I am willing to try to brush my teeth with my left hand and a few other tricks to see if I feel any smarter.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Johnson

    This is a great book on keeping your mind alive. There are tons of exercises to challenge the way you think. Some simple, some difficult...but all engaging.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Basically "try something new and break the routine". Not very novel suggestions (Cook something from scratch, go to a Farmer's Market, eat with your non-dominant hand) Basically "try something new and break the routine". Not very novel suggestions (Cook something from scratch, go to a Farmer's Market, eat with your non-dominant hand)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Camellia

    Not mind-blowing, but provides good pointers on keeping sharp.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rishabh Jain

    This is a book preaching the methodology of neurobics. It is presented as a novel way to help you improve brain functionality. Some evidence is provided to support the claim. And then there's the exercises. Too many exercises, not enough concrete evidence related to them. Instead of showing so many exercises, and presenting no information about how someone behaves while performing them, it should have provided some more evidence of the impact of their neurobic exercises on people. The exercises are This is a book preaching the methodology of neurobics. It is presented as a novel way to help you improve brain functionality. Some evidence is provided to support the claim. And then there's the exercises. Too many exercises, not enough concrete evidence related to them. Instead of showing so many exercises, and presenting no information about how someone behaves while performing them, it should have provided some more evidence of the impact of their neurobic exercises on people. The exercises are fine, and some of them are really novel and exciting as well. But the repetitive nature makes them seem cumbersome. Also, a lack of the emotional way of adding to neurobics personally made me feel a bit bummed. I was really looking forward to how the authors suggest neurobics can be accomplished via emotional connections and building off previous information. There's a bit of these things sprinkled within the 83 exercises. But it's not enough for me. Overall, I'd say this is a decent book, with some good exercises that can be tried out. But by no means is this a revolutionary book, or one which has to be adhered to for guaranteed results. One specific thing I'd like to say is : the target audience of this book was people over 40 or so ages. But i think everyone can benefit from neurobics. Maybe the absence of a generalized approach made this book seem a bit dull for me.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    The brain science part of this book was very interesting - but the majority of the book - the brain exercises, are somewhat dated and narrowly focused. Obviously aimed at people in middle-age when the book was published, 2009, the assumed lifestyle does not apply as well now in 2020. In addition, the two male authors assume all readers are like them - so the brain exercises assume readers are heterosexual cis white male homeowners, married with children, with professional jobs that require a com The brain science part of this book was very interesting - but the majority of the book - the brain exercises, are somewhat dated and narrowly focused. Obviously aimed at people in middle-age when the book was published, 2009, the assumed lifestyle does not apply as well now in 2020. In addition, the two male authors assume all readers are like them - so the brain exercises assume readers are heterosexual cis white male homeowners, married with children, with professional jobs that require a commute by car and sitting at a computer most of the day. They also assume a certain amount of free time and affluence. The gist of the book is that labor-saving devices and habits make the connections in the brain atrophy - if your life is too easy and repetitive, then at a certain point in life, you will start to loose brain function. It does beg the question, was any of this brain research done on women or minorities, and did anyone ask the question, do older women maintain healthy brains longer after retirement than men? If so, why is that? That is the book I would love to read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Katie Reader Bear

    This book is very informative and goes into great detail about the function and structure of the brain. The takeaway of the book is that the human mind thrives on novelty so switch things up. The authors offers suggestions on how to do this; however, I don't think this book is as helpful as other brain training books which use puzzles and games, simply because it is far easier to encourage an ageing relative to do a puzzle than it is to persuade them to change their routine or use their non domi This book is very informative and goes into great detail about the function and structure of the brain. The takeaway of the book is that the human mind thrives on novelty so switch things up. The authors offers suggestions on how to do this; however, I don't think this book is as helpful as other brain training books which use puzzles and games, simply because it is far easier to encourage an ageing relative to do a puzzle than it is to persuade them to change their routine or use their non dominant hand. If you are looking for a concise well written book on memory, this is a great book. If you are looking for easy practical ways to improve memory, I would recommend one of the many puzzle books aimed at adults.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy Kidd

    This is a little book aimed at people that feel like their brain needs more stimulation in every day life through what is dubbed ‘Neurobics’ (exercises to keep your brain healthy). The science behind the concept is explained well however some of the exercises are ridiculous. The majority of tasks involve doing things with the non-dominant hand or with your eyes closed so the reading becomes repetitive. Some of the exercises do seem worthwhile (or silly enough to try for a laugh) and, while they t This is a little book aimed at people that feel like their brain needs more stimulation in every day life through what is dubbed ‘Neurobics’ (exercises to keep your brain healthy). The science behind the concept is explained well however some of the exercises are ridiculous. The majority of tasks involve doing things with the non-dominant hand or with your eyes closed so the reading becomes repetitive. Some of the exercises do seem worthwhile (or silly enough to try for a laugh) and, while they try to relate everything back to the science, I am unsure how useful these exercises are in prolonging brain health.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lasse Olsen

    I think I can sum this book up in: - do stuff with your non-dominant hand - do stuff with your eyes closed - do stuff you usually don’t do - smell and touch stuff That’s not to take away for many good points. More that training the brain doesn’t have to be that complicated or time consuming. I tried having my watch on the right wrist instead of left. Absolutely hated it, but concluded that there’s other things I can do.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    It was okay. This is a 1999 book, and I'm not sure why I read it. The exercises are simple, almost too simple in some instances. Others made more sense, such as learning sign language. The bottom line is to do or experience something different to keep the brain healthy. Watching television is a brain numbing exercise, as are daily routines. Very easy and quick read, takes about 20 minutes. It was okay. This is a 1999 book, and I'm not sure why I read it. The exercises are simple, almost too simple in some instances. Others made more sense, such as learning sign language. The bottom line is to do or experience something different to keep the brain healthy. Watching television is a brain numbing exercise, as are daily routines. Very easy and quick read, takes about 20 minutes.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Hedges- Rankin

    Along with a thorough explanation of anatomy and physiology of the brain, there are a lot of interesting exercises / concepts to promote memory function utilizing unused nerve pathways of the brain. With simple explanations on how it helps memory, it’s worth giving it a try especially if you or a family member are experiencing memory problems.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Larissa Fauber

    You may now forget the idea that the older you grow the less brain cells you have. “Keep Your Brain Alive” shows how studies regarding our brain are full of misconceptions. It starts by explaining what really occurs in our brains and what we have to do in order to maintain it working well. Firstly, the authors assert that new brain cells are generated in adults (according to a 1998 study from American and Sweden scientists). In addition, contrary to popular belief, mental decline is not due to th You may now forget the idea that the older you grow the less brain cells you have. “Keep Your Brain Alive” shows how studies regarding our brain are full of misconceptions. It starts by explaining what really occurs in our brains and what we have to do in order to maintain it working well. Firstly, the authors assert that new brain cells are generated in adults (according to a 1998 study from American and Sweden scientists). In addition, contrary to popular belief, mental decline is not due to the death of nerve cells. The real reason is that the dendrites (the branches on nerve cells that receive information from other cells) are decreased as time goes by. However, it was proved that old neurons can develop dendrites to make up for this loss. Having said that, what do we have to do to keep our brain alive? Very simple, just like the physical exercises help the body performance, the “Neurobics” can improve our mental capacity. “Neurobics” is a science-based program to help you modify your behavior, introducing the unexpected in your brain and mobilizing the help of all your senses throughout the day. The 3 main characteristics of a neurobic exercise is that it has to involve one or more senses in a new context, focus your attention and the transformation of a routine activity in something unexpected and non-trivial. Thus, “an active brain is a healthy brain, while an inactive brain loses its capacity. Or, in simpler words: use it or lose it” (page 37). From my point of view, the most important part of the book focuses on which exercises to do. Below there is a list of the exercises described in the book. Hands on! -Change your morning olfactory association: if you usually wake up with the smell of coffee, change it for something different, such as vanilla, lemon or mint. -Have a shower with your eyes closed: this will activate your other senses. -Brush your teeth with the other hand: this will activate the opposite side of your brain. -Chose your clothes with your eyes closed: it activates your tactful senses. -Use earplugs in the morning to try the world without sound. - Introduce new things daily: change your routine order (have a shower after having breakfast or the other way round); if you always have bread for breakfast, try something different such as oatmeal or tea; change the radio station you always listen to or watch a TV program you never do; walk your dog through a new way or explore other paths when you do your walking. - Read aloud with your partner and take turns. - Drive to your work taking a different journey. - Open your car and start it with your eyes closed. - Exchange your car with a friend to go to work or if you are the one always driving, try going on the back seat. - Open the windows while you drive to smell new aromas. - Create a can with a smell (e.g.: cut a sponge in small cubicles, drop a liquid on them and place them on a can) and try to associate a place with that smell. For instance, open a can and smell it when you are in the kitchen. Try to have one can for each area of your house or places outside. Your brain will associate the smell with the place you go. You may also associate a song with the smell of a can. - Be sociable. Try talking to a person you do not know. Scientific studies have proved that the lack of a sociable life may do severe harm to your cognitive ability. - Have solidarity thoughts. - Change the place of things in your house/work. - Learn Braille or the sign language. - Take somebody to your work for a change. - Have a break for your brains: when you have a break for coffee your brain can relax. - Play chess. Start a new hobby. Take care of a garden. - Try doing something you always do with the other hand. - Visit a street market and pay attention to the smell of each stand. - Change the path you always take in the supermarket, if you always start by buying vegetables, start in a different section. - If you always sit down on the same place while having breakfast, change it with other member of your family. If you live alone, invite somebody for dinner (I’m always available for this kind of invitation haha). - Try eating with your nose closed and only “tasting” the food with your tongue. - Try having food that you used to eat when you were a child. - Change the order you eat on the day: have your breakfast in the evening and vice versa. - Change the environment: candle lights, lights with different colours or even flowers stimulate the brain. - Have breakfast with items from other countries, such as croissant (France), tortillas (Mexico) and so on. - Close your eyes and try to identify the food you will eat (or the wine you’ll drink). - Go to a different restaurant, go camping, go on holidays to a very different place, or just take the car and drive without specific destination. - Create a video, form a band, prepare a script, act! There is so much to do. Keep your brain alive and you will be able to do like the old ladies of a convent in Europe: they are so active and lucid in their 80 years old of age. You have no need to be scatterbrained. Amazing book= amazing brain! Larissa Fauber

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paul Belanger

    An interesting approach to keeping your brain strong. We really do get into routines, and those routines are what end up weakening our brain. A lot of these exercises are easy to accomplish too. I think knowing a few of these, and using them, will help people of every age. Thanks for the insight.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is a quick compilation of the factors behind building and maintaining neural pathways and then lists of things you can do to keep that brain on its toes whether you are at home, at work, or at play. Some good points in easy to digest small bites.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hope Mueller

    2019 must be the year for me to re-read books. This one is a great reminder to practice 'neurobics'. Building new neural pathways to enhance connectivity and elasticity as I age. Both the science and the activities are a fun read. 2019 must be the year for me to re-read books. This one is a great reminder to practice 'neurobics'. Building new neural pathways to enhance connectivity and elasticity as I age. Both the science and the activities are a fun read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Peter Wolfley

    Getting into a routine is generally seen as a positive but it’s basically a Twinkie for your brain. Routines require no thinking and when you’re not thinking your brain is not exercising. Got to break up the routines to keep the brain healthy.

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