web site hit counter Knickers in a Twist: A Dictionary of British Slang - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Knickers in a Twist: A Dictionary of British Slang

Availability: Ready to download

Brits and Americans dress the same, eat at the same chain restaurants, pass music back and forth across the Atlantic, and our national leaders are practically conjoined twins. But the second the Brits open their mouths, all bets are off. So don’t dream of visiting the UK, dating a Brit, or truly understanding what Jude Law is saying without this handy, hilarious, and infor Brits and Americans dress the same, eat at the same chain restaurants, pass music back and forth across the Atlantic, and our national leaders are practically conjoined twins. But the second the Brits open their mouths, all bets are off. So don’t dream of visiting the UK, dating a Brit, or truly understanding what Jude Law is saying without this handy, hilarious, and informative guide to Britspeak. With the cheekiness of Austin Powers and the tidbit quotient of Schott’s Miscellany, screenwriter Jonathan Bernstein’s collection of Cockney rhyming slang, insults culled from British television shows of yore, and regional and “high British” favorites provides hours of educational, enlightening, even life saving hilarity. And if it doesn’t accomplish that, at least you’ll be aware that when a British citizen describes you as a “wally,” a “herbert,” a “spanner,” or a “bampot,” he’s not showering you with compliments. Knickers in a Twist is as indispensable as a London city guide, as spot-on funny as an episode of The Office, and as edifying as Born to Kvetch and Eats, Shoots and Leaves.


Compare

Brits and Americans dress the same, eat at the same chain restaurants, pass music back and forth across the Atlantic, and our national leaders are practically conjoined twins. But the second the Brits open their mouths, all bets are off. So don’t dream of visiting the UK, dating a Brit, or truly understanding what Jude Law is saying without this handy, hilarious, and infor Brits and Americans dress the same, eat at the same chain restaurants, pass music back and forth across the Atlantic, and our national leaders are practically conjoined twins. But the second the Brits open their mouths, all bets are off. So don’t dream of visiting the UK, dating a Brit, or truly understanding what Jude Law is saying without this handy, hilarious, and informative guide to Britspeak. With the cheekiness of Austin Powers and the tidbit quotient of Schott’s Miscellany, screenwriter Jonathan Bernstein’s collection of Cockney rhyming slang, insults culled from British television shows of yore, and regional and “high British” favorites provides hours of educational, enlightening, even life saving hilarity. And if it doesn’t accomplish that, at least you’ll be aware that when a British citizen describes you as a “wally,” a “herbert,” a “spanner,” or a “bampot,” he’s not showering you with compliments. Knickers in a Twist is as indispensable as a London city guide, as spot-on funny as an episode of The Office, and as edifying as Born to Kvetch and Eats, Shoots and Leaves.

30 review for Knickers in a Twist: A Dictionary of British Slang

  1. 4 out of 5

    Petra-X

    The author is a Los Angeles based Glaswegian. This means he is trilingual. US English, British English and Glaswegian which is only understandable if the locals want it to be (and haven't been drinking as much as Glaswegians are famous for). I once shared a flat with a guy from Glasgow who was stunningly handsome (and drank a lot from lunchtime onwards) but I could hardly understand what he said. He pulled more women than the other guys in the flat but I don't know if they understood him any bet The author is a Los Angeles based Glaswegian. This means he is trilingual. US English, British English and Glaswegian which is only understandable if the locals want it to be (and haven't been drinking as much as Glaswegians are famous for). I once shared a flat with a guy from Glasgow who was stunningly handsome (and drank a lot from lunchtime onwards) but I could hardly understand what he said. He pulled more women than the other guys in the flat but I don't know if they understood him any better than I did. I'm wondering as an English-trilingual person (British, American and Caribbean English) how much of this book is mutually intelligible even if the phrases are unfamiliar. We might say toilet, bathroom or restroom but we all know what each other means. Do we with phrases too? These are excerpts from the book. 1. Bingo wings - unsightly blobs of loose skin hanging from the upper arms of OAPs (senior citizens) and people who don't exercise." 2. Bell end, dangly bits, family jewels, goolies, John Thomas, old chap, Percy, todger, bollocks, meat and two veg and winkle. All cock and balls, or one or the other. In the Caribbean 'bud' means penis. So the years that Budweiser held beauty competitions and then did giant posters featuring the winner holding a beer saying "This Bud's for you" were most amusing. Bud caught on eventually and there were no more competitions. I was friendly with one of the winners, very beautiful but a thief and turned into a whore when she couldn't get jobs any longer. Bollocks also means rubbish, nonsense, crap, as in "don't tell me that, it's a load of bollocks". This wasn't in the book, but I'm beginning to think that some of the entries are just a load of bollocks culled from the internet. 4. I was looking at the section on Cockney rhyming slang and seeing how many expressions (of the few in the book) are understood by everyone in the UK. How many of these do Americans know?" Have a butcher's, look at On your todd, being alone Tea leaf, thief Titfer, hat Trap, mouth, as in shut your trap Wick, nerves, as in 'she gets on my wick', she is an annoying person Fell off the back of a lorry - something cheap you bought in the market, like Brixton, or from a "friend" that was stolen goods but no one wants to say that. Give it some wellie - put a bit of effort into it. Not to be confused with Give him some wellie, which means kick him even if he's down. A wellie is a Wellington boot, I don't know what American's call them, gum boots? 5. I'll be mum - I'll pour the tea. Brass monkey weather - freezing cold, from the three brass balls of a pawnbroker's sign. 6. No idea where these came from: Bloody Nora. Gordon Bennett! Stroll on. Pull the other one, it’s got bells on. (I don't believe you). There was plenty more too. Interesting but not very. Amusing, ditto. Enlightening, not at all. 3 star.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Patricia (theinfophile)

    I found it's very important for me to know the difference between a minger, a biffer, and a slag. I like to be accurate in my insults.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    Some favorites so far - Bobs your uncle, Blot one's copybook, Shipshape and Bristol fashion This is a really fun little book full of British slang. I consider myself to be quite the Anglophile so this book is right up my alley! More favorites - Bloody Nora, Close your eyes and think of England, Slog your guts out, Silly buggers, Sod's law, Bubble and squeak, Trainspotter, Twit, Toffee nosed, Upper-class twit, and Silly season. If you don't know what some of those mean, you'll just have to get the boo Some favorites so far - Bobs your uncle, Blot one's copybook, Shipshape and Bristol fashion This is a really fun little book full of British slang. I consider myself to be quite the Anglophile so this book is right up my alley! More favorites - Bloody Nora, Close your eyes and think of England, Slog your guts out, Silly buggers, Sod's law, Bubble and squeak, Trainspotter, Twit, Toffee nosed, Upper-class twit, and Silly season. If you don't know what some of those mean, you'll just have to get the book! I highly recommend it for you Anglophiles out there...;-)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine

    This is a fun dictionary to discover various words (slang) that the British use. Some of the word or terms I know from my travel to The British Isles, but if I am reading a book written by a British author and slang is being used, I use this little book to keep me clued in!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    There's nothing rubbish about this British dictionary. It's right as ninepence! If you're in the mood to muck around, or if you need to find the right dicky bird, here's your source. Or it's something you can take a gander at if you get the collywobbles or the screaming abdabs and need some time to yourself. Have a deco at these toilet words!--lav, bog, khazi, loo, gypsy's kiss, cottage . . . But obviously these are not polite. Only a pillock or a plonker would string them all together like that There's nothing rubbish about this British dictionary. It's right as ninepence! If you're in the mood to muck around, or if you need to find the right dicky bird, here's your source. Or it's something you can take a gander at if you get the collywobbles or the screaming abdabs and need some time to yourself. Have a deco at these toilet words!--lav, bog, khazi, loo, gypsy's kiss, cottage . . . But obviously these are not polite. Only a pillock or a plonker would string them all together like that. Bully for you if any of this makes sense; I'm going like the clappers for my own amusement--talking out of my arse--not sure when I'm going to give over. Maybe half a mo. Doubtless I've made a total bollocks of it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Helen Savore

    I bought this primarily for writing purposes (along with other books), trying to capture some more of the British culture. The more I watch and read the more I wonder if the shared language causes more confusion than it helps. This book did provide a couple of discrete gems, but more then anything helped me think of a tempo, a rhythm, and maybe see a few patterns in the phrases and idioms. I would also say though that I wasn't sure if some of the further explanations were serious or not. Some see I bought this primarily for writing purposes (along with other books), trying to capture some more of the British culture. The more I watch and read the more I wonder if the shared language causes more confusion than it helps. This book did provide a couple of discrete gems, but more then anything helped me think of a tempo, a rhythm, and maybe see a few patterns in the phrases and idioms. I would also say though that I wasn't sure if some of the further explanations were serious or not. Some seemed like obvious plays on the word just presented while others I was simply confused. As someone who is looking to discover new phrases would have liked to see perhaps the translation first, before the word? To help with look-up. Big huge caveat... I have no idea how accurate or not this material is. I am still researching and learning.

  7. 5 out of 5

    JB Beakers

    Funny! It would be to an American, though. I love how it is organized into parts...as in insults, food, body language, etc. I was most impressed that it contains a small section on Polari, which I ran across on GOOGLE shortly before I received the book. Glad I own it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mfly

    Fun...and I feel I understand Ricky Gervais better now.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I appreciated this book as a dictionary, but not so much this author's corny, uninspired sense of humor. I guess I might be being a bit of a stick in the mud about this, but I just wanted to learn some British slang; I didn't need someone to try to present it in a humorous way. Some of the words are funny enough on their own anyways! My favorite is "face flannel" for "washcloth." That's just too adorable.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I was chuffed to bits to receive this book as a gift.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Frank Meier

    A gas read. A bit on the short side, but an easy read. 10 more words required! Strewth! Cobblers is derived from Cobblers' awls, rhyming with Balls.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Raven

    After reading this I might be able to get through the first 10 pages of a Clockwork Orange and have some sort of an idea what the hell is going on. Favorite Quote:“Chance would be a fine thing” Perfect distillation of British pessimism and the enthusiasm at crushing the dreams of others” .

  13. 4 out of 5

    Robert Kiehn

    Great little book on British, Scottish, Irish and general phrases and slang from the UK!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Very very funny and clever.

  15. 4 out of 5

    mundiemom5

    This is a funny and essential reading for the aspiring author who wants to create British characters and the author isn't British.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    My brother gave this to me for my birthday. Now I can speak to British people! I wish I had known about the chapter on Scottish slang before I went to Scotland.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Kozak

    An enlightening and educational read ... even for a soddy div as meself. Ta :)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    It was a bit vulgar for my taste. I was hoping for fun little quips to add to my vocab, but only found a handful of worth while phrases.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline

  20. 4 out of 5

    Celeste Halko

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Payne

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ivy Allen-Sisler

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mickey

  25. 4 out of 5

    Derrick Hudson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andie Nash

  27. 4 out of 5

    Richard Humphrey

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tori

  29. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kari

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.