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Creating True Peace is both a profound work of spiritual guidance and a practical blueprint for peaceful inner change and global change. It is the Venerable Thich Nhat Hanh's answer to our deep-rooted crisis of violence and our feelings of helplessness, victimization, and fear. As a world-renowned writer, scholar, spiritual leader, and Zen Buddhist monk, Thich Nhat Hanh is Creating True Peace is both a profound work of spiritual guidance and a practical blueprint for peaceful inner change and global change. It is the Venerable Thich Nhat Hanh's answer to our deep-rooted crisis of violence and our feelings of helplessness, victimization, and fear. As a world-renowned writer, scholar, spiritual leader, and Zen Buddhist monk, Thich Nhat Hanh is one of the most visible, revered activists for peace and Engaged Buddhism -- the practice he created that combines mindful living and social action. Having lived through two wars in his native Vietnam, he works to prevent conflict of all kinds -- from the internal violence of individual thoughts to interpersonal and international aggression. Now, in this new book, perhaps his most important work to date, Thich Nhat Hanh uses a beautiful blend of visionary insight, inspiring stories of peacemaking, and a combination of meditation practices and instruction to show us how to take Right Action. A book for people of all faiths, it is a magnum opus -- a compendium of peace practices that can help anyone practice nonviolent thought and behavior, even in the midst of world upheaval. More than any of his previous books, Creating True Peace tells stories of Thich Nhat Hanh and his students practicing peace during wartime. These demonstrate that violence is an outmoded response we can no longer afford. The simple, but powerful daily actions and everyday interactions that Thich Nhat Hanh recommends can root out violence where it lives in our hearts and minds and help us discover the power to create peace at every level of life -- personal, family, neighborhood, community, state, nation, and world. Whether dealing with extreme emotions and challenging situations or managing interpersonal and international conflicts, Thich Nhat Hanh relies on the 2,600-year-old traditional wisdom and scholarship of the Buddha, as well as other great scriptures. He teaches us to look more deeply into our thoughts and lives so that we can know what to do and what not to do to transform them into something better. With a combination of courage, sweetness, and candor, he tells us that we can make a difference; we are not helpless; we can create peace here and now. Creating True Peace shows us how.


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Creating True Peace is both a profound work of spiritual guidance and a practical blueprint for peaceful inner change and global change. It is the Venerable Thich Nhat Hanh's answer to our deep-rooted crisis of violence and our feelings of helplessness, victimization, and fear. As a world-renowned writer, scholar, spiritual leader, and Zen Buddhist monk, Thich Nhat Hanh is Creating True Peace is both a profound work of spiritual guidance and a practical blueprint for peaceful inner change and global change. It is the Venerable Thich Nhat Hanh's answer to our deep-rooted crisis of violence and our feelings of helplessness, victimization, and fear. As a world-renowned writer, scholar, spiritual leader, and Zen Buddhist monk, Thich Nhat Hanh is one of the most visible, revered activists for peace and Engaged Buddhism -- the practice he created that combines mindful living and social action. Having lived through two wars in his native Vietnam, he works to prevent conflict of all kinds -- from the internal violence of individual thoughts to interpersonal and international aggression. Now, in this new book, perhaps his most important work to date, Thich Nhat Hanh uses a beautiful blend of visionary insight, inspiring stories of peacemaking, and a combination of meditation practices and instruction to show us how to take Right Action. A book for people of all faiths, it is a magnum opus -- a compendium of peace practices that can help anyone practice nonviolent thought and behavior, even in the midst of world upheaval. More than any of his previous books, Creating True Peace tells stories of Thich Nhat Hanh and his students practicing peace during wartime. These demonstrate that violence is an outmoded response we can no longer afford. The simple, but powerful daily actions and everyday interactions that Thich Nhat Hanh recommends can root out violence where it lives in our hearts and minds and help us discover the power to create peace at every level of life -- personal, family, neighborhood, community, state, nation, and world. Whether dealing with extreme emotions and challenging situations or managing interpersonal and international conflicts, Thich Nhat Hanh relies on the 2,600-year-old traditional wisdom and scholarship of the Buddha, as well as other great scriptures. He teaches us to look more deeply into our thoughts and lives so that we can know what to do and what not to do to transform them into something better. With a combination of courage, sweetness, and candor, he tells us that we can make a difference; we are not helpless; we can create peace here and now. Creating True Peace shows us how.

30 review for Creating True Peace: Ending Violence in Yourself, Your Family, Your Community, and the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    L

    The same feature of this book that caused annoyance was the same that caused understanding: repetition; it works. Like a CBT exercise, this book gets into your subconscious, hammering away at what makes you think the way you do. Lo and behold, the book is complete and you're acting mindfully about closing the covers, craving an orange, and basking in the optimism you're generating from within. I'll admit that even I wanted to pack up and move to a place where I could meditate unstopped. I truly b The same feature of this book that caused annoyance was the same that caused understanding: repetition; it works. Like a CBT exercise, this book gets into your subconscious, hammering away at what makes you think the way you do. Lo and behold, the book is complete and you're acting mindfully about closing the covers, craving an orange, and basking in the optimism you're generating from within. I'll admit that even I wanted to pack up and move to a place where I could meditate unstopped. I truly believed inner peace was a viable thing for me. I think the gift of Hanh's books - reinforcement and encouragement - is what propels one to pursue a simultaneously lightened and enlightened life. I loved that feeling and I'll read more Hanh to get it back. In the meantime, I will continue meditating. There must be something to it… Hanh has some brilliant and insightfully clear observations and anecdotes but criticized too harshly my passion: novels. I don't think "reading to fill empty time" is a bad thing (unless it's Twilight); that irritated me. I have no problem with being mindful about slowly and thoughtfully drinking a cup of tea, but if I want to enjoy that tea with a book in my hand, it's not the end of the world and it doesn't mean I'm succumbing to violence. I also had a bit of a problem with alcohol being a "violent" thing; we cannot judge things by their potential. The stored-up potential of a bag of rice could feed x number of children or x-10 number of adults. We can't apply utilitarian principles to everything lest humanity become numbers and no longer individuals. His thoughts on consumption of violence were things I'd never before thought about and it caused me to be particularly observant of violence in my everyday life. You'd be surprised, horribly surprised. Count the incidents and observable acts. One huge idea this book did succeed in conveying to me (and changing my mind) was the notion that we are all interconnected. I embrace the idea of individual success and individual freedom but it seems it's a façade, after all. I am, indeed, the product of my ancestors; I, in turn, will be the ancestor of others. There is no way to escape the invisible, spider web-thin relationships we all have with each other. The world became an existential soup for me for a while and it made my mind hurt. I concede, Hanh; you are correct on this point. For an inspirational (and spiritual) read, look no further. This is good stuff.

  2. 5 out of 5

    jo

    As usual, I am a bit behind the times. For lent, our church chose to read Creating True Peace: Ending Violence in Yourself, Your Family, Your Community, and the World by Zen Buddhist Thich Nhat Hanh. Well that was during March and April, and while I did read *most* of the book back then, I am finally finishing the last chapter now. Believe me, it was an interesting process reading and discussing a book by a Zen Buddhist with a group of very Maine Congregationalists. When we first picked up this b As usual, I am a bit behind the times. For lent, our church chose to read Creating True Peace: Ending Violence in Yourself, Your Family, Your Community, and the World by Zen Buddhist Thich Nhat Hanh. Well that was during March and April, and while I did read *most* of the book back then, I am finally finishing the last chapter now. Believe me, it was an interesting process reading and discussing a book by a Zen Buddhist with a group of very Maine Congregationalists. When we first picked up this book, I have to admit I groaned a little. Great. This is going to be another of those books that tells you about how you have to fix yourself before you can fix anything else in the world. Which it was. But I found it helpful in a number of ways. Two in particular: 1. Cultivating Seeds This is an analogy my mother used all the time when we were young. "What kind of seeds are you planting? Hitting seeds or sharing seeds?" Thich Nhat Hanh opens his book with a discussion of how we can choose which "seeds" we water in ourselves. (Once again proving that my mother's homespun wisdom is often right up there with the top philosophers and thinkers of our time.) ...our mind is like a garden that contains all kinds of seeds: seeds of understanding, seeds of forgiveness, seeds of mindfulness, and also seeds of ignorance, fear, and hatred. We realize that, at any given moment, we can behave with either violence or compassion, depending on the strength of these seeds within us. Thich Nhat Hanh spends the rest of the book discussing how to cultivate the seeds of compassion. The more we practice compassion, the more it will become a habit, a natural state. Likewise, the more we practice anger, our anger will become stronger and more frequent. It's simple, but very useful and worth being reminded of from time to time. 2. Community One of the last things Thich Nhat Hanh talks about in Creating True Peace is sangha, or community. If we are a drop of water and we try to get to the ocean as only an individual drop, we will surely evaporate along the way. To arrive at the ocean, you must go as a river...We have to train ourselves to see the happiness of our community as our own happiness and to see the difficulties of our community as our own difficulties. Again, simple, but very wise and true. And I believe the author when he says we can "train" ourselves to think this way. Again, like anything, the more we do it, the more it will become a habit.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    I can honestly say that this book has transformed my life in a very positive way. My partner and I both read it, and we were able to draw very practical and simple ways to live, love, and parent more skillfully from Thay's lovely prose. I can honestly say that this book has transformed my life in a very positive way. My partner and I both read it, and we were able to draw very practical and simple ways to live, love, and parent more skillfully from Thay's lovely prose.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I don't think of myself as having any violence within, but I learned something so important when I saw him speak in Berkeley; that by watching violent shows or movies, I am allowing that energy into my energy and condoning its existence in the universal energy. I am not going to get a gun and shoot someone, but allowing violence to be entertainment only continues the cycle of violence. And I struggle with this; I like some violent movies, but I can make a different choice more often than not. It I don't think of myself as having any violence within, but I learned something so important when I saw him speak in Berkeley; that by watching violent shows or movies, I am allowing that energy into my energy and condoning its existence in the universal energy. I am not going to get a gun and shoot someone, but allowing violence to be entertainment only continues the cycle of violence. And I struggle with this; I like some violent movies, but I can make a different choice more often than not. It also can translate to how a parent acts at their children's sporting events or with each other. "Everyone Loves Raymond" is another example of a show I try to avoid; they are so mean to each other and I think it is sad that we think that is funny. They did an episode where one of the kids school counselors wanted to talk about the terrible psychological effects of being around that meanness constantly, and then they turned it into a joke. The reality shows are all about humans being mean to each other which is why I avoid those too. Personal choices, but at least this book makes you think differently!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    I really enjoyed this book. It is about how to create peace for yourself when you are upset and how to help others find peace as well. One thing I really liked about this book is that he talks about the first step to creating peace between you and someone else is deep listening. When we listen deeply and let the other person talk, it gives us a chance to hear their side and their perspective and then we can feel compassion for them instead of anger. I also noticed things here and there in the bo I really enjoyed this book. It is about how to create peace for yourself when you are upset and how to help others find peace as well. One thing I really liked about this book is that he talks about the first step to creating peace between you and someone else is deep listening. When we listen deeply and let the other person talk, it gives us a chance to hear their side and their perspective and then we can feel compassion for them instead of anger. I also noticed things here and there in the book that reminded me of "If God is Love" and "The Power of Now." My favorite thing in this book is that it talked about teaching these ideas to children. Many books I have read about spiritual matters do not address working with children. I really like that this one did and it has some great ideas in it. It also helped me realize that Nakyla is probably using some of these methods on her own, I just wasn't recognizing them.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Peter Kahn

    I keep on reading books on mindfulness in the hope I'll be able to change my angry ways. Thich Nhat Hanh is always good at helping me to realize that I'm both my greatest helper and obstacle. In this time of strife and war, it is also good to remember that violence and hate breed more of the same. The only way to combat my rage or international problems is through thoughtful listening and partnership. Being pissed off doesn't work, I try over and over with the same results.... I keep on reading books on mindfulness in the hope I'll be able to change my angry ways. Thich Nhat Hanh is always good at helping me to realize that I'm both my greatest helper and obstacle. In this time of strife and war, it is also good to remember that violence and hate breed more of the same. The only way to combat my rage or international problems is through thoughtful listening and partnership. Being pissed off doesn't work, I try over and over with the same results....

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Wood

    This book is truly life changing. It really illuminates the grasping, violent aspects of our Western culture -- and shows that it is possible to look at the world in a completely different way. It also explains the purpose of meditation and some techniques for meditation in a practical, totally understandable way. I checked this out from the library but have now bought a copy to keep on my shelf as a reference forever. My admiration for the author is boundless.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    The Buddhist philosophy was good for me to read during a time when I was really stressed out(Breathing in, breathing out). My dad actually recommended the book--he likes the similarity between authors' teachings and his Christian belief system. I agree and I'd like to read more of his books in the future. The Buddhist philosophy was good for me to read during a time when I was really stressed out(Breathing in, breathing out). My dad actually recommended the book--he likes the similarity between authors' teachings and his Christian belief system. I agree and I'd like to read more of his books in the future.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hillary

    I am really glad that this was the first book I read this year. It was beautifully written and had some great reminders that are often forgotten in our hectic lives. I will definately try to incorporate some of his teachings into my daily routines and life.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Y

    This is my second or third read from Hanh and although the title is different, he writes about the same stuff so I didn't feel as though I got any new insights. This is my second or third read from Hanh and although the title is different, he writes about the same stuff so I didn't feel as though I got any new insights.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    the right book for me at the right time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Xandria

    My morning routine really benefits from reading mindfulness books. You all know I am a huge fan of Thich Nhat Hanh; I will probably love anything he writes. There's something so peaceful about how he uses his words that it just seeps right in. The methods in this book are very helpful but not necessarily easy. I've come to discover that practicing mindfulness is challenging, especially in a world filled with technology (which isn't always bad) and distractions. It's easy to want to distract your My morning routine really benefits from reading mindfulness books. You all know I am a huge fan of Thich Nhat Hanh; I will probably love anything he writes. There's something so peaceful about how he uses his words that it just seeps right in. The methods in this book are very helpful but not necessarily easy. I've come to discover that practicing mindfulness is challenging, especially in a world filled with technology (which isn't always bad) and distractions. It's easy to want to distract yourself instead of experiencing difficult emotions. I haven't tried Hanh's approach to ending violence in my family yet but I look forward to building up my practice so that I can possibly broach that topic in the future. I think laying down the groundwork is important and Hanh realizes that it can take days, months, even years to do so. But it's important work before diving into a situation that you can't handle or haven't worked up to yet. The examples he provides on ending violence are helpful and the way that mindfulness is used to save entire populations in times of war is astounding.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Siobhan

    A great one by Thich Nhat Hanh! Like with a lot of practices in various forms of Buddhism the practice s are both simple and hard at the same time. In a world addicted to violence, anger and conflict what Thich Nhat Hanh proposes is pretty radical but any amount of effort and change is better than nothing. This is a book I'll be coming back to. A great one by Thich Nhat Hanh! Like with a lot of practices in various forms of Buddhism the practice s are both simple and hard at the same time. In a world addicted to violence, anger and conflict what Thich Nhat Hanh proposes is pretty radical but any amount of effort and change is better than nothing. This is a book I'll be coming back to.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    The last half of the book I would rate 4-5. It has some very interesting hypothetical conversations concerning changing personal/local/world habits using personal commitment. Certainly helps if you are a monk. The first half of the book concentrates on creating and meditation/calming techniques. Nothing new there

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    "If you cannot deal with the problem of violence and pollution within you, how can you deal with the problem of pollution and violence outside of you, in nature?" This book found me at a timely point in my life. To be read and practiced again, and again, and again. "If you cannot deal with the problem of violence and pollution within you, how can you deal with the problem of pollution and violence outside of you, in nature?" This book found me at a timely point in my life. To be read and practiced again, and again, and again.

  16. 5 out of 5

    April Berry

    I always love Thich Nhat Hanh's writings/teachings. He puts difficult things into such simplicity. This book is more about how to create peace in governments & policy makers. But still some good info for myself & everyone looking for some peace in every day life. I always love Thich Nhat Hanh's writings/teachings. He puts difficult things into such simplicity. This book is more about how to create peace in governments & policy makers. But still some good info for myself & everyone looking for some peace in every day life.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    A wise book from a wise man. His philosophy is much-needed in our troubled times when we are no longer able to talk with each other about important issues. His emphasis on compassionate listening is so important now. I plan to read more books by Thich Nhat Hanh. He has a lot to offer.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Travis Williams

    Another book by Thich Nhat Hanh that brings Buddhist precepts to an accessible space.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Srikanth

    Very well written book that gives us an insight into violence in all facets of life and ways to eliminate it to achieve true peace.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Ardoin

    reading multiple times

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joy Matteson

    My first Thich Nhat Hanh book, and it won't be my last. Almost prescient in its wisdom when it was written in 2004. A beautiful book that deserves a wide readership today. My first Thich Nhat Hanh book, and it won't be my last. Almost prescient in its wisdom when it was written in 2004. A beautiful book that deserves a wide readership today.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Pei Ning

    Excellent for bringing awareness to oneself, especially during emotionally turbulent times. Compassion and deep listening without judgment will light a path towards non-violent, peaceful conversation and understanding. Breaks down thoroughly what "take a moment, deep breaths before speaking again" truly means. Excellent for bringing awareness to oneself, especially during emotionally turbulent times. Compassion and deep listening without judgment will light a path towards non-violent, peaceful conversation and understanding. Breaks down thoroughly what "take a moment, deep breaths before speaking again" truly means.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Guillermo Galvan

    Creating True Peace is more than a book about spiritual enlightenment and peace. It’s a map that helps guide you through the wilderness in ourselves and the hectic world we live in. The destination is inner peace for all living things. Creating True Peace is written by world renowned Zen Buddhist, Thich Nhat Hanh, who has lived through two major wars in his homeland of Vietnam while practicing the philosophy of none-violence and peace. In Creating True Peace, Hanh expresses his solutions for act Creating True Peace is more than a book about spiritual enlightenment and peace. It’s a map that helps guide you through the wilderness in ourselves and the hectic world we live in. The destination is inner peace for all living things. Creating True Peace is written by world renowned Zen Buddhist, Thich Nhat Hanh, who has lived through two major wars in his homeland of Vietnam while practicing the philosophy of none-violence and peace. In Creating True Peace, Hanh expresses his solutions for actively engaging the epidemic of violence invading every level of our lives, from person conflict to war, in concrete ways. This book avoids vague metaphysics that often feel irrelevant when put in the context of modern life. Nhat presents Buddhist philosophy infused with a clear understanding of the global situation today. ‎”Alcohol production requires large amounts of grain that could be used to feed the starving people of the world. Alcohol is directly related to the suffering of children. For instance, to make one glass of rice wine takes a whole basket of rice. Every day 40,000 children die in the world for lack of food. We who overeat in the West, who are feeding grains to animals to make meat, are eating the flesh of these children.” This book embraces all religions and levels of spirituality. It reveals an option; it doesn’t try to strong-arm a way of existing. His stories of living through the horrors of the Vietnam War are saddening and courageous. It exemplifies how even in total madness, peace is powerful enough to sustain us. Nhat introduces the idea of “engaged Buddhism,” which is similar to Martin Luther King’s idea of direct none-violence and civil disobedience with the aim of transforming the hatred and violence in our society into harmonious brotherhood. I highly recommend this book for anyone seeking inner peace in themselves, within their social circle, society, or the world. If you’re interested in learning what Buddhism is about, this is a great way to start. Peace and love to you all.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chanita

    Whether dealing with extreme emotions and challenging situations or managing interpersonal and international conflicts, Thich Nhat Hanh relies on the 2,600-year-old traditional wisdom and scholarship of the Buddha, as well as other great scriptures. He teaches us to look more deeply into our thoughts and lives so that we can know what to do and what not to do to transform them into something better. With a combination or courage, sweetness, and candor, he tells us that we can make a difference; Whether dealing with extreme emotions and challenging situations or managing interpersonal and international conflicts, Thich Nhat Hanh relies on the 2,600-year-old traditional wisdom and scholarship of the Buddha, as well as other great scriptures. He teaches us to look more deeply into our thoughts and lives so that we can know what to do and what not to do to transform them into something better. With a combination or courage, sweetness, and candor, he tells us that we can make a difference; we are not helpless; we can create peace here and now. In Creating True Peace, Thich Nhat Hanh uses a beautiful blend of visionary insight, inspiring stories of peacemaking, and a combination of meditation practices and instruction to show us how to take Right Action. A book for people of all faiths, this is a magnum opus -- a compendium of peace practices that can help anyone practice nonviolent thought and behavior, even in the midst of world upheaval. Creating True Peace tells stories of Thich Nhat Hanh and his students practicing peace during wartime. These demonstrate that violence is an outmoded response we can no longer afford. The simple, but powerful daily actions and everyday interactions that Thich Nhat Hanh recommends can root out violence where it lives in our hearts and minds and help us discover the power to create peace at every level of life -- personal, family, neighborhood, community, state, nation, and world.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cármen Veloso

    I was recommended this book on a time when I was upset very oftenly, as well as sad. When I finally read it, I was already okay. However, that did not prevent me from learning something from it. Thích Nhânt Hanh suggest us, in this book, some methods for us to have self-control over our emotions when we are just too upset, or even when we don't feel like 'fighting' anymore. I found it very interesting how he sees those who are seen as very cruel people: for him, those are the ones suffering the m I was recommended this book on a time when I was upset very oftenly, as well as sad. When I finally read it, I was already okay. However, that did not prevent me from learning something from it. Thích Nhânt Hanh suggest us, in this book, some methods for us to have self-control over our emotions when we are just too upset, or even when we don't feel like 'fighting' anymore. I found it very interesting how he sees those who are seen as very cruel people: for him, those are the ones suffering the most and, thus, 'yelling' for some 'peace and love'. I don't believe, though, all his ideas can be used - or even if they should! Not everything can be solved with a calm and tender speech. Sometimes, some actions are needed. Anyway, I am definately not a self-help book lover - I actually only read the book because I was highly recommended to it, and because this was the only book on my shelf when I finished the previous one. So, if you feel you're in trouble and you'd like to read some friendly words about how to overcome your inner problems, go ahead and read this book. It might help you a lot.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kim Dallmeier

    I have to say I am very underwhelmed by this book as opposed to the other ones I've read by this author. On the positive side, I enjoyed reading about the Mindfulness Training, and how to 'transform arrows into flowers', which was why I chose to read it in the first place. Yet on the other side, I was surprised to find so many of his social activism comments judgmental. We all know our history about wars: The pain, the senseless loss, the destruction. From there, knowing that what has happened is I have to say I am very underwhelmed by this book as opposed to the other ones I've read by this author. On the positive side, I enjoyed reading about the Mindfulness Training, and how to 'transform arrows into flowers', which was why I chose to read it in the first place. Yet on the other side, I was surprised to find so many of his social activism comments judgmental. We all know our history about wars: The pain, the senseless loss, the destruction. From there, knowing that what has happened is done, and that we cannot go back in time to change it, we must learn from it as to not repeat it. This being said, I do not find helpful or "Creating True Peace" comments such as: "The US senselessly wasted many lives in this war when it could have (..)" or "(...) these countries (France and the US) are finally moving in this direction (of helping countries), but this could have happened much earlier (...)". We know the wrong that has happened and is happening in the world. Repeatedly pointing the finger at specific countries, or people, helps no one. We can speak in general terms to get our message across without shaming.

  27. 5 out of 5

    R.C.

    This was a good book. It related the practical advantages of being self-aware and compassionate to the real-world situations around us: our conflicts with our families and friends and also between soldiers and civilians, negotiators and leaders. It offers practical exercises on how we can defuse violence and promote peace in our lives. Most of these are, of course, come from a very Buddhist place, but they are the same sorts of things that anyone who learns to control their anger does: taking a This was a good book. It related the practical advantages of being self-aware and compassionate to the real-world situations around us: our conflicts with our families and friends and also between soldiers and civilians, negotiators and leaders. It offers practical exercises on how we can defuse violence and promote peace in our lives. Most of these are, of course, come from a very Buddhist place, but they are the same sorts of things that anyone who learns to control their anger does: taking a break, stopping a fight by refusing to fight, having a safe place and a confidant who can help you. The stories about living during the Vietnam War were poignant and very relevant. Overall, those familiar with Buddhist philosophy and practices probably won't learn anything new from this book, as there weren't any real surprises. I felt like the author was saying exactly what I expected a Buddhist monk would say about violence and promoting peace. However, this book was a beautiful reminder of how to use these principles in real life.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    Book Review For Creating True Peace: This book is about a guide that lead to peace and helps you calm down with everything you have to dealt with. I like this book because it helps everyone to stay calm and live peacefully when it comes to being stressed out, being angry, or feeling hate. I liked the way the author tells his story about how his life was back than because everything that's surrounds him was horrible and yet he uses his technique to stay calm and live through peace. I felt sad when Book Review For Creating True Peace: This book is about a guide that lead to peace and helps you calm down with everything you have to dealt with. I like this book because it helps everyone to stay calm and live peacefully when it comes to being stressed out, being angry, or feeling hate. I liked the way the author tells his story about how his life was back than because everything that's surrounds him was horrible and yet he uses his technique to stay calm and live through peace. I felt sad when he have to live through about what happen in his past back than because certain people that he meets died in the accident of the Vietnam War and feels sad about it but didn't show it. I rate this book as a 10 because this book teaches me a lesson about how life should be and not let your mix feelings into it

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rubina

    "Peace is not just simply fhe absence of violence; it is the cultivation of understanding, insight and compassion, combined with action. Peace is the practice of mindfulness, the practice of being aware of our thoughts, our actions, and the consequences of our actions." This quote from Thich Nhat Hanh basically surmises what this book is about. Concise and insightful, Thich provides spiritual guidance on how only through inner change and peace can we attain global peace. The teaching on the Five "Peace is not just simply fhe absence of violence; it is the cultivation of understanding, insight and compassion, combined with action. Peace is the practice of mindfulness, the practice of being aware of our thoughts, our actions, and the consequences of our actions." This quote from Thich Nhat Hanh basically surmises what this book is about. Concise and insightful, Thich provides spiritual guidance on how only through inner change and peace can we attain global peace. The teaching on the Five Mindfulness Trainings is profound. Applying it our our daily lives, it creates awareness of the suffering caused by the violence in our thoughts, words and actions, and teaches us to relieve suffering to foster peace and ourselves and others.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Scott

    Amazing book by an amazing teacher/philosopher. It's easy to see why people mourned his death this past year. The world truly lost something with the passing of his spirit. Fortunately we have his written works and what a gift they are. I picked up this book as I was looking to deepen my meditation practice and deal/heal some turbulent relationships (past and present) in my life. Needless to say this straight forward, easy to read book delivers deeply amazing wisdom. With no words wasted, Thich Amazing book by an amazing teacher/philosopher. It's easy to see why people mourned his death this past year. The world truly lost something with the passing of his spirit. Fortunately we have his written works and what a gift they are. I picked up this book as I was looking to deepen my meditation practice and deal/heal some turbulent relationships (past and present) in my life. Needless to say this straight forward, easy to read book delivers deeply amazing wisdom. With no words wasted, Thich Nhat Hanh dives right into the blocks to your own peace, how to build it and keep it. I highly recommend.

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