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The Abuse of Casuistry: A History of Moral Reasoning

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In this engaging study, the authors put casuistry into its historical context, tracing the origin of moral reasoning in antiquity, its peak during the sixteenth and early seventeenth century, and its subsequent fall into disrepute from the mid-seventeenth century.


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In this engaging study, the authors put casuistry into its historical context, tracing the origin of moral reasoning in antiquity, its peak during the sixteenth and early seventeenth century, and its subsequent fall into disrepute from the mid-seventeenth century.

45 review for The Abuse of Casuistry: A History of Moral Reasoning

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    This might be too hard. But from what I have read about it, it's one of those huge contributions to our thinking. It will cost a mint, won't it. Maybe I can sneak into a uni library and read for an hour until my head hurts! This might be too hard. But from what I have read about it, it's one of those huge contributions to our thinking. It will cost a mint, won't it. Maybe I can sneak into a uni library and read for an hour until my head hurts!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Adam DeVille, Ph.D.

    Given the title, you would not expect this to be such a deeply interesting book but it is. It treats moral reasoning in the West during the age of the casuists and manualists before the rise of the modern "ethicist." Fascinating. Given the title, you would not expect this to be such a deeply interesting book but it is. It treats moral reasoning in the West during the age of the casuists and manualists before the rise of the modern "ethicist." Fascinating.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Vern Glaser

    very interesting. well written, although academic...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Theobald Machado

  5. 5 out of 5

    Baloi

  6. 4 out of 5

    John Reis

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mike Bell

  8. 4 out of 5

    David Clarke

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cris

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  11. 4 out of 5

    Durian

  12. 5 out of 5

    Greg Garcia

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jon Fincher

  14. 5 out of 5

    WndyJW

  15. 4 out of 5

    Pamela D Couture

  16. 5 out of 5

    ZxMia

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mac

  20. 4 out of 5

    Johja

  21. 4 out of 5

    Eilev Hegstad

  22. 5 out of 5

    Derek

  23. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    This book is a necessary corrective for moral theologians and philosophers who often dismiss considerations of actual cases as mere "applied ethics." The authors show that any coherent moral tradition must spend much of its time considering both how moral concepts apply to actual situations and, more radically, how these situations serve as a certain measure of the adequacy of its moral concepts. One wishes the authors had spent much more time explaining this moral radical claim. Doing this woul This book is a necessary corrective for moral theologians and philosophers who often dismiss considerations of actual cases as mere "applied ethics." The authors show that any coherent moral tradition must spend much of its time considering both how moral concepts apply to actual situations and, more radically, how these situations serve as a certain measure of the adequacy of its moral concepts. One wishes the authors had spent much more time explaining this moral radical claim. Doing this would likely require a much more adequate explanation of the role of moral theory in casuistry. Similarly one might ask about the authors' understanding of the justification of moral claims. Appeals to casuistry, while essential, seem to presuppose some conception of normativity that is prior to case analysis, a conception that makes ethical quandaries especially salient. Different conceptions of normativity are likely to have an important impact on one's understanding of casuistry but the others fail to address this question. Similarly much more space needs to be devoted to explaining the manner in which actions are properly described such that one can understand the authors' claim that Aristotle denied that their are essences in morals, a claim that Thomists will likely question. Despite these limitations this book is more necessary now than ever. The history recounted in this book ought to inform the debate surrounding Amoris Laetitia ands its relationship to Veritatis Splendor, as should its emphatic defense of the practicality of ethics. Jonsen and Toulmin rightly remind us that ethics cannot be separated from actual cases and that ethicists must not shy away from appreciating and responding to the particularities of each case. Without casuistry, ethics becomes an intellectual exercise that is of little relevance.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  25. 5 out of 5

    John

  26. 5 out of 5

    Patrice

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kristopher

  28. 5 out of 5

    LP

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jurgen Marechal

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alberto

  31. 5 out of 5

    Mary Kay

  32. 4 out of 5

    Mark Buckley

  33. 5 out of 5

    loafingcactus

  34. 4 out of 5

    David Simmons

  35. 4 out of 5

    Frank Spencer

  36. 4 out of 5

    Ian Packer

  37. 4 out of 5

    Marcelo

  38. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  39. 4 out of 5

    Musa

  40. 4 out of 5

    Michele

  41. 5 out of 5

    Anais Fawache

  42. 5 out of 5

    Rick Van der kleij

  43. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Mentzer

  44. 5 out of 5

    Anas Alokka

  45. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Goins

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