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One of the most celebrated comics titles of the late 1990s, PREACHER is a modern American epic of life, death, love and redemption also packed with sex, booze, blood and bullets - not to mention angels, demons, God, vampires and deviants of all stripes. At first glance, the Reverend Jesse Custer doesn't look like anyone special-just another small-town minister slowly losing One of the most celebrated comics titles of the late 1990s, PREACHER is a modern American epic of life, death, love and redemption also packed with sex, booze, blood and bullets - not to mention angels, demons, God, vampires and deviants of all stripes. At first glance, the Reverend Jesse Custer doesn't look like anyone special-just another small-town minister slowly losing his flock and his faith. But he's about to come face-to-face with proof that God does indeed exist. Merging with a bizarre spiritual force called Genesis, Jesse now possesses the power of "the Word," an ability to make people do whatever he utters. He begins a violent and riotous journey across the country in search of answers from the elusive deity. This volume collects issues #1-7 of the series.


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One of the most celebrated comics titles of the late 1990s, PREACHER is a modern American epic of life, death, love and redemption also packed with sex, booze, blood and bullets - not to mention angels, demons, God, vampires and deviants of all stripes. At first glance, the Reverend Jesse Custer doesn't look like anyone special-just another small-town minister slowly losing One of the most celebrated comics titles of the late 1990s, PREACHER is a modern American epic of life, death, love and redemption also packed with sex, booze, blood and bullets - not to mention angels, demons, God, vampires and deviants of all stripes. At first glance, the Reverend Jesse Custer doesn't look like anyone special-just another small-town minister slowly losing his flock and his faith. But he's about to come face-to-face with proof that God does indeed exist. Merging with a bizarre spiritual force called Genesis, Jesse now possesses the power of "the Word," an ability to make people do whatever he utters. He begins a violent and riotous journey across the country in search of answers from the elusive deity. This volume collects issues #1-7 of the series.

30 review for Preacher, Volume 1: Gone to Texas

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark Lawrence

    The young woman with the nose stud who took my payment for this in Forbidden Planet (Bristol) said: "You're starting a weird and wonderful journey, enjoy." She was not wrong. And I did. The story thrives on a combination of graphic violence, humour, and weirdness. The main character, Jessie, the eponymous preacher has acquired a rather fine super-power, he has the voice of God, and when he uses it everyone has to obey him. He is ably supported by his girlfriend (currently a freelance assassin) and The young woman with the nose stud who took my payment for this in Forbidden Planet (Bristol) said: "You're starting a weird and wonderful journey, enjoy." She was not wrong. And I did. The story thrives on a combination of graphic violence, humour, and weirdness. The main character, Jessie, the eponymous preacher has acquired a rather fine super-power, he has the voice of God, and when he uses it everyone has to obey him. He is ably supported by his girlfriend (currently a freelance assassin) and a drunken Irish vampire. The opposition is provided by Jessie's less than lovely family, a Vatican hit squad, and also heaven and hell. Jessie proves to be a rather unusual preacher, a hard-drinking and dangerous man with a violent past. He has questions for God and is unsure what to do with his newfound power. The whole thing is off-beat and addictive. The art is well done and supports the story. When I finished I immediately wanted the next one. It's a series with gallons of potential. My experience reading on is that it goes gradually downhill but even by book 6 it's still a fun read. I've recently watched seasons 1-3 of the TV series based on the graphic novels. It's not a close match but retains the key elements and is good. Give it a watch. Season 4 is imminent! Join my 3-emails-a-year newsletter #prizes .....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    Preacher has so much graphic violence that the makers of the Saw movies can’t read it without projectile vomiting. Preacher has such profane language that Chris Rock would cover his ears if he heard it. Preacher has acts of sexual perversions so disgusting that Larry Flynt once said he would have never taken his case to the Supreme Court if he knew that this was the kind of stuff that would get published. But damn, is it a great story. Jesse Custer, a reluctant redneck minister in a tiny Texas town Preacher has so much graphic violence that the makers of the Saw movies can’t read it without projectile vomiting. Preacher has such profane language that Chris Rock would cover his ears if he heard it. Preacher has acts of sexual perversions so disgusting that Larry Flynt once said he would have never taken his case to the Supreme Court if he knew that this was the kind of stuff that would get published. But damn, is it a great story. Jesse Custer, a reluctant redneck minister in a tiny Texas town gets endowed with the Word of God after bonding to an entity that escaped Heaven. Then he hooks up with Tulip, his gun-toting ex-girlfriend, and Cassidy, a 90-something year old Irish vampire who likes whiskey as much as he likes blood. The three join forces on a quest to find God and kick his ass for his neglect of humanity as they fight an international religious conspiracy and the toughest supernatural killer ever seen in all of creation. It’s not Richie Rich, that’s for sure. It’s really easy to get caught up in the shocking stuff that happens in Preacher. This is a comic series where a character casually states, “ Curiosity won’t just kill the cat. It’ll bite it’s head off and stump fuck the remains ‘til the sun comes up.” And that’s mild compared to some of the other stuff that gets said and done. Frankly, there are images in the panels of Preacher that I’ve sometimes wished I could get out of my head. But look past the shock value, and you’ll find a comic classic with almost limitless ambition and wildly original story to tell. At times, Preacher reads like Irish-born Garth Ennis’s love letter to America. It’s also his exploration of the legends of the American West, the nature of religion, the depravity of people, and the limits of friendship and love. Despite the gore, the sex, the language, and the violence, this is a series with a strong sense of morality. Jesse and his friends are outraged and disgusted by the depths people will sink too, and the quest to find God is a carry over from that. Jesse is angry with what he learns about the nature of God, and sees him as a vain hypocrite who created people and then just lets them suffer while expecting them to praise his name and not lifting a finger to help. And to Jesse’s cowboy nature, that’s an insult that deserves a reckoning. Joe R. Lansdale says it best in his introduction in this volume: “I’m not sure it’s a learning experience, but it’s a thinking experience, but most important…it’s unique, and I hope it’s uniqueness does not encourage a hundred writers to go out and try to repeat it. What they will come up with is just meanness for meanness’ sake. It won’t have the edge, the special feel of PREACHER. They’ll just be imitations. Because there is only one Garth Ennis, and only one Steve Dillon, and only one PREACHER, a tale out of Ireland, dragged through Texas with a bloody hard-on, wrapped in barbed wire and rose thorns. And it’s out to get you.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    This book is something else! Violence, sex, booze and craziness. Sign me up! I read that Seth Rogan is trying to make either a show or movie from this. Lawd Help. Reverend Jesse Custer is just a Texas preacher-then at a service he bonds with a spirit force named Genesis that makes him be able to get people to do as he asks..just by saying it. He teams up with his gun toting ex-lover Tulip and Booze hound Vampire named Cassidy. And dudes..these are the good guys. I need the rest of these boo This book is something else! Violence, sex, booze and craziness. Sign me up! I read that Seth Rogan is trying to make either a show or movie from this. Lawd Help. Reverend Jesse Custer is just a Texas preacher-then at a service he bonds with a spirit force named Genesis that makes him be able to get people to do as he asks..just by saying it. He teams up with his gun toting ex-lover Tulip and Booze hound Vampire named Cassidy. And dudes..these are the good guys. I need the rest of these books..Right now.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    In my opinion, one of the best things about this series is its beginning. If you've never read Garth Ennis before, this is a good place to start. Because odds are, you're going to love this series, or hate it. And, by no small twist of fate, odds are that you're also going to either love or hate Garth Ennis. Why would you hate Ennis? Well, because his work contains graphic ultraviolence, vulgarity, and blasphemy on pretty much every conceivable level. Why would you love Ennis? For pretty much th In my opinion, one of the best things about this series is its beginning. If you've never read Garth Ennis before, this is a good place to start. Because odds are, you're going to love this series, or hate it. And, by no small twist of fate, odds are that you're also going to either love or hate Garth Ennis. Why would you hate Ennis? Well, because his work contains graphic ultraviolence, vulgarity, and blasphemy on pretty much every conceivable level. Why would you love Ennis? For pretty much the same reasons. So my thought is you might as well just in and learn what side of the fence you're going to be on right off the bat.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    So great! I mean, if it hadn't been for just watching the first season of the TV series, I probably never would have picked this up to read, but then I would have been missing out on more irreverent goodness! Believe it or not, this picks up right at the end of the first season's action, although, all the character building has already been done on the show, so I'm rearing to go and ready to see what comes next. Thankfully, there's plenty to enjoy! The Saint of Murderers is great and the bits abou So great! I mean, if it hadn't been for just watching the first season of the TV series, I probably never would have picked this up to read, but then I would have been missing out on more irreverent goodness! Believe it or not, this picks up right at the end of the first season's action, although, all the character building has already been done on the show, so I'm rearing to go and ready to see what comes next. Thankfully, there's plenty to enjoy! The Saint of Murderers is great and the bits about the angels is too sweet and delicious not to chortle over, but the best parts have got to be the interactions between Jessie, Cass, and Tulip. Irreverent barely describes it, and it's a breath of fresh air. New York was a great hoot, too. :) I hope the road trip continues on!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    This did not go the way I expected at all. I haven’t heard a dissenting voice from anyone about Preacher. Not one, although I’ve not looked at any of the reviews here on goodreads. In fact, I’ve had numerous friends say, “You have to read this book,” and, “Dude, you will love this book,” and since it was all from people I trusted, loving Preacher was my expectation. Nope. I hated this book. First, this book is populated by the most idiotic array of stereotypes and caricatures (certainly these ch This did not go the way I expected at all. I haven’t heard a dissenting voice from anyone about Preacher. Not one, although I’ve not looked at any of the reviews here on goodreads. In fact, I’ve had numerous friends say, “You have to read this book,” and, “Dude, you will love this book,” and since it was all from people I trusted, loving Preacher was my expectation. Nope. I hated this book. First, this book is populated by the most idiotic array of stereotypes and caricatures (certainly these characters can’t be called archetypes) outside of a Circus Sideshow:Foul-mouthed, sexed-up, lost his faith Preacher? ✓ Foul-mouthed, sexy, Preacher-loving-hating Moll? ✓ Foul-mouthed, ultra-violent Vampire (but he’s Irish. Isn’t that original? No. Not terribly.) ✓ Foul-mouthed, racist, Texas sheriff? Cormac McCarthy-style, unstoppable, amoral Saint of Killers? ✓ Cocky, arrogant, bureaucratic, disbelieving FBI Agent? ✓ Too butch, sado-masochistic, homophobic homosexual? ✓ Big city, throw-the-book-out-the-window, abusive super-cop and his bumbling partner? ✓ Overbearing warrior Angels, sexy Demons, idiotic heavenly functionary Angels? ✓ An absentee God? ✓ Dog-faced boy?✓I find nothing compelling about this cast of assholes, and I am usually a fan of assholes. I can care about assholes if they are unique and I can believe their behaviour. Not this bunch, though. Second, Garth Ennis is an Irishman writing about a Texan douchebag wandering the U.S., and there are times when it is distractingly obvious that Ennis is not American. His Texan characters speak in ways Texans would never speak. It might not happen often, but it happens enough that I noticed, and oddly enough, when they slip, they speak precisely like someone from Ireland. Go figure. Couldn’t this story have been told just as effectively in Dublin or Belfast as the starting point? Couldn’t the Preacher have been a priest? Perhaps the Vampire could have been a Yank, then? I think it could have been all of these things, and had it been I wouldn’t have found myself constantly being yanked out of the comic by inappropriate vocabulary and regional cadences. Third. the humor was awful. Had one character been a smarmy dipshit, quick with the cutting, insulting banter, I probably would have loved him/her? But the fact that EVERY-SINGLE-CHARACTER (with the exception of Saint of Killers and a cop named Tool) was capable of smarmy dipshittery drove me mad. The dialogue was painfully one note -- and there was a ton of it. The dialogue just goes on and on, like a Quentin Tarantino table talk, but without the entertainment value. If this is any indication of Ennis’ usual writing, my expectations have fallen into a muddy trench; one I’d be happy to leave for the danger of No Man’s Land. Sure there were some interesting moments and wannabe twists (all of which Ennis telegraphed too obviously), but they were not enough to save this comic for me. I worry that I expected too much, though. I truly expected greatness. I thought I was opening something on par with Alan Moore’s best, and with expectations like that there was no way Preacher Gone To Texas could succeed. For that reason alone, I will take a crack at the second volume, but Ennis better hook me with that book or I am all out.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Trudi

    After reading Kemper's awesome review I knew I'd be getting to Preacher eventually -- now after having read the first volume I'm left wondering why the hell did I wait so long?! It's bloody, gory grit and gasoline pulp Texas style, with demons and angels and a possessed preacher, an Irish vampire and a supernatural gunslinger known as the Saint of Killers -- who reminded me instantly of Roland Deschain crossed with Randall Flagg. Something has gone very wrong in heaven: a terrifyingly powerful en After reading Kemper's awesome review I knew I'd be getting to Preacher eventually -- now after having read the first volume I'm left wondering why the hell did I wait so long?! It's bloody, gory grit and gasoline pulp Texas style, with demons and angels and a possessed preacher, an Irish vampire and a supernatural gunslinger known as the Saint of Killers -- who reminded me instantly of Roland Deschain crossed with Randall Flagg. Something has gone very wrong in heaven: a terrifyingly powerful entity (the offspring of an angel and a demon known as Genesis) has escaped to earth and binds itself to a mortal man -- Jesse Custer (redneck preacher of a small Texas parish). Jesse needs answers fast as the dead bodies start to pile up around him and the po-po are hot on his tail. Joining him on his quest (and evasion of the law) will be his ex-girlfriend Tulip, and a ninety-something year old Irish vampire called Cassidy. There's a vicious serial killer on the loose too just to keep things from, you know, getting boring. The word from up on high is that God has left the building. Literally. Fucked off and left humans to fend for themselves. That's not going to stand for Jesse, and he's decided it's time to smoke God out of his hiding hole and get some answers. Maybe even a little payback, who knows? I surely don't, but I can't wait to find out. Yeah so make no mistake: this thing is profane. It's violent. But there's an energy and an aliveness running through the story that's absolutely addictive. I can see why this series has stood the test of time (and will continue to do so I'm sure). But don't take my word for it: in his introduction to the series Joe R. Lansdale calls Preacher "scary as a psychopathic greased gerbil with a miner's hat and a flashlight and your bare asshole in sight." Heh heh. An effective metaphor to make any butt clench up I'm sure. But this is what really got me: Because there is only one PREACHER, a tale out of Ireland, dragged through Texas with a bloody hard-on, wrapped in barbed wire and rose thorns. If that doesn't make you want to pick this series up then check your pulse, because you just might be dead.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ɗẳɳ 2.☊

    WTF?! Oh man, I was really expecting to be blown away here, but this was just a colossal disappointment. 😭 So much so, that I'm not sure if I even care to continue—it was a struggle to even make it through this one. Let's see here . . . two dimension characters, cringe worthy dialog, terrible jokes that mostly fell flat, and a rather dull, juvenile storyline lacking that vital spark. In particular, all the scenes with the Adelphi (some sort of administrative angels) were extremely lame. I didn't c WTF?! Oh man, I was really expecting to be blown away here, but this was just a colossal disappointment. 😭 So much so, that I'm not sure if I even care to continue—it was a struggle to even make it through this one. Let's see here . . . two dimension characters, cringe worthy dialog, terrible jokes that mostly fell flat, and a rather dull, juvenile storyline lacking that vital spark. In particular, all the scenes with the Adelphi (some sort of administrative angels) were extremely lame. I didn't care much for the artwork either. Even the font was annoying and made it difficult to read. Yada, yada, yada . . . no need to get all ranty. I will say that it picked up a bit towards the end, so maybe it does improve in the following volumes—God, I hope so! I just don't understand all the overwhelming love for this series. To borrow a line from my friend Ed - Final Judgment: Lower your expectations.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Renégade ♥

    5 stars Wow. I don't even know what to say... (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] This is not the kind of tale that won't sound a bit nuts if I try to explain or describe it. No matter how hard I try to convey the many reasons it captured my attention and intrigued me or all the times I laughed, cringed, grimaced, exclaimed out loud, and even teared up a time or two along the way. (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] You've just got to read it and dec 5 stars Wow. I don't even know what to say... (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] This is not the kind of tale that won't sound a bit nuts if I try to explain or describe it. No matter how hard I try to convey the many reasons it captured my attention and intrigued me or all the times I laughed, cringed, grimaced, exclaimed out loud, and even teared up a time or two along the way. (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] You've just got to read it and decide for yourself if it's your kind o' cuppa. (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] As I'm sure you've so astutely gathered, Preacher, Volume 1: Gone to Texas totally worked for me. (Yeah, okay, my rating kinda, sorta gave that away, but whatever...) This was some fabulous, disturbing, fascinating crazysauce -- 100 proof. (view spoiler)[ *** *** (hide spoiler)] So I accept that I've fallen down this bizarre rabbit hole. Okay, all right, I jumped in of my own volition. And I'm not even going to try and claw my way out. Still falling, after all. And I've gotta say, though it's pretty damn dark down here, there are glimpses of light from time to time... (view spoiler)[ *** [...] *** (hide spoiler)] Since I've only just begun this journey, I'm really not sure when I'm gonna land or just how hard. But what a trip... *** If you want more actual deets (that don't sound like someone's been hittin' the bong for a little too long), check out this wonderful review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... I'm still too frazzled from this first dose of crazysauce to do any better...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    My problem with some of these "comics for adults" books is that they seem like just that. Its as though a child wanted to prove how adult he was so he filled his book full of sex and swearing and crude jokes so everyone would know he was really mature. And so, as I have found with a lot of these adult comic books, it ends up feeling more juvenile than many of the ones that do not attempt to be labeled as adult. I really wanted to like this book. I had heard it was funny and thought provoking but My problem with some of these "comics for adults" books is that they seem like just that. Its as though a child wanted to prove how adult he was so he filled his book full of sex and swearing and crude jokes so everyone would know he was really mature. And so, as I have found with a lot of these adult comic books, it ends up feeling more juvenile than many of the ones that do not attempt to be labeled as adult. I really wanted to like this book. I had heard it was funny and thought provoking but found it was neither. It tried really hard to be funny, almost as hard as it tried to be shocking. The main purpose of this book though is to shock. But it even fails there since it starts to all feel so juvenile that I can be no more shocked than I could be from a junior high kid who is trying to sound tough. Demons and angels having sex, rapists, congregations exploding, and a kid trying to kill himself but ending up with an "ass face" make up just some of the events in this book put in merely in order to shock. If you want an intelligent funny story with religious, and moral commentary and compelling characters than don't read Preacher. If you want a comic for adults don't read Preacher since it clearly was not meant for adults.If you want obscenity and violence put in for the sake of obscenity and violence, as well as constant attempts to offend, then Preacher is for you. I'm starting to think I don't like Garth Ennis. I shall now put him in the same category as Frank Miller and Mark Millar. As in popular comic book authors that I am not interested in wasting any more time and money on. I am honestly confused by the great popularity of this particular book series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    This was probably the easiest five stars I've handed out to a comic collection. From the insane violence combined with the wildly original story, the first volume of Preacher did exactly what it was supposed to do: hook me and leave me begging for more. Following it's unexpected escape, the dangerous offspring of an Angel and a Demon bonds with Jesse Custer, a lone Texan minister. Now with the word of God embedded within him, Jesse forms an alliance with his ex-girlfriend Tulip and a drunken Iris This was probably the easiest five stars I've handed out to a comic collection. From the insane violence combined with the wildly original story, the first volume of Preacher did exactly what it was supposed to do: hook me and leave me begging for more. Following it's unexpected escape, the dangerous offspring of an Angel and a Demon bonds with Jesse Custer, a lone Texan minister. Now with the word of God embedded within him, Jesse forms an alliance with his ex-girlfriend Tulip and a drunken Irish vampire named Cassidy as they embark on a journey to find God - and not in the "I'm saved/born again" sense but the "I'm going to kick your ass for deserting mankind" sense. I'm going to try and give you my thoughts on the first volume but it would be hard for me to live up to the excellent review written by Kemper. - I honestly have no idea where this is headed, which is awesome. - The excessive violence and the profanity could be distracting IF the writing had been terrible (i.e. Die Hard 2 ). Thankfully, it's not. It never feels like Ennis is throwing all of this offensive material at you to get your attention, it fits right in with the setting and characters he's presenting. - I will admit to being shocked on more than a few occasions. I'm not saying that I have this wealth of experience in "torture porn" films or explicit writing but I've seen my fair share of gore. That being said, some of the stuff contained in this book can be anything from downright frightening to gross. I finished this late last night around 2 a.m. I have a few of the following volumes on deck so I'm hoping this is going to be something I'll breeze through.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paul Nelson

    I may be a little late jumping on the Preacher bandwagon but thankfully I'm on it and this is yet another one I should have read a long, long time ago.   Jesse Custer is our faithless priest who gets possessed by Genesis, the powerful offspring of a forbidden relationship between Angel and Demon. So the story takes place mainly on terra firma with interludes to heaven, where the powers that be don't really want Genesis around, too dangerous and too powerful. So they send the mean old saint of kill I may be a little late jumping on the Preacher bandwagon but thankfully I'm on it and this is yet another one I should have read a long, long time ago.   Jesse Custer is our faithless priest who gets possessed by Genesis, the powerful offspring of a forbidden relationship between Angel and Demon. So the story takes place mainly on terra firma with interludes to heaven, where the powers that be don't really want Genesis around, too dangerous and too powerful. So they send the mean old saint of killers down to take out our hero.   Jesse is a pretty cool character and tagging along we have his ex-girlfriend Tulip who didn't really push any buttons for me and the vampire Cassiday who was a little more interesting in typically violent blood sucking fashion.   The artwork was ok, the story was the clincher for me, ending in our three heroes setting out to find the one and only, God, who has forsaken mankind and is apparently wandering about somewhere after acquiring a suitable disguise. So that's the endgame find the all-powerful, who probably doesn't want to be found, so let's get on it. And I've found God by the way, he's on Twitter and often professes words of wisdom for us mere mortals.   Next up The Boys & 100 Bullets, can’t wait. Also posted at http://paulnelson.booklikes.com/post/...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    3.5 Stars. To be honest, I was so close to marking this as a DNF at the start of this volume. I thought it was really hard to get into it and I wasn't enjoying it at all. I'm glad I gave it a chance though because I feel like I'll really enjoy reading this comic series. The second half of the volume was definitely much better than the first half. It also made a lot more sense to me. I wasn't really enjoying the artwork much either at the start but it definitely grew on me. I feel like this is a 3.5 Stars. To be honest, I was so close to marking this as a DNF at the start of this volume. I thought it was really hard to get into it and I wasn't enjoying it at all. I'm glad I gave it a chance though because I feel like I'll really enjoy reading this comic series. The second half of the volume was definitely much better than the first half. It also made a lot more sense to me. I wasn't really enjoying the artwork much either at the start but it definitely grew on me. I feel like this is a really original idea and I'm excited to see where it goes. I would recommend this series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Oriana

    book #11 for Jugs & Capes & my latest entry at CCLaP First of all, I understand that it is totally unfair to read only the first two volumes in a series and purport to have a reasonable grasp of said series. My friend Keith, a crazed comics fan who has become the unofficial backseat-driver of my comics tastes, criticized Jugs & Capes for this when we read the first two volumes of Fables a few months ago. He sees this as a problematic pattern: the indie comics we're reading are all self-contained, book #11 for Jugs & Capes & my latest entry at CCLaP First of all, I understand that it is totally unfair to read only the first two volumes in a series and purport to have a reasonable grasp of said series. My friend Keith, a crazed comics fan who has become the unofficial backseat-driver of my comics tastes, criticized Jugs & Capes for this when we read the first two volumes of Fables a few months ago. He sees this as a problematic pattern: the indie comics we're reading are all self-contained, but then we're trying to "get a taste" of mainstream comic series by reading the intros to different series, thus putting mainstream comics necessarily at a disadvantage. But what else can we do? If you're not a die-hard comics-phile with limitless time to dedicate to seventy-plus-issue series, how else can you even get started? And listen: I get that you wouldn't try to judge an entire prose novel on the strength of its opening chapters, but you would decide from that whether you wanted to keep reading or just ditch the book and find something else. No one thinks that's unfair. So while I admit that I didn't read nearly enough to judge Preacher as a series, I do think I have the right to discuss how the first books affected me, and why I have little intention of reading any more. The other introductory comment I'd like to make is that we were all primed for Preacher by reading reviews insisting that this series was not for the faint of heart, that there was pretty much something here to offend everyone—the blood and gore were horrifying, the language exaggeratedly profane, the plot obscenely sacrilegious, and on and on. So though I am a bit squeamish when it comes to violence, I love cursing and hate organized religion (more on this later), and I was kind of pumped to see if these books really could offend me. Turns out: not really. So. Preacher is the story of reluctant redneck preacher Jesse Custer, his sort-of girlfriend Tulip, who is a hitwoman and general bad-ass, and Cassidy, their angry drunk vampire buddy. Oh, and it's also about how God has abandoned his post in Heaven, a demon boning an angel to spawn a scarily powerful force called Genesis, Jesus as an overbearing prick, and a dirty, angry, cruel, horribly fucked world. As expected, the profanity didn't bother me, the blasphemy made me mostly giggle, and the violence... well, the violence did upset me, but not how I'd thought it would. The truth is, I was more upset when the violence stopped upsetting me than I was when it did. I don't mean this in the "We're all going to become criminals because of desensitization to violence in pop culture" way, but I do think that desensitizing your readers does a serious disservice to your book and your point. Preacher is supposed to be edgy and dark and devastating, but after you see a man whose flesh has been cut from his face, a hideously disfigured failed suicide, an angel with the back of his head blown off (brains visibly dripping through the hole), and dozens and dozens of shootouts and bar brawls and stabbings, it just stops being shocking. And then what's the point? I suppose I respect the fact that they kept finding new and different ways of hurting and killing people, but it was a somewhat bored admiration, a cataloguing of novelty rather than an appreciation of the intensity of the scenes. And to me, that's a failure. And speaking of failures? Racism / homophobia. I get that this story takes place in Texas, and I get that there are all kinds of closed-minded people in the South. But there are scenes that are just too much, like one where a band of cops bat about the n-word and f-word (not fuck, the other one) willy-nilly. No. What's the point? It wasn't even as if it were targeted; if one of the characters had been black or gay and the cops'd shouted slurs at him or her, okay, maybe. But this was a different thing, this was just racism as a shortcut to characterization, which is awful. There are lots and lots of other ways to demonstrate that these men are ignorant and stupid. If this was done as an attempt to shock and push the same boundaries that the extreme violence does, that seems juvenile as well as offensive. (So maybe Preacher actually did manage to offend me?) Worse than lazy characterization, I think the racism played a part in making the overall plot more clichéd. Even though our "hero" is a gun-toting, violent semi-psychopath, our ragtag cast of "villains" are even worse—way worse. And one of the laziest ways to make a sharp distinction between the good guys and bad is to show that the bad cop is a racist homophobe. I felt the same kind of failure—lack of nuance, lack of development—in the "good" guys. Jesse and Cassidy are dangerous motherfuckers, but they seem to view violence as an itch that needs to be scratched, not a last, or even second, reactive resort. At one point they kill a dozen men in a bar because one of them denigrated Laurel & Hardy. Sorry, but that's fucking ridiculous, especially since Jesse is meant in some ways to be a moral arbiter. He's a preacher, for goodness sake! I get that he's also a "good ol' boy," but that doesn't go far enough for me. In order to show morality, I need some gradual buildup to violence, I need to see him try to reason with people before breaking their fingers, I need to believe that he'd really rather not have to kill yet another yokel, but he will if he really really has to. Otherwise he's just a nasty thug, little better than the nasty thugs he's senselessly butchering. And finally, let's talk about the religious stuff. I'm a pretty staunch atheist, raised Jewish, and I tend to regard modern religions in the same way I do ancient mythology: as wild stories. Often allegorical stories, sure, but I have none of the religious hangups or residual guilt that so many modern (and especially lapsed) Christians do. So the Catholic guilt aspect of this story—which is clearly another of its shortcuts to emotional intensity—didn't affect me the way it likely would have if I were, say, a Catholic. I guess that means I'm missing a significant part of the impact of this story, but it also means I could treat it like a story, without bringing any emotional baggage to it. In any case, I'm not saying Preacher was all bad; I did find the plots engaging and the dialogue punchy and believable. The art was of a type, of course, but clearly top-notch, especially the poster-quality chapter openers (which Keith informed me are the original covers of the single issues). The cursing didn't seem nearly as overdone as the violence, and the religious themes were interesting in the same way any fantasy plot would be. But look, in such a massively overcrowded media landscape, when every book I read means at least a hundred others that I never will, this one (well, these two) just didn't do it. Of course, let's bring it back to the idea that these two books are possibly just an intro, a bit of throat-clearing and balance-finding, and most likely if I were to read more of the series, I'd get more and more enmeshed in the story. But I just don't feel like it's a story I particularly care to get enmeshed in. As with all epic fantasy, I'm sure the good guys are going to win, and of course Jesse and Co. will kick a lot of motherfucking ass while doing it, probably up to an including the asses of God, Jesus, and all the angels. I'm sure it'll be an interesting (and very, very bloody) journey to watch them get there, and I hope lots of people enjoy following it. I just won't be one of them.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Well I wish could go back in time and punch myself in the face, because this book is awesome. Take it from me, sometimes one read is not enough for something that's really different. Preacher is this insane mix of western, supernatural horror, romance, and black comedy. One of those "impossible" genre combos but it seems to work, at least for me on a second read. It's dark, romantic, creepy, hilarious, exciting, crude, and horrifying. It can definitely be offensive to the religious, the animal l Well I wish could go back in time and punch myself in the face, because this book is awesome. Take it from me, sometimes one read is not enough for something that's really different. Preacher is this insane mix of western, supernatural horror, romance, and black comedy. One of those "impossible" genre combos but it seems to work, at least for me on a second read. It's dark, romantic, creepy, hilarious, exciting, crude, and horrifying. It can definitely be offensive to the religious, the animal lover, the southerner, the Texan, the police, the criminal, the teenager, pretty much everyone. But that's good, because we're all too serious and self-important anyway. "Christ, I think I'd grow old overnight if I lost you." Hidden under Garth Ennis' wild violence and profanity is a story of drama. Jesse Custer, our hero, suddenly has incredible power and finds himself in the company of an Irish vampire, Cassidy, and his ex-girlfriend Tulip. There's John Wayne, angels and demons, something called Genesis, and the Killer of Saints. But it's really Jesse's story of coming of age through absolute hell, and his arrival upon his well-deserved power and vengeance, that is the meat and potatoes of the book. And it's filled with brilliant writing like the quote above. Between Steve Dillon illustrating, one of my all time favorites Matt Hollingsworth coloring, and Glenn Fabry illustrating the covers, this is a fantastic looking book! It's basically the style that Image is going for these days, clean lines, deep colors, realistic but still cartoony. And it just works great. I really enjoyed looking at these images. And those covers are industry-topping. Like Brian Bolland-level. Read this!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Some weeks ago I’ve seen the trailer of the tv series and with the help of a friend here (thanks a lot, Jessica) I started this first book. I didn’t know much about the plot, only the few things I read in some reviews and on the book page. Nothing could prepare me to this. I heard the name of Garth Ennis for the first time with this comics, but I will not forget anytime soon. This is an incredible story, with at the center three unlikely heroes: Jesse Custer, a precher possesed by a spiritual for Some weeks ago I’ve seen the trailer of the tv series and with the help of a friend here (thanks a lot, Jessica) I started this first book. I didn’t know much about the plot, only the few things I read in some reviews and on the book page. Nothing could prepare me to this. I heard the name of Garth Ennis for the first time with this comics, but I will not forget anytime soon. This is an incredible story, with at the center three unlikely heroes: Jesse Custer, a precher possesed by a spiritual force, able to compete with God, his old girlfriend, Tulip and Cassidy, an Irish vampire. The goal: find God, mysteriously disappeared and face him. The story is amazing, violent, blasphemous, with some ideas about religion and myth that are brilliant, intriguing and crazy. Ennis put many human question about God to a practical basis, using a disillusioned preacher for give a voice to them. Besides, he develop then in a excellent way, showing the worst side of the society through all the violence of which human beings are capable. The artwork is not so defined, but you have to think that it has more than twenty years. Besides, it reachs the top in the pictures about supernatural, for example in the different types of angels and their skills, but also in the representation of violent scenes, that in many cases are more efficient than words. Interesting to note that there is a western tone in this story, regarding the clashes between the team and the police, some of Jesse's principles, but also for a certain friend of him. Personally, I love this series, but I understand this is not for all.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Danger

    2ND READ-THROUGH: It’s been about 8 years since I first read Preacher, and since I’ve been watching (and loving) the new television series, I figured what better time to revisit the source material? While the show and the comic are vastly different, at least in terms of story (the characterizations seem fairly consistent), I found this first volume to be everything I remembered. Violent and funny and nihilistic and strange. Since originally reading this, I’ve regarded it as my “favorite comic se 2ND READ-THROUGH: It’s been about 8 years since I first read Preacher, and since I’ve been watching (and loving) the new television series, I figured what better time to revisit the source material? While the show and the comic are vastly different, at least in terms of story (the characterizations seem fairly consistent), I found this first volume to be everything I remembered. Violent and funny and nihilistic and strange. Since originally reading this, I’ve regarded it as my “favorite comic series of all-time,” and after re-reading this, I still stand by that.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Garth Ennis is definitely one of my all-time favourite comic book writers. I forget which series I read first - his Punisher MAX run I think followed by The Boys - but I do remember coming to Preacher very late in the game, despite being told it was his finest work to date. And I remember reading it and thinking, no, it’s not. Re-reading it recently, I’m still not convinced and I’m baffled at most readers’ overwhelmingly positive response to it. Jesse Custer is a former bad boy turned preacher i Garth Ennis is definitely one of my all-time favourite comic book writers. I forget which series I read first - his Punisher MAX run I think followed by The Boys - but I do remember coming to Preacher very late in the game, despite being told it was his finest work to date. And I remember reading it and thinking, no, it’s not. Re-reading it recently, I’m still not convinced and I’m baffled at most readers’ overwhelmingly positive response to it. Jesse Custer is a former bad boy turned preacher in a Texan town who one day gets superpowers from God and accidentally burns his entire flock alive. He meets his old flame/hitman, Tulip, and a random stranger called Cassidy who’s also an Irish vampire, and together they look to hunt down God - who’s on Earth somewhere - and tell him what a lousy job he’s doing with Creation. Meanwhile, the Saint of Killers, an unstoppable killing machine, is on Custer’s trail. The book opens with Jesse, Tulip and Cassidy sitting around a cafe table nattering away, and it’s this setup that bothered me the most in the volume: they’re always sat round cafe tables reminding themselves (and the reader) who they are, what they’re doing, and why they’re doing it. I guess Ennis really liked Pulp Fiction and Tarantino’s other movies and thought it’d be riveting to have his characters mimic that style - and that’s fine, there were plenty of Tarantino copycats in the wake of Pulp Fiction - but he can’t emulate Tarantino’s dialogue successfully enough and instead his expositional summary dumps became extremely trite long before the end. The characters didn’t grab me - I don’t really care about boring Jesse whose quest to find God or whatever isn’t interesting in the least, and the other characters like Tulip are about as two-dimensional as you can get. Cassidy plays the louche slacker (a quintessential 90s archetype that still annoyingly crops up now and then) whose jokes fall flat every single time. “I’ve got this brilliant recipe for quiche. You make the quiche, right, an’ then you cook it, an’ then you throw the stupid fuckin’ thing out the window. Then you grill yourself a t-bone an’ eat that instead.” Ugh. He comes up with drivel like that all the time and it’s so irritating. I’ve seen lots of reviews that mention that Preacher is gory and bloody, etc., and it is but not enough to really warrant it being THE thing to know about the book. If you’ve read Ennis before, you’ll already know he writes gory comics - The Punisher, The Boys, Jennifer Blood, War Stories, hell, practically every Ennis book contains the same amount of gore as you see in Preacher, so I’m not sure why it’s worth pointing out about this comic. It’s a bloody story but no more so than any other Ennis and/or Steve Dillon book you’ll read. The setup is just boring. Some weird thing from Heaven (which is real) called Genesis has escaped and become part of Custer who now has the Word of God, meaning he can will whoever into doing anything he wants with his voice. And because the world’s gone to pot, Custer’s going to find God and tell him to sort it out, make him care somehow, probably using the Word of God? Meh. I’m not sure why Tulip or Cassidy are along for the ride either. I guess neither have anything much going on? Which is always a compelling motivation to have… I really like Steve Dillon’s art so seeing that here is always awesome, and Ennis’ murder mystery in New York City at the end was ok. At least that had a story rather than characters standing about telling the reader about themselves and their situation while they waited for the Saint of Killers to show up. You can also see the prototype for Detective Soap from Welcome Back, Frank in Detective John Tool - the two are comically incompetent detectives chasing after much more competent criminals. And Arseface still makes me laugh - he’s a Kurt Cobain fan who tried committing suicide the same way as his hero with a gun in the mouth but miraculously lived and whose face now looks like an arse! The scenes where he’s trying to be upbeat and cheerful to his grim father who can’t bear to look at his son were so damn funny. But overall there’s very little to like in a 200+ page book that’s hugely rated by the majority of readers. First volumes aren’t always indicative of the series as a whole. I wasn’t that impressed with the first volumes of Sandman, Y: The Last Man and Scalped but went on to adore the rest of the series. And Ennis has written enough brilliant books to warrant a level of trust other writers wouldn’t, so I’ll keep on with Preacher. But Gone to Texas is a surprisingly very weak first book in such an acclaimed series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    توفيق عبد الرحيم

    So far so Good i will do quick character introduction of every well made character we have seen so far 1-Jesse Custer (The Preacher) Jesse is a preacher who have lost his faith we know that when he spills out all the secrets of the little town he lived in that was supposedly told to him in the confines of the church Jesse is possessed with a heavenly spirit called genesis without consciousness which is a product of an angel and a devil fucking each others brains out After being possessed by Genesis So far so Good i will do quick character introduction of every well made character we have seen so far 1-Jesse Custer (The Preacher) Jesse is a preacher who have lost his faith we know that when he spills out all the secrets of the little town he lived in that was supposedly told to him in the confines of the church Jesse is possessed with a heavenly spirit called genesis without consciousness which is a product of an angel and a devil fucking each others brains out After being possessed by Genesis he acquires a power that is very powerful but in my opinion its not as powerful as the power of god , so this power forces anyone to do whatever Jesse tells them to do when he uses it on them. 2.Cassidy (The Vampire) Cassidy is a vampire we are not sure how many years old he is but he is ancient even though he left at the end of this volume but i believe he will be back he is a very loyal friend and Sy being the asshole he turned out to be was a bit much for him so he is taking a break. 3.Tulip(The contract killer) So far we don't know much about Tulip she is the ex-girlfriend of Jesse we see her at the first issue trying to kill a guy with a pistol but misses him and fucks up the mouth of the person beside him She seems to be a contract killer but we don't know for sure yet whats her deal. 4. Hugo root (The Racist Sheriff) Every comic book needs one of these guys i will never forget what he said about the massacre of anneville I'm telling you this is the doing of martian niggers lol He is fucked up in the head and he deserved his death the guy didn't even say any word to his son till he needed to use him to kill himself 5. The Saint of killers (name and nickname lol) This guy is an unstoppable killing machine assassins and super soldiers are boy toys next to him It looks like he is the killing machine of the heavens but he seems to have some kind of power against them as well they send him to kill someone but they cant call him back unless he kills that someone we see this evidently when he warns them that if they didn't answer he will kill half the population of earth. 6.The adephi (The scientist angels) Pilo , Fiore , DeBlanc It seems that Deblanc is they boss somehow the adephi are angel scientists they are lower then the seraphi which are the warrior angels so the adephi answer to them Pilo dies after waking The Saint of killers and Fiore And Deblanc are cast into a big black hole by the seraphi after they learn that they lost Genesis 7.The seraphi (The warrior angels) They run the kingdom of heavens now since god has abandoned his duties. What about the haircut and tattoo Genius artist really. 8. ArseFace That is a name worthy of some fucked up super hero this kid was deformed due to shooting a gun at himself if i remember correctly he is the son of Sheriff roots his father who hasn't spoken a word to him since the accident doesn't even look at him It is so weird to see this kid living like that with no issues talking away to his father and not a care in the world it doesn't seem right but anyway this is how it is and when his father dies he promises to take revenge on whoever did this to him how far did he go we don't know we don't see him again but there is a limited series about him and a limited series about the saint of killers as well Now Enters the first event Naked City and its all about the serial killer really its running in the back and we learn about all of it near the end when they reveal all the cards. 9. John Tool (The unluckiest cop on planet earth) Tool is a shy person he keeps to himself he is very clumsy and that would get you killed his luck turns around for a bit after the revelation about his partner cop but it catches up to him again and he loses both his hands in an accident 10 . Paul Bridges (The Tormented gay cop) i bet everyone thought that Tool is the gay one but no we learn out that the mucho cop is actually a gay and he is tormented because he hates gays only to turn out one himself He is the no 1 cop everyone tells stories about how brave and smart he is but we see him a bit off there is something wrong about him only to learn later that he is tormented about what he does behind clothed doors and its fucking his life and mind up 11. Si coltrane (The reporter/The serial killer) It was a total surprise for me that this guy turned out to be the serial killer they even made bridges disappear for a while so that we don't suspect Si plus for me there was always the probability that the serial killer is someone we haven't seen his face yet anyway Si conjures the best plan he could come up with to get rid of everyone and not get caught for his crimes but his plan was too flawed really Cassidy got out way too easy he should have guessed that this would happen since he knows that he is a vampire and all. anyway amazing start sorry for the long review i enjoyed the first volume looking forward to reading the rest of the series <3

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    This is a review of the entire series. Preacher follows a gang of three washed-up misfits that have all been dealt cruel hands by fate. First there’s Jesse Custer, a vulgar, foul-mouthed yet all-around upstanding and gentlemanly preacher living a dull life in a small Texas town called Annville. He wears the mantle of a preacher while exuding the aura of a gritty, spaghetti western antihero. He spends more time praying to John Wayne and channeling Clint Eastwood than he ever spends seeking guidanc This is a review of the entire series. Preacher follows a gang of three washed-up misfits that have all been dealt cruel hands by fate. First there’s Jesse Custer, a vulgar, foul-mouthed yet all-around upstanding and gentlemanly preacher living a dull life in a small Texas town called Annville. He wears the mantle of a preacher while exuding the aura of a gritty, spaghetti western antihero. He spends more time praying to John Wayne and channeling Clint Eastwood than he ever spends seeking guidance from God. Things take a major turn for Jesse when he accidentally gets possessed by the spirit of a supernatural entity called Genesis, the cursed child born out of the forbidden fornication between an angel and a demon. The entity contains the essence of absolute goodness and absolute evil, fusing together with Jesse’s soul and granting him unimaginable power. Now a force to be reckoned with, Jesse makes himself quite a few dangerous enemies and he doesn’t plan to let his newfound powers go to waste. He has a bone to pick with the scum of the earth and plans to use his powers to make amends with his past trauma and regrets. Most of all, he has it out for God more than anyone else for allowing all the chaos and evil in the world to spiral out of control in the first place. He goes on a journey to find God and give him a piece of his mind. Along his journey, Jesse reunites with his ex-girlfriend Tulip and befriends an Irish, vampire junky named Cassidy. Tulip is a hotheaded gunslinger that was raised by her tough-as-nails yet affectionate, sharpshooting father who taught her how to hunt, stand on her own two feet and take no nonsense from anybody. She’s a wild tomboy with a lot of heart and has quite a bit of catching up to do with Jesse after he abandoned her for unknown reasons at the peak of their relationship. After hearing Jesse’s story about fusing with Genesis and going on a mission to find God with his newfound powers, Cassidy happily joins the preacher on his quest while Tulip works on patching things up with Jesse after learning of the dark secrets behind his sudden disappearance. Cassidy also has some demons of his own to work out as he battles with alcoholism, drug addiction and a wavering moral compass on top of never being able to walk around in broad daylight because of the curse of vampirism placed on him as a young boy. Despite their numerous imperfections, the three come together in hopes of finding God. Not in the metaphorical sense, but to kick his ass for abandoning his throne in heaven, neglecting his duties and letting humanity drown in the cesspool he created with his own hands. The three outlaws seek to set things right through very unsavory means. Jesse, Tulip and Cassidy encounter some incredibly disturbed villains along the way, including Jesse’s own family of backwater devils that include a tyrannical religious grandmother obsessed with maintaining pure bloodlines, a violent psychopath that brutally murdered anything Jesse dared to love as a child, and a crazed hillbilly with a fetish for farm animals. Then there’s a secret religious order akin to the Illuminati called The Grail, which includes the outrageous Klaus Starr whose violent antics along with his obsession of trying to use Jesse’s powers to fulfill his own plans usually end up leaving him with a few missing limbs and making a mockery of himself. There’s even a KKK loonie that built himself a giant sex doll made out of the severed, bloody body parts of butchered livestock. The violence is so outrageously gruesome that it somehow manages to be equally horrendous and hilarious. A lot of the dark and shocking moments in this series are delivered with heavy undertones of black comedy, making you laugh, cringe and gag all at the same time. It’s a wild ride that pulls no punches, and the scares are absurdly creative if nothing else. The three protagonists have a lot of depth to them, every villain is a wicked bastard and the side characters all have their own heartwarming struggles to overcome. The most notable minor character that I was rooting for from beginning to end was a mentally disabled boy nicknamed Assface. The boy idolized Kurt Cobain to an unhealthy degree and unfortunately, he thought that following in his idol’s footsteps by blowing his head off with a gun would earn himself the love and admiration he always wanted. After his failed suicide attempt, he’s left with a gaping hole that continuously oozes fluid from his now deformed face, which earned him the nickname Assface. Instead of letting his deformity bring him down, he goes on his own personal journey of self-discovery and finding comfort and acceptance through rock music. This is just one of many touching tales throughout the series. Preacher is outrageous, shocking, and it isn’t afraid of offending anybody with its sharp-edged humor, but it also captures the personal flaws and imperfections that every single person carries. The action is spectacular, the characters are heroic and monstrous in equal measure, and you can never prepare yourself for whatever bizarre travesties it will throw at you next. Stephen King even cited Preacher as being a big inspiration behind his surreal fantasy masterpiece The Dark Tower, and it’s not hard to see how. It’s the perfect blend of gritty western, dark fantasy, shock humor and over the top horror-fueled action sequences. It’ll definitely send you through an unforgettable trip through the wild west. *** My Social Media My YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPPs... My Instagram Account: https://www.instagram.com/michael_sor... My Wattpad Account: https://www.wattpad.com/user/Michael-... My Twitter Account: https://twitter.com/SorbelloHorror My Facebook Account: https://www.facebook.com/michael.sorb...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ronyell

    Introduction: After reading so many graphic novels that were geared towards older teens and adults (Neil Gaiman’s “Sandman” series and Bill Willingham’s “Fables” series), I never would have thought that I would come across a graphic novel that has coarse language practically littered out throughout the entire story while dealing with a subject matter that is so controversial to many readers. That graphic novel, my friends, is “Preacher: Gone to Texas” and man, was I in for a wild ride of my Introduction: After reading so many graphic novels that were geared towards older teens and adults (Neil Gaiman’s “Sandman” series and Bill Willingham’s “Fables” series), I never would have thought that I would come across a graphic novel that has coarse language practically littered out throughout the entire story while dealing with a subject matter that is so controversial to many readers. That graphic novel, my friends, is “Preacher: Gone to Texas” and man, was I in for a wild ride of my reading life! What is this story about? Reverend Jesse Custer was a minister who was starting to lose his followers and his faith in God. But one fateful day, Jesse Custer is hit by a bright light which ends up destroying the church he was holding his sermons in. Jesse survives the catastrophe, but everyone who attended the church was all killed and Jesse ends up being on the run from the law while gaining the power called “the Word of God” where he can control people into doing what he wants. Joining him is his ex-girlfriend Tulip and an Irish vampire named Cassidy (vampires? Yeah, this story is getting weirder) and the three companions set out on a journey to find God, who had quit his job in heaven, so that way, Jesse would get his answers about why Genesis is inside his body. Unfortunately, a hunter sent by Heaven is after Jesse and his gang in order to prevent Jesse from finding out the truth! What I loved about this story: Garth Ennis’s writing: Wow…just wow. Now before I get into what I enjoyed about Garth Ennis’s writing, I would like to point out how shocked (and impressed) I was with the amount of language in this graphic novel. Never, had I read a graphic novel that managed to drop the “f” bomb on every single page along with some other coarse language. This actually interested me rather than disgust me because I was basically counting how many curse words popped up on each page every time a character was speaking and I had a fun time with it! Since this is basically the first graphic novel I had read by Garth Ennis, I was amazed at the creativity being put into this story, especially for the fact that Garth Ennis took a subject matter so controversial (in this case, religion) and turned it into an interesting fantasy story that was extremely well written. It was also interesting in how Garth Ennis explored American culture through Texas and how the main characters are the ones who are more sympathetic than the rest of the characters featured since they are trying to make the world a better place, no matter how TWISTED it may sound! My favorite character in this story was probably Cassidy, the Irish vampire as it was so unusual to see a vampire pop up in a story about religion. I also loved his personality as he is probably the funniest character in this story and I loved the fact that he was willing to help out Jesse and Tulip when they really needed it. Steve Dillon’s artwork: Steve Dillon’s artwork was pretty impressive as the characters’ facial expressions are realistic and effective. I also loved the way that Steve Dillon illustrated the gruesome scenes of some of the characters being killed and the artwork was done so vividly that I found myself cringing at the murder scenes. What made me feel uncomfortable about this story: All the negative things that I had mentioned (murders, controversial use of religion, language) are actually things that I did enjoyed about this story since it is rare for me to read a graphic novel that is basically covered from head to toe with offensive content, so it was basically second nature to me when I was reading this volume. However, this might not go over well for anyone who does not like coarse language and strong violence, so anyone who does not like violence and strong language might want to avoid this graphic novel. Now, the REAL REASON why I gave this volume a four star rating is because I felt that the pacing of the story was a bit slow in some places as the characters would spent a good majority of the book talking and not much action happens during these scenes. While I do want good character interactions and this comic definitely has some good character interactions, I also wanted to see more action play up in the story. Final Thoughts: Overall, “Preacher: Gone to Texas” is easily one of the most OFFENSIVE, CRUDE, CONTROVERSIAL yet INTERESTING graphic novels that I had ever read and I would recommend it to fans of Garth Ennis’ works and readers who love reading controversial books! Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  22. 5 out of 5

    [Name Redacted]

    I honestly do not understand why this series was so beloved. I found it dull and derivative, with inferior art-work and unremarkable writing. I tried reading several volumes, but not a one of them reached above a "1 star" rating, and I've long since forgotten which they were. My advice: give this one a pass and move on to something better, like "The Sandman", "Persepolis" or "The Unwritten". UPDATE: Upon reading many of the reviews I think I understand a little better the root of this series' pop I honestly do not understand why this series was so beloved. I found it dull and derivative, with inferior art-work and unremarkable writing. I tried reading several volumes, but not a one of them reached above a "1 star" rating, and I've long since forgotten which they were. My advice: give this one a pass and move on to something better, like "The Sandman", "Persepolis" or "The Unwritten". UPDATE: Upon reading many of the reviews I think I understand a little better the root of this series' popularity. It's got swear words! It's got brutal and unnecessary violence! It's got racist & homophobic epithets! It's got an insultingly-streotypical portrayal of the American South/West/SouthWest that is rivaled only by the Family Guy episode "Boys Do Cry"! It's got insulting portrayals of religion, religious people, and religious figures! Oh how DARING! In short, it's a lazy, crass appeal to the adolescent. It's the sort of thing a High School student would write/draw, believing their ideas to be SO original, but which even small children would recognized as tired, cliched and lowest-common-denominator-approved. Again, if you're looking for a thoughtful examination of the supposed themes (religion, America, etc.), check out "The Sandman", or Michael Moorcock's "Von Bek" stories.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    5.0 to 5.5 stars. Smart, original, very well written and a ton of fun to read. Garth Ennis is a master. Highly recommended!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Preacher and Transmetropolitan: the two adult-theme-heavy comics that sucked me back in, HARD, to my youthful addiction. And both funny, gory and angry to boot. I'm re-reading these - not because in any way do I think there's nothing else good worth reading these days, but simply: they're fun, I enjoyed them immensely the first time around, and dammit, I'm gonna read what passes Sims' "going out the door test" rather than "what are all the cool kids reading right now". Ennis does a helluva job se Preacher and Transmetropolitan: the two adult-theme-heavy comics that sucked me back in, HARD, to my youthful addiction. And both funny, gory and angry to boot. I'm re-reading these - not because in any way do I think there's nothing else good worth reading these days, but simply: they're fun, I enjoyed them immensely the first time around, and dammit, I'm gonna read what passes Sims' "going out the door test" rather than "what are all the cool kids reading right now". Ennis does a helluva job setting up this series - getting a ton of core mythology established early on, dropping hints of things to come without fanfare, and etching some deeply flawed characters in deep, raw lines across the page. Then he adds heaping helpings of foul-mouthed angels, a wrecked freak, supernatural powers and a secret society. Seriously folks, what the fuck is there *not* to like here in the premise? Art's good, Dillon is all about his talents. The surprise in the art is Matt Hollingsworth on colours - not his Hawkeye minimalism, but a rich palette of finishes that complement the pencils immensely. Favourite character of the book: Jesse. No question, he's birthed fully-formed. Favourite moment? Learning what Cassidy's really about.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ayman Gomaa

    From the one who read Sandman \ Saga and many comics with weird stories , this one was also so weird but unlike Sandman and Sage i wasn't fascinated about it , find it okay but not great unlike many of my friends . Maybe i will try it in another time and like it who knows but now i don't think so. قرات كوميكس كثيرة اغرب منها بس غرابة الكوميكس ديه لم تسحرنى , وجدتها غريبة بطريقة مثيرة للشفقة , كان الكاتب تعمد ادخال عناصر كثيرة غريبة للابهار , لا استطيع الحكم من جزء واحد فقط , هى جيدة لكنها ليست From the one who read Sandman \ Saga and many comics with weird stories , this one was also so weird but unlike Sandman and Sage i wasn't fascinated about it , find it okay but not great unlike many of my friends . Maybe i will try it in another time and like it who knows but now i don't think so. قرات كوميكس كثيرة اغرب منها بس غرابة الكوميكس ديه لم تسحرنى , وجدتها غريبة بطريقة مثيرة للشفقة , كان الكاتب تعمد ادخال عناصر كثيرة غريبة للابهار , لا استطيع الحكم من جزء واحد فقط , هى جيدة لكنها ليست مثيرة لدرجة انى ابدا غى قراءة الجزء الثانى منها الان , تستحق التجربة لكن فى وقت اخر

  26. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    Damnit, now I'm into digital graphic novels which I can't afford! Damnit, now I'm into digital graphic novels which I can't afford!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    This is a bit too blasphemous for my taste. I’m not against gore and don’t get offended about anything really but this was something else...

  28. 5 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    I'd have to agree with one of the responses in the letters page that Ennis is never as revolutionary as he seems to imagine himself. Cursing is really an art, and while Ennis is a proficient user, he's really not masterful enough to make it beautiful. He's had to study it with some care and made an admirable transition from Irish to Southern U.S. (which may not seem a drastic change in volume, but is a world apart in vernacular). After reading Morrison's Invisibles, it is a sweet blessing to find I'd have to agree with one of the responses in the letters page that Ennis is never as revolutionary as he seems to imagine himself. Cursing is really an art, and while Ennis is a proficient user, he's really not masterful enough to make it beautiful. He's had to study it with some care and made an admirable transition from Irish to Southern U.S. (which may not seem a drastic change in volume, but is a world apart in vernacular). After reading Morrison's Invisibles, it is a sweet blessing to find someone with a mind for coherent storytelling. Even his flashbacks and cuts seem reasonable and driven. Then again, there is a smidge more action in Preacher, and a lot fewer unrelated tangents. My Suggested Reading In Comics

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    I have read this before but now that is a TV series I wished to see the differences between the too. I was quit surprised they have succeeded in get the dark blasphemous atmosphere of Custer's morbid frame, but Tulip & The Vampire Cassidy. The two devils Tulip is blond bitch but not in TV series, Cassidy is just to tidy but I suspected that if ever made these graphic novels into a TV series they would have to cut the over the top harsh life down. I have read this before but now that is a TV series I wished to see the differences between the too. I was quit surprised they have succeeded in get the dark blasphemous atmosphere of Custer's morbid frame, but Tulip & The Vampire Cassidy. The two devils Tulip is blond bitch but not in TV series, Cassidy is just to tidy but I suspected that if ever made these graphic novels into a TV series they would have to cut the over the top harsh life down.

  30. 5 out of 5

    RG

    Really cool 1st Volume. Weird wacky and gory. I think my watching of the tv show may have ruined the occasional twists and major plot points a little.

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