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Première bande dessinée issue de l'Iran, Persepolis de Marjane Satrapi a été la révélation que l'on sait. La chute du Shah, la révolution islamique et l'exil vécus par une fillette de dix ans, qui choisit vingt ans plus tard la bande dessinée pour livrer son histoire. Première bande dessinée issue de l'Iran, Persepolis de Marjane Satrapi a été la révélation que l'on sait. La chute du Shah, la révolution islamique et l'exil vécus par une fillette de dix ans, qui choisit vingt ans plus tard la bande dessinée pour livrer son histoire.


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Première bande dessinée issue de l'Iran, Persepolis de Marjane Satrapi a été la révélation que l'on sait. La chute du Shah, la révolution islamique et l'exil vécus par une fillette de dix ans, qui choisit vingt ans plus tard la bande dessinée pour livrer son histoire. Première bande dessinée issue de l'Iran, Persepolis de Marjane Satrapi a été la révélation que l'on sait. La chute du Shah, la révolution islamique et l'exil vécus par une fillette de dix ans, qui choisit vingt ans plus tard la bande dessinée pour livrer son histoire.

30 review for Persepolis, Volume 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    I remember when this came out here in Paris and the fantastic wave of publicity it got. And deservedly so. It is a fantastic account of life during the Iranian Revolution and afterwards as Satrapi is a refugee. I happen to have a friend that is also named Marjan who told me that Satrapi's story was almost identical to hers in terms of her feelings of sadness and alienation and loss after leaving Iran and seeing it devolve into a perverted theocracy of terrorism. The entire series is excellent as I remember when this came out here in Paris and the fantastic wave of publicity it got. And deservedly so. It is a fantastic account of life during the Iranian Revolution and afterwards as Satrapi is a refugee. I happen to have a friend that is also named Marjan who told me that Satrapi's story was almost identical to hers in terms of her feelings of sadness and alienation and loss after leaving Iran and seeing it devolve into a perverted theocracy of terrorism. The entire series is excellent as is the animated film that came out based on the book about 5 years ago. A critical testimony to events that I lived as an American watching the hostage situation on TV as a kid. It was fascinating to see through the eyes of someone that was there. And that got away.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Persepolis, Volume 1, Marjane Satrapi Persepolis is a graphic autobiography by Marjane Satrapi that depicts her childhood up to her early adult years in Iran during and after the Islamic Revolution. The title is a reference to the ancient capital of the Persian Empire, Persepolis. Newsweek ranked the book #5 on its list of the ten best non-fiction books of the decade. Originally published in French, it has been translated into several languages including English. French comics publisher L'Associa Persepolis, Volume 1, Marjane Satrapi Persepolis is a graphic autobiography by Marjane Satrapi that depicts her childhood up to her early adult years in Iran during and after the Islamic Revolution. The title is a reference to the ancient capital of the Persian Empire, Persepolis. Newsweek ranked the book #5 on its list of the ten best non-fiction books of the decade. Originally published in French, it has been translated into several languages including English. French comics publisher L'Association published the original work in four volumes between 2000 and 2003. Pantheon Books (North America) and Jonathan Cape (United Kingdom) published the English translations in two volumes – one in 2003 and the other in 2004. Omnibus editions in French and English followed in 2007, coinciding with the theatrical release of the film adaptation. Persepolis 1: The Story of a Childhood (The Veil, The Bicycle, The Water Cell, Persepolis, The Letter, The Party, The Heroes, Moscow, The Sheep, The Trip, The F-14s, The Jewels, The Key, The Wine, The Cigarette, The Passport, Kim Wilde, The Shabbat, The Dowry). تاریخ نخستین خوانش: شانزدهم ماه دسامبر سال 2008 میلادی عنوان: پرسپولیس (داستان مصور) کتاب 1؛ نویسنده: مرجانه ساتراپی (ستراپی)؛ لندن، جاناتان کیپ، 1382، 2003، در 153 ص؛ شابک: 0224064401؛ موضوع: داستانهای فکاهی مصور از هنرمندان ایرانی؛ قرن 21 م پرسپولیس نام کتاب مصوری است که توسط مرجان ساتراپی نوشته شده است. این داستان توسط ایشان و به همت گروهی از فیلمسازان فرانسوی و آمریکایی تبدیل به فیلمی با همین نام گشت که جایزه هیئت داوران جشنواره فیلم کن را به خود اختصاص داد. ا. شربیانی

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    When I bought Persepolis at a yard sale a year ago; it came already signed: (This is the only signed book I own. Also, note how vertical Marjane's signature is.) The book looked brand new but sold for just $.25. Why bother to get a book signed and then sell it for so little without barely having used it? Surely there's a story here that I'll never know. Anyway, at the same yard sale, I also bought this: It's an old board game with a noir style where players work together to solve a crime. It When I bought Persepolis at a yard sale a year ago; it came already signed: (This is the only signed book I own. Also, note how vertical Marjane's signature is.) The book looked brand new but sold for just $.25. Why bother to get a book signed and then sell it for so little without barely having used it? Surely there's a story here that I'll never know. Anyway, at the same yard sale, I also bought this: It's an old board game with a noir style where players work together to solve a crime. It's a cross between Monopoly, Clue and Arkham Horror. It also predates similar cooperative games that I know of by many years. I paid $1 for it. While I browsed their wares, the two ladies running the sale started quoting Monty Python and the Holy Grail, though without the precision of my sisters and I. We chatted a little ('I believe the line is “...average air-speed velocity...”'), I paid the dollar and a quarter and went on my way. As for Persepolis; it's a graphic memoir with basic-yet-quality artwork and a unique style. It regards the struggles of Iranian politics as filtered through the eyes of a child. I didn't finish it last year mostly because I review every book I read and was far behind in this regard (I acknowledge this makes little sense.) As a side-note, I watched the movie-version several years before and recommend it with equal (4-star) enthusiasm. I have no conclusion but to say that this was the most lightly-surreal episode of my life and that feels pretty good.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Read this time for my Graphic Novels class with memoir work by her and Alison Bechdel and Corinne Mucha. This is deceptively good, in that it is a graphic memoir from the perspective of a woman looking back at her life as a young girl during the Iranian Revolution, in 1979. Why deceptive? Because it's in the form of a slightly cartoony comic book that one could mistake for trivial, at a glance. It's not in the least bit trivial. It's interesting to read this during the time of the continuing 201 Read this time for my Graphic Novels class with memoir work by her and Alison Bechdel and Corinne Mucha. This is deceptively good, in that it is a graphic memoir from the perspective of a woman looking back at her life as a young girl during the Iranian Revolution, in 1979. Why deceptive? Because it's in the form of a slightly cartoony comic book that one could mistake for trivial, at a glance. It's not in the least bit trivial. It's interesting to read this during the time of the continuing 2015 Charlie Hebdo story in Paris, where Satrapi now lives. Her liberal and relatively well-off family in Iran did not support the use of the veil, she makes fun of it with her friends in various ways in the book, and now she lives in a city that bans the veil though she does not support that ban. Lots of layers going on here. Complicated, or parts of it are complicated. Maybe all of it is, I don't know. The book was banned by Lane Tech Middle School a few years ago in Chicago for showing images of torture to 7th graders some parents felt were too graphic for that age group. I didn't think those images were very graphic, even for 7th graders, but I also have been working with Sarah Donovan who wrote a dissertation on the importance of teaching genocide literature to middle schoolers, which she does and does amazingly. I do think I would not read Persepolis with my elementary school kids, so I myself have lines I wouldn't yet cross, but on the whole I side against the book censorers in this and most any other case, of course. What makes the book work in spite of some pretty disturbing details from her life is that the style is quite stylized and cartoony, and it's a story told in terms of a little girl, mostly, so it sort of mutes the effect of the fundamentalist siege in a way rather than amplifies it. We see it from her point of view rather than from, say, her mother's point of view. Or her uncle's. But bad things happen to her family and the country, things that the world were aware of through the news at the time, and she specifies these things. It's one story of fundamentalism and fascism that we are still dealing with today and its useful to see her version of it, and useful to see that it is banned in various places while taking what seems to me a fairly uncontroversial perspective on these events.We have history book accounts no one probably knows about in this country at all anymore, so this personal account introduces a new generation to these events. But I can see why (f not justify) the book was and is being banned by some countries/political groups, because it does take a political position that may be unpopular for some, and that's just what people do when they disagree with stuff, they ban it, which is very useful for worldwide book sales, of course. One of my Iranian-American students once told me she hated it because it was so one-sidedly against the Shah. But for me it is still powerful to read. And much different than what Satrapi deals with in what seems to me a less satisfying second volume of her story.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ruel

    A fascinating look at the Islamic Revolution in Iran during the late 70s/early 80s, as seen through the eyes of a young Marjane Satrapi. She's a precocious and inquisitive girl living in a tumultuous time. I loved the black-and-white drawings in this graphic novel; the artwork could be understated and haunting at the same time, from everyday situations at school to graphic images of torture and war. As the new ruling party fundamentalists begin forcing citizens to conform to a more rigid code of A fascinating look at the Islamic Revolution in Iran during the late 70s/early 80s, as seen through the eyes of a young Marjane Satrapi. She's a precocious and inquisitive girl living in a tumultuous time. I loved the black-and-white drawings in this graphic novel; the artwork could be understated and haunting at the same time, from everyday situations at school to graphic images of torture and war. As the new ruling party fundamentalists begin forcing citizens to conform to a more rigid code of dress and behavior, the artwork took on an increasingly introspective tone. Persepolis is a sad coming-of-age story set during much strife and social upheaval. It's a compelling and important read, one that manages to humanize the casualties as well as the survivors of war.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I haven't seen the award-winning animated film by the same name, and my knowledge of Iranian history is somewhat spotty, but I knew that this would not be a light-hearted narrative, and I was right. It's a graphic novel account of Satrapi's childhood in Iran during the Islamic revolution and war with Iraq. She comes of age, wishing to express herself through her clothing choices, music, and words, at the same time that restrictions become the most intense. Set in a backdrop of arrests, execution I haven't seen the award-winning animated film by the same name, and my knowledge of Iranian history is somewhat spotty, but I knew that this would not be a light-hearted narrative, and I was right. It's a graphic novel account of Satrapi's childhood in Iran during the Islamic revolution and war with Iraq. She comes of age, wishing to express herself through her clothing choices, music, and words, at the same time that restrictions become the most intense. Set in a backdrop of arrests, executions, and bombings, it is a grim but important story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ebba

    Wonderful! An excellent portration of the revolution in Iran. It's not a revolution that I know a ton about so it was great to see it from this perspective. This volume was sad but also heart warming at times and Satrapi has a fantastic way of telling her story through comic book form. Personal yet full of important information and very unique. Higly recommend! Wonderful! An excellent portration of the revolution in Iran. It's not a revolution that I know a ton about so it was great to see it from this perspective. This volume was sad but also heart warming at times and Satrapi has a fantastic way of telling her story through comic book form. Personal yet full of important information and very unique. Higly recommend!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Наталія

    Never thought a graphic novel would make me cry but it did.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Annotation: In Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi writes about and illustrates her childhood in 1970s and 80s Iran, between the ages of six and fourteen. Her illustrations are heavy line drawings done in the style of comic strips, and their content details her daily life and family history against a dramatic backdrop of the Shah’s regime, the Islamic Revolution, and the war with Iraq. Marjane herself--ever fiery, sharp, outspoken and determined--serves as the protagonist, while supporting characters he Annotation: In Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi writes about and illustrates her childhood in 1970s and 80s Iran, between the ages of six and fourteen. Her illustrations are heavy line drawings done in the style of comic strips, and their content details her daily life and family history against a dramatic backdrop of the Shah’s regime, the Islamic Revolution, and the war with Iraq. Marjane herself--ever fiery, sharp, outspoken and determined--serves as the protagonist, while supporting characters heavily feature her family, friends, and Tehran neighborhood and school. This installment of Persepolis ends as her parents decide to send teenage Marjane, a rebel and therefore a potential target for the fundamentalists in power, to school in Austria in the hope of a better education and a better future. Analysis: Satrapi skillfully tells two intertwined stories in one--the story of her own coming of age and intellectual and moral awakenings along with the social and political history of her country--and her dramatic black-and-white illustrations vividly capture the juxtaposition of and intersections between the two. Ordinary revelations of growing up arrive hand in hand with atrocities that no child should have to witness or contemplate. Among the former, young Marjane confronts social class in considering the role and life of her family’s young maid and her friend, Mehri. Among the latter, she grapples with the notion of justified murder when her schoolmate brags about how many communists his father has killed and reasons that it is acceptable to kill bad people, or when she learns of the prison torture of her own family members and those of her schoolmates. Sometimes the ordinary and the horrific are depicted in the very same illustration, as when the explosion of young boys in the minefields abuts Marjane’s first experience of a party. Sometimes the horrific follows closely on the heels of the ordinary, as when her shopping trip for punky new clothes and forbidden music ends with the discovery that a bomb has fallen on her neighborhood and the sight of her dead friend’s braceleted arm poking out of the rubble. Here and throughout, the picture is worth more than a thousand words. Young readers, whether or not they have experienced oppression or the horrors of war firsthand, will identify with Marjane, both as a budding rebel and would-be revolutionary and as a normal teen with normal developmental needs. When her parents take advantage of a rare chance to travel with a trip to Turkey, she concerns herself most with what they will buy and bring back for her, and she revels in flouting the Islamist dress code by wearing western clothes and painting her nails. She also sneaks into political protests as a young girl, speaks out fearlessly in class, and rails against hypocrisy wherever she finds it. Readers will feel for her and see themselves in her vacillation between independence and need for her family, culminating in her parents’ decision to send her alone to school in Austria at age fourteen. She feels simultaneously excited and nervous, as any teen would in her position, and she recognizes that her life will never be the same again. Though her parents assure her they will join her soon, she doubts them, tacitly acknowledging that the war and the political situation at home have forced her to grow up early and effectively become an adult. While the text at the story’s close remains emotionally reserved, the final illustration of Marjane’s mother collapsing into her father’s arms after bidding her farewell to Vienna powerfully captures the gravity of the moment and entices readers to follow her into the next installment to find out what awaits in her new life.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nicole aka FromReading2Dreaming

    An updated review can be found in Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood --------------------------------------------- Full review found in The Complete Persepolis An updated review can be found in Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood --------------------------------------------- Full review found in The Complete Persepolis

  11. 5 out of 5

    evelina

    Very interesting to get to know more about Iran!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sleeping with Ghosts

    This kind of stories don't really caught my attention, simply are boring or depressed. Not really interested in waste my time reading it. This kind of stories don't really caught my attention, simply are boring or depressed. Not really interested in waste my time reading it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alexia Lazar

    I can't wait to read the sequel! I can't wait to read the sequel!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I found interesst in this book through the book trailer in class. One thig that impressed me was how the author decided to put a story into a comic book- like theme. This book showed me how even life at it's toughest times come to an end, there is always a bright side to the end of the road. It also shows me that your parents want to do what's best for you, even though you might not agree. "I want to come with you tomorrow" She is a determined girl who fights for what she believes in. Her words s I found interesst in this book through the book trailer in class. One thig that impressed me was how the author decided to put a story into a comic book- like theme. This book showed me how even life at it's toughest times come to an end, there is always a bright side to the end of the road. It also shows me that your parents want to do what's best for you, even though you might not agree. "I want to come with you tomorrow" She is a determined girl who fights for what she believes in. Her words says it all. "For a revolution to succeed,the entire population must support it." She was the odd one out, however she didn't mind. She didnt care enouogh or what others thought. Her actions got her exprelled, leaving the parents only choice to send her t a boarding house filled with nuns. This book has taught me to believe in myself becuase in the end, something will come back to you. Also, your parents arent here to tourture uou, they do what's best. As you grow older, you will further understand but as a kid, ou do not know much and you think you know what's best but really your parents know you more that yu know them so we should all respect them as our parents and label them as #1 becuase they are what made life for you possible.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    I've been meaning to read this book since I bought it at a bookstore in Nice when I was a 15-year-old exchange student. I have a French copy and had started reading it multiple times only to give up quickly. This time I picked it up, determined to get through it, and found it actually both easy to read in terms of a language difficulties as well as content-wise. I've never been a huge fan of graphic novels, but on the other hand there have always been a few I really liked. I'm discovering that t I've been meaning to read this book since I bought it at a bookstore in Nice when I was a 15-year-old exchange student. I have a French copy and had started reading it multiple times only to give up quickly. This time I picked it up, determined to get through it, and found it actually both easy to read in terms of a language difficulties as well as content-wise. I've never been a huge fan of graphic novels, but on the other hand there have always been a few I really liked. I'm discovering that these tend to be about social movements and injustice – for example the Maus books – and Persepolis falls into that category as well. This book was very moving (I almost cried in the last couple pages), and very interesting to read so soon after our US election. References to questionable elections, the motivations of a people who feel overlooked and are undereducated, etc... it's all here. I'm looking forward to reading the second installment but unsure of what I will do after that. Alas, the 15-year-old me only bought the first two volumes.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carmen Claramunt

    This book really opened my eyes up to a new perspective. I think that this should be taught in schools, because it is educational and eye-opening. It’s a wonderful graphic novel with simple, yet detailed and bold drawings. It fully encapsulates the struggle that Iranian women faced, during the Islamic Revolution, and what it was like to grow up one way and suddenly have your life changed drastically, in a powerful way. I think if this had been in written form, rather than as a graphic novel, it This book really opened my eyes up to a new perspective. I think that this should be taught in schools, because it is educational and eye-opening. It’s a wonderful graphic novel with simple, yet detailed and bold drawings. It fully encapsulates the struggle that Iranian women faced, during the Islamic Revolution, and what it was like to grow up one way and suddenly have your life changed drastically, in a powerful way. I think if this had been in written form, rather than as a graphic novel, it would not have been as influential or powerful. Its graphc form allows a more human perspective that immerses readers rather than distancing them because you can actually see what was happening.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Allegra S

    I love graphic novels and learning about history and I feel like this book taught me a lot about what it was like to live through the Islamic Revolution. I was frustrated at times because I felt like I didn't get the full story on a lot of the issues, and that they left things unresolved. Though, I suppose that's the way that things occur in real life! The drawing wasn't particularly my style. I love graphic novels and learning about history and I feel like this book taught me a lot about what it was like to live through the Islamic Revolution. I was frustrated at times because I felt like I didn't get the full story on a lot of the issues, and that they left things unresolved. Though, I suppose that's the way that things occur in real life! The drawing wasn't particularly my style.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Freedman

    This was a terrific book. It's a graphic novel/memoir about a girl growing up during the 1979 Iranian Revolution. The author uses humor to make some really difficult topics (war, revolution, violence, etc.) easier to digest. Anyone who likes graphic novels will probably love this book. (I'm generally not a huge graphic novel fan, and I loved it!) This was a terrific book. It's a graphic novel/memoir about a girl growing up during the 1979 Iranian Revolution. The author uses humor to make some really difficult topics (war, revolution, violence, etc.) easier to digest. Anyone who likes graphic novels will probably love this book. (I'm generally not a huge graphic novel fan, and I loved it!)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gizzard

    Incredibly sad and disturbing, but a great look at history by someone who lived it. The takeover of Iran and the oppression of the women should be a warning to all free women, american and european, that oppression isn't that far away. Incredibly sad and disturbing, but a great look at history by someone who lived it. The takeover of Iran and the oppression of the women should be a warning to all free women, american and european, that oppression isn't that far away.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    A beautifully illustrated, incredibly human story of a girl growing up in Iran during the tumultuous years surrounding 1980. The history and details are fascinating, especially when told through such a personal lens. I read it in two sittings. Now time to read the rest!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    3.5 A really interesting view on the Islamic Revolution. The illustrations were really good! I think I would have liked it better if I used to graphic novels, but this being my first one meant that I had to adjust to the comic like dialogue.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Allan Towns

    I loved this. The illustrations are simple but convey a lot of emotion. The narrative doesn't need over complicated drawing. There is so much in the story itself. I loved this. The illustrations are simple but convey a lot of emotion. The narrative doesn't need over complicated drawing. There is so much in the story itself.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Indrani Sen

    Mindblowing! Outstanding! A memoir. A perspective. A history lesson. And all this in comics form. Superb story-telling and even better illustration. Highly recommending this one.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shirley

    El final

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lila Mullins

    Perception of Persepolis Not being a fan of comics as a youngster, I was skeptical about reading this book for a college assignment. After one minute and one page, I was hooked. Beautifully and simply illustrated, with poignant dialogue that doesn’t miss a beat or waste a word, Satrapi invites us into her secluded but often chaotic and dangerous world of Tehran in the late 1970s-80s. In book 1, we get to know her from age 10 to 14, during the fall of the last Shah of Iran. The history, artistry Perception of Persepolis Not being a fan of comics as a youngster, I was skeptical about reading this book for a college assignment. After one minute and one page, I was hooked. Beautifully and simply illustrated, with poignant dialogue that doesn’t miss a beat or waste a word, Satrapi invites us into her secluded but often chaotic and dangerous world of Tehran in the late 1970s-80s. In book 1, we get to know her from age 10 to 14, during the fall of the last Shah of Iran. The history, artistry and honesty make this book a quick and compelling read that should be part of any school curriculum. What this book provides that we, as an American public may not see or even be taught accurately is a brief and effective history of Tehran. Spoken through the eyes of a child, who grows up amidst the repression and anarchy of the hostile takeover of Islamic extremists, we learn of the many sides to this story. Admittedly, I was one of the many westerners who believed that the entire country of Iran was wholly represented by its overwhelming oppression of women, its fanatical religious beliefs, and the movie Argo. This is far from the truth, and this book has taught me another perspective by literally painting a different picture from what I expected. Starting with the beginning of the book, Satrapi attended a “French, non-religious school” (pg. 4) when the revolutionaries took over the country and forced women to wear veils, because “women’s hair emanates rays that excite men.” (pg. 74) First of all, it surprised me that at some point in history Iranians were allowed freedom of religion and co-ed education. Once Islam took over, the children were still allowed to be educated at the schools of their choosing, just not both genders together. Secondly, I was heartened and deeply touched by those families, like the Satrapi’s, who fought daily and quietly to preserve some semblance of their normal lives. They had parties and served alcohol, purchased rock music and posters (all of which were illegal), and protested in rallies and demonstrations that could have resulted in lawful execution. Finally, I was also surprised that clothing items such as tight jeans and nail polish were even attainable in stores, since those items were contraband. This was one of many hypocritical rules that the regime imposed; the items were not illegal to purchase, just to own, and as such could not be brought into the country either. What really hit home from reading this book was how people learn to adapt to horrific situations as best they can, which allows them to tolerate such atrocities as being the “new normal”. Holocaust, anyone? If written in textbook format with the occasional picture or two, Persepolis may not have had the impact it did on society with its simple imagery, the stark contrast of black and white, and the no-holds-barred dialogue. The comic book layout allowed the readers to see frame by frame a brilliant story that wasted not a word or an image. Indeed, some of the most powerful cells had very few details and little to no words, and the lack of color proved to be less distracting and perhaps less painful to witness when a disturbing act was taking place. For example (spoiler alert!), when Satrapi’s uncle is in prison for his beliefs (pg. 69), He cradles her and says to her only four words: “star of my life”. When read in context, this moment gave me chills and uncontrollable tears. Oftentimes it would only take a small movement of an eyebrow or a likeness of fire to set the tone. Several other frames throughout the book had this magnitude of shock as well, especially when portraying death and anger. The dialogue as well didn’t miss a beat, and not for one frame did any of the text detract or slow the momentum of the story. One particular set of frames on page 145 significantly sticks out in my mind as a prime example of the simplicity of the situation, and how a larger explanation would have lessened the impact of the message. In six frames, the cells contain only two people, Satrapi and her mother. Her mother is explaining to her in frank and frightening terms what happens when a virgin is sentenced to die. With each frame, there is a change of movement, as mother shakes daughter to emphasize each word, and no more than two brief sentences per frame. I ended up reading this page twice just to be able to wrap my head around the information, and was sucked into the page to the point that I could feel the shaking of the author’s mother, and the fright. Satrapi writes frankly and honestly, without apology. As she grows up, so does her concept of the world and her ability to understand and articulate, which helps us as readers have more compassion when she makes mistakes. The story is written in simple vernacular, which spans from childhood to young adulthood that is both endearing and troubling. The details have such verisimilitude that as readers we get drawn into the horror of the Islamic extremists as if we were experiencing every action personally. The rebellion, miscalculations, and naiveté that Satrapi experiences could easily be the experiences of any one of her readers. She is a young girl, learning the joys and limitations of her own power within her tyrannical government. A great example of this spans from pages 131-134, when twelve year old Satrapi ventures out on her own to purchase some rock music, a contraband item. She is wearing a denim jacket, sneakers, and a Michael Jackson button, also contraband articles. What ensued from this direct violation of the regime has her running home in tears, and yet will not tell her mother the truth for fear that she might not be allowed out on her own again. I am sure we all have those childhood stories of defiance in which consequences we could have suffered greatly yet are still willing to take such a risk! To recapitulate, this is a worthwhile tale that has garnered so much attention that sequels and a movie have been produces from its popularity. The messages and the background of this story serve as an insight and an eye opener; a glance through the keyhole of a door into another world, and may just change your mind and even the way you view your own life.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    What was the title of the book? Persepolis Who was the author of the book? Marjane Satrapi What genre was the book? Graphic Novel/Biography Who were the main characters in the book? Marjane and her family What was the main conflict in the book? Marjane’s country is on the brink of war with another country Give a brief summary of the book you completed. Be sure to include the beginning, climax and resolution from the book (if applicable). Marjane believed she was a prophet as a child but when her uncle What was the title of the book? Persepolis Who was the author of the book? Marjane Satrapi What genre was the book? Graphic Novel/Biography Who were the main characters in the book? Marjane and her family What was the main conflict in the book? Marjane’s country is on the brink of war with another country Give a brief summary of the book you completed. Be sure to include the beginning, climax and resolution from the book (if applicable). Marjane believed she was a prophet as a child but when her uncle gets executed for being a spy she stops believing in god and doesn’t believe she’s a child prophet no more. Fast forward to her teen years Her country's on the brink of war with another country.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cooper

    Marjane Satrapi’s book Persepolis crushes many stereotypes of the Middle East and opens the world’s perspective to what life is really like in Iran. Unfortunately, many Westerners accept the “false truth” painted by the media that Iran is only desert, extremists, patriarchy, and terrorism. Satrapi allows readers to escape these single minded assumptions and learn what life is really like in Iran alongside the story’s protagonist, Marji. Persepolis is a coming of age story, which is brilliant bec Marjane Satrapi’s book Persepolis crushes many stereotypes of the Middle East and opens the world’s perspective to what life is really like in Iran. Unfortunately, many Westerners accept the “false truth” painted by the media that Iran is only desert, extremists, patriarchy, and terrorism. Satrapi allows readers to escape these single minded assumptions and learn what life is really like in Iran alongside the story’s protagonist, Marji. Persepolis is a coming of age story, which is brilliant because a child’s perspective is one that everyone around the world has universally experienced and can understand. If one is uneducated about the Middle East, they’re in the same childish position as Marji, and as she matures through the story, the reader’s understanding of Iran grows as well. I tend to consider myself rather open minded and I try not to blindly accept things I am told. With that said, Persepolis provided me with a startling reality check when I realized that the Middle East has large modern cities and not only small desert villages. While this may seem obvious to most, it was, sadly, eye opening to me, for I realized that had fallen victim to the “false truths” of the media. Amazingly, the panel that made my ignorance clear to me was the top panel on page 136 in which a city is being destroyed by missiles. While I was reading I came to this panel and in my closed mindedness, my first thought was, “What an interesting choice to depict New York during the horrifying 9/11 attacks while talking about the Middle East.” I must shamefully admit that my mind took a simple panel of a city skyline under attack and associated it with the Middle East and therefore terrorism. I am not racist and am aware most of the people in the Middle East are not terrorists, but my experience proves Satrapi’s reason for writing this book: To show that a nation should not be judged only by the wrongdoings of the few. I was extremely closed minded without even realizing it, but Satrapi revealed my blindness and gave me the opportunity to change as I’m sure she does for everyone who reads this story. I recommend this book for college and upper-grade high school students because they are educated enough to see the depth of this story in the simplicity of its illustrations and writing. Persepolis’ text is efficient and its illustrations clean; both share deep, powerful messages without containing distracting information to take away from their purpose. Satrapi’s use of details is unique; instead of going into extreme detail she simplifies the surrounding objects to highlight the important sections of the panel. My favorite examples of this are the two panels on page 102: In one panel, young boys are being blown up in war crossing mine fields while in the second Marji is dancing at a party. These two panels show how Satrapi compares and contrasts panels to show details. The horrifying war scene is simply streaks of light and silhouettes which by itself seems fairly plain. The only minor details in it are the outlines of the “keys to Heaven” around the boy’s necks. The party scene contrasts with this by having clear details such as facial expressions, obvious clothing, and a detailed neckless of nails around Marji’s neck. Another subtle detail, that is actually present in both panels, is the positions of the young boys at war being mirrored by the dancers at the party. Doing this connects the two panels and further highlights the outlined keys in the war panel because of the detail in the nails of Marji’s necklace in the party panel. By connecting the two panels through similarities, Satrapi is able to emphasize plain outlines in the war panel by adding detail to their counterparts in the party seen. Because Satrapi’s panels connect to each other they are able to add depth and importance to one another; this is just one way Satrapi utilizes the idea of “a picture is worth a thousand words.” When she can convey meaning with an illustration instead of text she does so which allows her to condense her ideas into a rather short, yet very interesting and powerful, book. Furthermore, Satrapi’s book educates readers about the Islamic Revolution of 1979 and just how totalitarian the Government in Iran was during the time. Readers discover that many items and activities such as partying, drinking alcohol, playing cards or chess, watching movies, listening to music, or reading magazines were in fact illegal. Rules were also put in place dictating how to properly dress so as to not arouse the opposite sex: Men were banned from wearing short sleeves and women were forced to wear veils to cover their hair. Women who supported the Regime wore full body veils that covered their feminine form completely, whereas women who opposed the Regime wore less concealing veils and let several strands of hair show. Satrapi shows that women were active in fighting for their rights and points out that Iran was already a split nation before is was attacked by Iraq. She shows just how complicated and dangerous life was growing up in Iran during the late 1900s, but also explains the rich history of the nation and why so many people were willing to endanger their lives to fight for the homeland they love. In conclusion, Persepolis offers a rarely heard perspective of the Middle East in a simple, efficient and highly educational medium. People from around the world can learn from Satrapi’s story but I believe Westerners will benefit most from the unique perspective. Persepolis is a quick yet interesting read packed full of creative illustrations, and I would highly recommend reading it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marypi

    This is a fantastic account of life during the Iranian Revolution. The before and after in the life a girl who lived and breathed the deaths, persecutions and imprisonments of many of the people she knew. Since the story starts when she's 10 years old, you can actually notice the naivety of the retelling, just like a 10 year old would tell it. Later, as she grows up, the story becomes more obscure, since she's starting to notice a lot more stuff. It really is a great story. I thought it would be This is a fantastic account of life during the Iranian Revolution. The before and after in the life a girl who lived and breathed the deaths, persecutions and imprisonments of many of the people she knew. Since the story starts when she's 10 years old, you can actually notice the naivety of the retelling, just like a 10 year old would tell it. Later, as she grows up, the story becomes more obscure, since she's starting to notice a lot more stuff. It really is a great story. I thought it would be hard to read (since I'm not into the graphic novel genre), but I loved the black-and-white drawings.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daniela Sylmae

    I love the way the different points of view are explored, from the author as an adult to her as a child. I also learned quite a bit from reading this, since I admit I know very little of the wars and struggles of the Middle East. The style reminds me very much of Maus in which the topic is heavy and yet well explored. It makes me feel encouraged to keep educating myself on what I don’t know.

  30. 5 out of 5

    catherine

    great storytelling, it gives enough details about the cultural context without being too much, and very touching. i want to read the rest now!

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