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Kate Bush and Hounds of Love. Ashgate Popular and Folk Music Series.

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The main body of this book consists of a linear track-by-track musical analysis of Kate Bush's albums released between 1978 and 2005. In particular, it pays close attention to the 1985 album Hounds of Love, which forms the centrepiece of the author's musical analysis. The main body of this book consists of a linear track-by-track musical analysis of Kate Bush's albums released between 1978 and 2005. In particular, it pays close attention to the 1985 album Hounds of Love, which forms the centrepiece of the author's musical analysis.


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The main body of this book consists of a linear track-by-track musical analysis of Kate Bush's albums released between 1978 and 2005. In particular, it pays close attention to the 1985 album Hounds of Love, which forms the centrepiece of the author's musical analysis. The main body of this book consists of a linear track-by-track musical analysis of Kate Bush's albums released between 1978 and 2005. In particular, it pays close attention to the 1985 album Hounds of Love, which forms the centrepiece of the author's musical analysis.

32 review for Kate Bush and Hounds of Love. Ashgate Popular and Folk Music Series.

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    "Music is a slippery beast. It seduces us into thinking that the sounds themselves are what is being scrutinized, whereas, to an extent, it is ourselves that we study, articulated by this most nebulous of sign systems." This is a sentence towards the end of this fascinating study by Ron Moy of the 'oeuvre' of Kate Bush. 'Oeuvre' is one of Moy's favourite words alongside the totally alien word, to me at least, of 'melisma'. He used these words on innumerable occasions and so long as I could ignore "Music is a slippery beast. It seduces us into thinking that the sounds themselves are what is being scrutinized, whereas, to an extent, it is ourselves that we study, articulated by this most nebulous of sign systems." This is a sentence towards the end of this fascinating study by Ron Moy of the 'oeuvre' of Kate Bush. 'Oeuvre' is one of Moy's favourite words alongside the totally alien word, to me at least, of 'melisma'. He used these words on innumerable occasions and so long as I could ignore the infuriating repetition of them i could thoroughly enjoy this study rather like that appallingly dreadful continuity announcer on radio 4 called Neil something-or-other who ruins my Sunday by his incredibly annoying voice. And that is the point. It is all terribly subjective. Neil, radio 4 man, drives me to distraction, others adore him i am sure, Moy recognizes the subjectivity of everything he writes and for that reason i loved this examination. He encourages his reader to reflect and argue with him. I love, have always loved, will always love, everything about Kate Bush ('50 Words for snow' excepted becasue that is unadulterated crap) but Moy wants you to think. He is a clinician examining and dissecting the work of Bush and he challenges his readers to argue; to "mark out our relationship...indicating that I am a fan not a fanatic without the ability to discriminate". His main cri de coeur appears to be 'in our interpretations we actually reveal ourselves, filtered through the medium of the work under scrutiny and I like that. This book enables me to return to the albums of Kate Bush once again with yet another layer of possibility. She is one of the driving forces of my musicality, if I have one, and this book suggests to me that anything I see in her work, anything which i draw from her music ....that is perfectly acceptable. And for that, for that freedom and affirmation i say to Ron Moy...good on you. Kate Bush is a powerhouse of inspiration and sexuality but she presents it in such a way which invites interpretation rather than imposes cetainty. I have always found this woman unbearably attractive and profoundly beyond my understanding. Listen to 'The Ninth Wave' and I defy anyone to arrogantly claim to have grasped the essence of Kate Bush. Moy, very wisely, seeks to shed a certain amount of light upon her creativity but does not try to 'fullstop the sentence'. He has a great line in humourous dismissive comments which only serve to emphasize his acknowledgement of her skill when it is there. Of the video that goes with 'The Dreaming' "Her appearance in a water-cooled 'moonsuit' complete with 1980's big hair and trowel loads of make up and lipstick seems seriously ill-advised if the intention is for the message to remain more important than the medium"..miaow or again "Draws us into an over-literal representation of 'Eat the Music' complete with smiling, exotic ethnics from some kind of commercial for mango smoothies" . Not the most politically correct critique i have ever read I grant you but one gets his point. Of one admittedly weird song he says "If ever a track cries out experimental track best left as a b side then 'Big stripey lie' fits the bill" and then this is perhaps my favourite of his damning with extraordinarily faint praise "Rolf Harris's sung verse demonstrates that imprecise pitching does not invariably prove an obstacle in the world of pop" Ouch, so very ouch !! Having said all that, i loved Moy's serious approach and analysis of her work and he prefaces all his comments or rather all his comments are underpinned by this great sentence '"Perhaps, as with much incomprehension about meaning, the fault lies with the reader rather than the text" To return to my first thought, I love Kate Bush, I find her inspiring , moving and challenging but, in all the albums, she evades my pinning her down, rather like a butterfly which you couldn't and indeed probably wouldn't want to capture. Her full meaning escapes me. What she intends, or means or infers I can only guess at and that is why, since I first was swept away by 'Wuthering Heights' and especially by 'The Man with the child in his eyes' in 1978, this woman has enthralled me and remained a gloriously yearned for enigma and why, as Moy states early on in his book "It is one of the reasons why I have never seen the meaning of a text as residing solely, or even chiefly, within the lyrical narrative" This book takes me, if you will, through another entrance into the cavernous expanse of her imagination and skill not because Moy has gained any private interviews with the woman but because he has shared his insights. Fascinating and profound; some, along with which I nod wisely, some towards which I raise eyebrows in surprised admiration and some from which my mouth falls open in a 'what the f**k are you talking about' type way. Brilliant book purely because I encounter another fan's theories and that is always fun especially when that fan is intelligent, articulate and generous.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    The first part of this book, discussing Kate's first four albums, was great, though I disagree with some of the author's conclusions (Sat in Your Lap not commercial?). The Hounds of Love section is okay but not as interesting, as it starts to wander into navel-gazing territory. Then it all basically falls apart with entire sections devoted to the author whining about "North American hegemony" in English, seemingly unaware that hegemony does not mean what he thinks it means (nor does reductive #l The first part of this book, discussing Kate's first four albums, was great, though I disagree with some of the author's conclusions (Sat in Your Lap not commercial?). The Hounds of Love section is okay but not as interesting, as it starts to wander into navel-gazing territory. Then it all basically falls apart with entire sections devoted to the author whining about "North American hegemony" in English, seemingly unaware that hegemony does not mean what he thinks it means (nor does reductive #lookitup). It provides some interesting insights on Kate's discography, but most of those come from Kate Bush: The Biography, so I expect that would be a more interesting book. (I only read this one because it was free on my university's e-library and I needed something to occupy my time.) If the book had been devoted to any sort of in-depth musicological/textual exploration of Kate's work, it would have been fine. If it had been a more personal story of the author's experience of her work, it would have been great. But as it is, trying to straddle the two along with general scholarly babble and hand-wringing about those damn Americans, it's a bit crap, really. I was skipping entire sections by the end because I knew they'd just annoy me. Despite trying to talk about feminism as it applies to Kate's work, the author clearly only has a rudimentary understanding of it, to the point that I finally wrote an annotation in my copy saying "Kate doesn't understand feminism and neither do you" along with several more profane ones in all caps. Cf. his attempts at analyzing the music from a linguistic standpoint, mainly in terms of phonology. Those attempts really irritated me as a sociolinguist, because if he had worked with an actual linguist on them, it would not only have been more accurate but possibly even interesting Bottom line: Kate fans have little to nothing to gain here. I also can't see how it would be helpful to music scholars either, so it's puzzling that it was put out as an academic work. In short, it's not the worst book I've read, but there's really no reason for it to exist.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Andy

  4. 5 out of 5

    CrimsonCrow

  5. 4 out of 5

    Karin karinto

  6. 5 out of 5

    Antonello Saeli

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tommy Harmon

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dan Shea

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brad

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ilse

  11. 5 out of 5

    Allie

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jayne Lamb

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jan Voya

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amber

  16. 4 out of 5

    RoseAdagio

  17. 5 out of 5

    Spider the Doof Warrior

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie *Eff your feelings*

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rich

  20. 4 out of 5

    Xklm

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn Roxie

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kevin O'Brien

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sharron

  25. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Cutler-Broyles

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Simon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Murnau’s stolen skull

  28. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Lawrence

  30. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  31. 4 out of 5

    Bernard Francis

  32. 5 out of 5

    Shane Longoria

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