web site hit counter Aladdin and the Magic Lamp - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Aladdin and the Magic Lamp

Availability: Ready to download

This work has been previously published and carefully edited by humans to be read digitally on your ereader. Please enjoy this historical and classic work. All of our titles are only 99 cents and are formatted to work with the Nook. Also if it is an illustrated work you will be able to see the original images.


Compare

This work has been previously published and carefully edited by humans to be read digitally on your ereader. Please enjoy this historical and classic work. All of our titles are only 99 cents and are formatted to work with the Nook. Also if it is an illustrated work you will be able to see the original images.

30 review for Aladdin and the Magic Lamp

  1. 4 out of 5

    ☆Ruth☆

    A fairly standard retelling of the classic fairy-tale but still enjoyable even at my advanced years! A great story for kids :).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Susannah

    I really like the story of Aladdin, however, I did not really like this adaptation much. I know it is by a renowned children's author, Philip Pullman, but it was just kind of odd. He says in the author's note that you should not adapt a known story unless you can bring something of your own to it, but the changes he made were strange. First of all there are two genie for no reason. One pops out of a ring before the one from the lamp even appears, which lessens the impact of the genie of the lamp I really like the story of Aladdin, however, I did not really like this adaptation much. I know it is by a renowned children's author, Philip Pullman, but it was just kind of odd. He says in the author's note that you should not adapt a known story unless you can bring something of your own to it, but the changes he made were strange. First of all there are two genie for no reason. One pops out of a ring before the one from the lamp even appears, which lessens the impact of the genie of the lamp's arrival. Aladdin himself is a bit of a git. It is hard to be on his side, even though he does improve throughout the tale. Also, Pullman says it was an Arabian tale, but set in China to seem more exotic to the listener's of the story. But all the names and customs are Arabic, with place names given as Chinese. It is quite disorienting. The illustrations are great though. I love that silhouette-style.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    This is an old translation of the Alaeddin story. It uses biblical language with these and throus in it. There is racism and assumptions of people that aren't popular anymore. Still once I got past some of that's the story was interesting. Lots of footnotes so how faithful a translation it is I can't tell but maybe it was well researched. This is an old translation of the Alaeddin story. It uses biblical language with these and throus in it. There is racism and assumptions of people that aren't popular anymore. Still once I got past some of that's the story was interesting. Lots of footnotes so how faithful a translation it is I can't tell but maybe it was well researched.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Britney Padilla

    Grades 3-5. Motif- jinnee. In this version of the tale, which is set in China, Aladdin is portrayed as a lazy troublemaker. He was such a troublemaker that his father died of worry. Aladdin and his mother were barely surviving only because she would spin cotton and sell it so they could eat. One day while Aladdin was out, a stranger claiming to be his uncle asked him to accompany him to a “garden of wonder.” When they arrive, he tells Aladdin to retrieve the lamp and not to touch anything else. Al Grades 3-5. Motif- jinnee. In this version of the tale, which is set in China, Aladdin is portrayed as a lazy troublemaker. He was such a troublemaker that his father died of worry. Aladdin and his mother were barely surviving only because she would spin cotton and sell it so they could eat. One day while Aladdin was out, a stranger claiming to be his uncle asked him to accompany him to a “garden of wonder.” When they arrive, he tells Aladdin to retrieve the lamp and not to touch anything else. Aladdin brings back the lamp but asks to be helped out of the garden first. The man turned out to be an evil sorcerer known as the Moor and was enraged that Aladdin did not give him the lamp so he closed up the entrance to the garden and left Aladdin for dead. While in the garden Aladdin had found an iron ring that claimed to be able to help him. In desperation, he rubbed the ring and a dark jinnee came out and commanded him to be set free from the garden. He then returned home and rubbed the lamp and another jinnie came out and Aladdin commanded that he bring food. Later, Aladdin sees the princess and falls in love at first sight. He sends his mother to the sultan with a gold plate of jewels to ask for her hand. The sultan’s royal vizier challenges him and says they would consider the proposal if Aladdin brought forty slaves with a plate of jewels each. He then went to rub the lamp and his command was once again granted. The sultan then said that he could marry his daughter if he could build her a suitable palace. The next day a palace appears and the princess falls in love with Aladdin at first sight. Meanwhile, the Moor still wanted the lamp and he uses magic and sees that Aladdin was still alive and married to the princess. The Moor returns to China and gets a hold of the lamp. He uses it to tear away the palace from China with the princess inside and gets it taken back to his garden in Morocco. The Sultan gives Aladdin twenty-four hours to save the princess so he uses his ring and is taken to Morocco by the jinnee of the ring. In the end he saves the princess and his greed goes unnoticed. Aladdin’s portrayal of a lazy troublemaker getting the girl and all the riches is not a good message to give to children. He did not earn any of it. His only act of heroism was when he actually made the effort to save the princess. This was quickly shattered when he decided to cut off the Moor’s head who was already down from drinking sleeping herbs. A strength of this book was that the author kept the tales original setting. It was strange thought that although he kept this location, the images were clearly not in China. The illustrations were done in layering of chalk pastels. The main colors used in the illustrations were all earthy tones. Violets and reds were used for the villains, greens were used for Aladdin and his mother, and bright oranges were used for the sultan, and the slaves. This book was more text than illustrations. I would not recommend this book. The setting and illustrations do not match and I did not like how Aladdin’s greed went unnoticed. He was also very disrespectful to his mother and his mother was weak because she let him get away with being a troublemaker before he even had the lamp. Furthermore, Aladdin never made wishes he made commands and the commands were not limited.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    Being Pantomime season, I thought it was the ideal time to check out this audiobook. It was really short, so it didn't take long to listen to it. Of course, the basic story was familiar. I can't honestly say that Pullman's re-telling added anything terribly original. Also, it felt strange that this version was set in China, yet Aladdin's father was called Mustapha. Not a very Chinese name, in my limited experience. Being Pantomime season, I thought it was the ideal time to check out this audiobook. It was really short, so it didn't take long to listen to it. Of course, the basic story was familiar. I can't honestly say that Pullman's re-telling added anything terribly original. Also, it felt strange that this version was set in China, yet Aladdin's father was called Mustapha. Not a very Chinese name, in my limited experience.

  6. 4 out of 5

    DW

    It was fine. It was truer to Arabian Nights than Disney and on audiobook to listen to with a young kid. Some cultural things to explain to the kid as we listened but still mostly what I was hoping for. I got tired of all of Disney's interpretations. Also a good way to explain to a young person how a story can be told many different ways. It was fine. It was truer to Arabian Nights than Disney and on audiobook to listen to with a young kid. Some cultural things to explain to the kid as we listened but still mostly what I was hoping for. I got tired of all of Disney's interpretations. Also a good way to explain to a young person how a story can be told many different ways.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Translation ruined it for me I was really interested in reading the original story of Aladdin, but this was not a good translation for me. It kept the story in biblical type wording and had pages on pages of footnotes (literally at least every other line had a footnote included which became extremely distracting. The antisemitism, though understood and not unexpected added to less excitement in general. Not sure of the purpose of the preceding story-if this was a compilation and not just supposed Translation ruined it for me I was really interested in reading the original story of Aladdin, but this was not a good translation for me. It kept the story in biblical type wording and had pages on pages of footnotes (literally at least every other line had a footnote included which became extremely distracting. The antisemitism, though understood and not unexpected added to less excitement in general. Not sure of the purpose of the preceding story-if this was a compilation and not just supposed to be Aladdin and the enchanted lamp, it would make more sense.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alfred Smith

    It's ok The stories were fine but a lot of the book was more for scholars and language masters than for me. The introduction and footnotes took up a major portion. Thus the tepid rating. It's ok The stories were fine but a lot of the book was more for scholars and language masters than for me. The introduction and footnotes took up a major portion. Thus the tepid rating.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I love Philip Pullman’s alternative fairy tales.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Poe

    Aladdin and the Enchanted Lamp Genre: Traditional literature- Fairy Tale Awards: No awards listed Audience: 2nd- 6th In Aladdin and the Enchanted Lamp the main characters are Alladin, the Moor, Aladdin’s mother, Princess Badr-al-Budur, Fatima, and the jinnee. Aladdin is described as a mischievous street boy that causes problems in the town. Aladdin’s mother is described as kind and nurturing while the Moor is described as a liar and a sorcerer. The women are described as beautiful. The readers kno Aladdin and the Enchanted Lamp Genre: Traditional literature- Fairy Tale Awards: No awards listed Audience: 2nd- 6th In Aladdin and the Enchanted Lamp the main characters are Alladin, the Moor, Aladdin’s mother, Princess Badr-al-Budur, Fatima, and the jinnee. Aladdin is described as a mischievous street boy that causes problems in the town. Aladdin’s mother is described as kind and nurturing while the Moor is described as a liar and a sorcerer. The women are described as beautiful. The readers know the most about Aladdin and the Moor because they are the two main characters. I am familiar with the Disney version of Aladdin. It is different. The Disney version has Princess Jasmine and Abu. The Disney version is also less violent. This version takes place in real countries like Morocco and China while the Disney version takes place in a made up place called Agraba. As a teacher I would use this story for upper Elementary. I think that it is too violent for younger children. This book is a good story with good character development. I would use this as a group read aloud to teach my students about fairy tales.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Drew Graham

    In ancient China there lived a lazy boy named Aladdin. His tailor father having died some years before, Aladdin and his mother scraped by to survive, until one day a Moor arrived claiming to be the long-lost brother of their dead father and husband. The Moor, unbeknownst to Aladdin, had foreseen that he needed the layabout youth to retrieve a marvelous lamp from an underground cavern in the desert. After Aladdin becomes trapped, lamp in hand, the Moor leaves furious and Aladdin struggles to esca In ancient China there lived a lazy boy named Aladdin. His tailor father having died some years before, Aladdin and his mother scraped by to survive, until one day a Moor arrived claiming to be the long-lost brother of their dead father and husband. The Moor, unbeknownst to Aladdin, had foreseen that he needed the layabout youth to retrieve a marvelous lamp from an underground cavern in the desert. After Aladdin becomes trapped, lamp in hand, the Moor leaves furious and Aladdin struggles to escape. Before long, Aladdin encounters a powerful jinnee who helps him make his way home, and starts him on a journey to prestige, riches and love. I'm not a huge fan of Philip Pullman, but when I reached Aladdin in my Disney source material read-through, I wanted to read a couple different versions and his looked visually appealing, so there you go. As far as the text goes, it followed the other version I read pretty closely, but it also strayed a little bit (but just a little). It's funny because in the foreword he goes on about how you shouldn't tell a familiar story unless you have some way to make it new and interesting, and then he himself does very little to make this familiar story new and interesting. Anyway, it did diminish the distracting plot line of the vizier and his betrothed-to-the-princess son, and in a few other ways streamlined the storytelling a little so it flowed a little better. I liked the soft illustration style, and again there were a lot of great colors and exotic details, but for making such a fuss about the original story being Chinese, it still felt pretty specifically Arabian. The love story isn't very convincing, and princess Badr-al-Budur's role is still pretty minimal, but the ending was pretty tidy. I'm still a little surprised at the lack of personality in the jinnee (must we?... why not just genie like a normal person?), but that's probably just because every genie is compared to the big blue one famously featured in Disney's version. Again, Disney's finished treatment of this story is significantly different, but I think it works, and apparently the story of Aladdin is SO old that no one really knows its source or origin, so why not take a few liberties when developing it for a new audience and medium? It's basically Cinderella with a twist. I guess I just haven't found the perfect version of the "original" Aladdin story. I mean, this was a pretty edition, and I do like the basic story, but the writing just seemed a little pretentious and the illustrations a little out of the purported setting. Still, it was a fun and quick and exotic read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Katie Lambrix

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Genre: Classic Folk Tale Summary Blurb(s): The original story of Aladdin is a Middle-Eastern folk tale. It concerns an impoverished young ne'er-do-well named Aladdin, in a Chinese city, who is recruited by a sorcerer from the Maghreb, who passes himself off as the brother of Aladdin's late father, convincing Aladdin and his mother of his goodwill by apparently making arrangements to set up the lad as a wealthy merchant. His real motive is to persuade young Aladdin to retrieve a wonderful oil lamp fro Genre: Classic Folk Tale Summary Blurb(s): The original story of Aladdin is a Middle-Eastern folk tale. It concerns an impoverished young ne'er-do-well named Aladdin, in a Chinese city, who is recruited by a sorcerer from the Maghreb, who passes himself off as the brother of Aladdin's late father, convincing Aladdin and his mother of his goodwill by apparently making arrangements to set up the lad as a wealthy merchant. His real motive is to persuade young Aladdin to retrieve a wonderful oil lamp from a booby-trapped magic cave. After the sorcerer attempts to double-cross him, Aladdin finds himself trapped in the cave. Fortunately, Aladdin retains a magic ring lent to him by the sorcerer. When he rubs his hands in despair, he inadvertently rubs the ring, and a djinni appears, who takes him home to his mother. Aladdin is still carrying the lamp, and when his mother tries to clean it, a second, far more powerful djinni appears, who is bound to do the bidding of the person holding the lamp. With the aid of the djinni of the lamp, Aladdin becomes rich and powerful and marries Princess Badroulbadour, the Emperor's daughter. The djinni builds Aladdin a wonderful palace - far more magnificent than that of the Emperor himself. The sorcerer's more powerful and evil brother tries to destroy Aladdin for killing his brother by disguising himself as an old woman known for her healing powers. Badroulbadour falls for his disguise, and commands the "woman" to stay in her palace in case of any ilnesses. Aladdin is warned of his danger by the djinni of the lamp and slays the imposter. Everyone lives happily ever after, Aladdin eventually suceeding to his father-in-law's throne. Interesting Quotes: --- Other Thoughts: I initially chose to read this story because I am familiar with the plot for the Disney movie and wanted to compare and... wow. While I expected it to be different, I wasn't quite expecting it to be so drastically different in so many ways. Putting the plot differences aside, I was mostly struck by the difference in the character of the princess. In the version I know, she is portrayed as more independent, and looking for love not just someone to marry... in the book, exactly the opposite. She falls madly in love with him only because he is rich. I'm not taking this as a complaint, considering the time when this was written, this was probably a very typical portrayal of women... it just really took me by surprise. I was not expecting it to be nearly as far from the story that I know.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rishi De La Fuente

    When I began reading the story I was surprised to realise that it was being told in China rather than in Arabia. I had been used to since my childhood the Disney movie version of Aladdin being set in Arabia so it was a little strange for me reading the story with its setting in China. Unlike in the Disney version where he is an orphan, Aladdin has both a mother and father in which he is very spoilt and prefers to play instead of learning a trade with his father. His father as a result dies from When I began reading the story I was surprised to realise that it was being told in China rather than in Arabia. I had been used to since my childhood the Disney movie version of Aladdin being set in Arabia so it was a little strange for me reading the story with its setting in China. Unlike in the Disney version where he is an orphan, Aladdin has both a mother and father in which he is very spoilt and prefers to play instead of learning a trade with his father. His father as a result dies from shame and his mother has to learn to weave in order to survive due to Aladdin's reluctance to take up a trade. There is a quest in this version for a magic lamp however unlike the Disney version where the genie grants only three wishes to Aladdin, in this version the genie has no limits on the number of wishes he can grant. There is also a love interest involving a princess and an evil rival who is also after the lamp due to the wishes the jinnee can grant. In the story the Jinnee appear to not seem to forge relationships with their lamp owners compared to the Disney film where the Genie becomes really close to Aladdin. What also makes this story even more intriguing is that despite being set in China there still seems to be a sense of Arabic folklore involved due to the usage of the two jinn that are in the story. Jinn are significant in Arabic folklore tales and also exist in Islam and it is fascinating to see the contrasts between the Jinn of the ring given to him by the magician and the Jinn of the lamp. Overall it was a refreshing read, very different to the Aladdin I knew growing up. I believe for KS1/2 children it would be a good read as it would show them who the original Aladdin actually as we often get too attached to Disney which can distort the original tale which is evident here as this tale predates the Disney version.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chak

    Since our son hated fiction when he was little, we're trying to catch him up on classic myths and tales now that he's older and can tolerate fantasy. We read this book for our alternate family reading time this month (we use one weekend night to deviate from the bedtime reading series we normally read during the week, which is currently The Sisters Grimm series by Michael Buckley). Philip Pullman (of His Dark Materials fame) adapts the Aladdin tale with colorful details and suspense. My husband Since our son hated fiction when he was little, we're trying to catch him up on classic myths and tales now that he's older and can tolerate fantasy. We read this book for our alternate family reading time this month (we use one weekend night to deviate from the bedtime reading series we normally read during the week, which is currently The Sisters Grimm series by Michael Buckley). Philip Pullman (of His Dark Materials fame) adapts the Aladdin tale with colorful details and suspense. My husband described it as being told in a Harry Potter-esque manner, where it's easy to relate to the characters, there is a clear delineation between good and bad and everything gets wrapped up in the end. I enjoyed Pullman's Aladdin better than the story I originally heard (which was much shorter and not as detailed). The setting was funny to me, since the story is supposed to take place in China, but all of the cultural references are Middle Eastern. For example, in the story, China has a Sultan. Though the book seems like it is for small children because it is in a large format with large size pictures, I would recommend this book for age 9 and up because one character cuts off another's head and you'll probably have to have some cultural discussions, such as to why there are so many slaves, why women wear such skimpy clothes and are helpless in the story, etc.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vickie

    Thank goodness for RecordedBooks and my wishlist. The audiobooks keep me company on my 50 mile RT commute for work and this one did the ticket in 50 miles. Aladdin is a story often told, but this one has a new shine about it as told by Philip Pullman, author of HIS DARK MATERIALS trilogy (THE GOLDEN COMPASS, THE SUBTLE KNIFE, & THE AMBER SPYGLASS). Aladdin is a spoiled shiftless boy, really good for not much, until he finds the Magic Cave via a trickster, claiming to be his uncle. Aladdin become Thank goodness for RecordedBooks and my wishlist. The audiobooks keep me company on my 50 mile RT commute for work and this one did the ticket in 50 miles. Aladdin is a story often told, but this one has a new shine about it as told by Philip Pullman, author of HIS DARK MATERIALS trilogy (THE GOLDEN COMPASS, THE SUBTLE KNIFE, & THE AMBER SPYGLASS). Aladdin is a spoiled shiftless boy, really good for not much, until he finds the Magic Cave via a trickster, claiming to be his uncle. Aladdin becomes trapped in the cave after finding the lamp he was sent for by the trickster 'Uncle', giving Aladdin time to think about his life, find the lamp and a magic ring. We know the lamp has a jinee, but so does the ring. With all of this at his beck and call, Aladdin gets out of the cave, goes on adventures, marries the princess, and basically lives HEA...the getting there part is the coolest of the cool adventures. Yes, it's labeled to be for 7-10 year olds....whatever! I'm super in touch with my inner 7-10 year old! I had a great time being pulled in by the story as told by Pullman and the narration of James Goode, who can give Jim Dale a run for his money, I'm thinkin'....

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dan Thompson

    Perhaps it is the actual story of 'Aladdin' that just doesn't so it for me? I think Pullman does a good job at writing the story, and it has a few nice revelations in too. For instance, I didn't know that the story takes place in China, not Arabia. I guess that's what we get for believing in Disney too much. The evil antagonist is just the right amount of creepy to justify your wanting of Aladdin to win, especially when the lamp is stolen from underneath his nose! The only thing is, Aladdin is a Perhaps it is the actual story of 'Aladdin' that just doesn't so it for me? I think Pullman does a good job at writing the story, and it has a few nice revelations in too. For instance, I didn't know that the story takes place in China, not Arabia. I guess that's what we get for believing in Disney too much. The evil antagonist is just the right amount of creepy to justify your wanting of Aladdin to win, especially when the lamp is stolen from underneath his nose! The only thing is, Aladdin is a completely unrelatable character - he's arrogant, mean and extremely demanding. I found him to be quite annoying. The pictures give great charm and character to the setting, which is probably why I've rated it higher than I would have otherwise. The story in itself is rather naive - there's usually a moral to these types of yarns, but I failed to see one. It was great to see the contrast between the Jinnie of the Ring and the Jinnie of the Lamp though. Give this a go if classical fairy tales are your thing and your interested to read the real story of Aladdin, otherwise, just pop the film into your DVD player instead.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Eden

    Aladdin was always getting into trouble and even when his father passed, he continued doing the same. He wouldn't get a job, or change his ways. Then one day a man named Moor comes along and claims to be his uncle. One night, Moor takes Aladdin and makes him go in search of a Lamp. He is not to touch anything, but the Lamp and then come straight back. Aladdin soon figures out that Moor is not his uncle, but only using him. When Moor discovers he's been found out, he uses his magic to bury Aladdi Aladdin was always getting into trouble and even when his father passed, he continued doing the same. He wouldn't get a job, or change his ways. Then one day a man named Moor comes along and claims to be his uncle. One night, Moor takes Aladdin and makes him go in search of a Lamp. He is not to touch anything, but the Lamp and then come straight back. Aladdin soon figures out that Moor is not his uncle, but only using him. When Moor discovers he's been found out, he uses his magic to bury Aladdin in the cave so he cannot come out and Moor leaves. However, Aladdin soon discovers the power of the items he has found. This was a nice retelling. The artwork was also nice and I really enjoyed Pullman's retelling of this story. This is a book I would read again.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michael Ronn

    I didn't care for this version. I think the translation was ok, but my main problem with the story was the story itself. There are two tales---the first one is the source of the story, originating in Persia. I actually liked that one. The second was the Aladdin tale that is most familiar to mythology buffs. I liked it up until he gets the lamp. I thought the duplicitous sorcerer was a great villain, even if the magic didn't make much sense (why couldn't he get the lamp himself). After that, the I didn't care for this version. I think the translation was ok, but my main problem with the story was the story itself. There are two tales---the first one is the source of the story, originating in Persia. I actually liked that one. The second was the Aladdin tale that is most familiar to mythology buffs. I liked it up until he gets the lamp. I thought the duplicitous sorcerer was a great villain, even if the magic didn't make much sense (why couldn't he get the lamp himself). After that, the story is quit uneventful and turns into the "boy meets girl" thing, with a happily ever after ending. If you are interested in Middle Eastern/Indian myths, you're better off reading the Arabian Nights.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Blake Bramley

    I've made it a mission of mine to read as many traditional tales re-written by modern authors as I can (suggestions appreciated!), as I'm honestly not a big fan of them... I have yet to read much else of Phillip Pullman, but of course have heard a lot of good about his work. Although Aladdin isn't one of my personal favourites, I did enjoy this retelling. It felt closer to the original story than most, with a good amount of modern pantomime and humour. It had a good balance vocabulary wise: Some o I've made it a mission of mine to read as many traditional tales re-written by modern authors as I can (suggestions appreciated!), as I'm honestly not a big fan of them... I have yet to read much else of Phillip Pullman, but of course have heard a lot of good about his work. Although Aladdin isn't one of my personal favourites, I did enjoy this retelling. It felt closer to the original story than most, with a good amount of modern pantomime and humour. It had a good balance vocabulary wise: Some of the language may be a little challenging or outdated for children and involve some research/scaffolding/questioning, whilst others were clearly described in a more modern way to help children see the links to the real-world (history, geography etc).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    I started out reading this because I was bored, and found that I actually enjoyed it. There were a number of surprises, such as the fact that the story is actually set in China, not the Middle East and the fact that Alaeddin isn't a mostly-innocent hero, but actually a very lazy boy. You learn these two things at the very start of the story and I won't give spoilers by mentioning the others, but suffice to say that while the plot is slightly familiar in the beginning, the ending is actually fair I started out reading this because I was bored, and found that I actually enjoyed it. There were a number of surprises, such as the fact that the story is actually set in China, not the Middle East and the fact that Alaeddin isn't a mostly-innocent hero, but actually a very lazy boy. You learn these two things at the very start of the story and I won't give spoilers by mentioning the others, but suffice to say that while the plot is slightly familiar in the beginning, the ending is actually fairly different from the "westernized" version of the story that I grew up with. All the differences left me really wondering what would happen next, resulting in an enjoyable experience.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Meltha

    I read this in English, but the only one with Sophy Williams as the illustrator on Goodreads seems to be the French title, which is odd. This was a longer version of Aladdin than typical, with a few more details thrown in here and there including more about Fatima the slave girl. The sorcerer's brother is left out. There were some slightly troubling aspects, too. Aladdin is very insulting to his mother a few times even after he supposedly matures, and the sorcerer's execution is more of a murder I read this in English, but the only one with Sophy Williams as the illustrator on Goodreads seems to be the French title, which is odd. This was a longer version of Aladdin than typical, with a few more details thrown in here and there including more about Fatima the slave girl. The sorcerer's brother is left out. There were some slightly troubling aspects, too. Aladdin is very insulting to his mother a few times even after he supposedly matures, and the sorcerer's execution is more of a murder considering he was unconscious at the time and apparently likely to stay that way anyway. Williams's illustrations were very beautiful, though, and complimented the story well.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ahdom

    I wanted to introduce the story of Aladdin to my kids. I have never read any translation of this tale in The Arabian Nights and I do indeed plan to, but for the sake of time and digestibility, I thought this version would suffice. I thought the pictures were really intriguing and I thought the story was great. I find myself wondering about the real story and the context in which it was written. I was happy with this version and even happier that Pullman was the author. I wanted to introduce the story of Aladdin to my kids. I have never read any translation of this tale in The Arabian Nights and I do indeed plan to, but for the sake of time and digestibility, I thought this version would suffice. I thought the pictures were really intriguing and I thought the story was great. I find myself wondering about the real story and the context in which it was written. I was happy with this version and even happier that Pullman was the author.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Spelbring

    I did like reading it, when I was reading the story and not annotations or footnotes regarding the translation. As I mentioned before, its good that it's there, but it is boring to read. The story doesn't contain much for conflict as nothing seriously bad happens. The princess is scared for awhile but a jinn appears to help with the rescue. Alaeddin can't get the girl so the Jinn is called upon. It reads a bit like a personal fantasy tale, what would happen if you got everything you'd ever wishe I did like reading it, when I was reading the story and not annotations or footnotes regarding the translation. As I mentioned before, its good that it's there, but it is boring to read. The story doesn't contain much for conflict as nothing seriously bad happens. The princess is scared for awhile but a jinn appears to help with the rescue. Alaeddin can't get the girl so the Jinn is called upon. It reads a bit like a personal fantasy tale, what would happen if you got everything you'd ever wished for with no consequences? A classic yes, but not terribly entertaining.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    03/10: This was a hard read. The language is old. But, we made it through. Inside Cover: Who has not wished for a magic lamp and a genie to grant every wish? Aladdin is only the scapegrace son of a poor tailor in China, but with luck and wit he outfoxes a Moroccan wizard, claims the magic lamp -- with its dazzling riches -- and becomes a prince endowed by destiny "with days the most delectable." The story of Aladdin and his wonderful lamp is one of the most satisfying and well loved of all Schehe 03/10: This was a hard read. The language is old. But, we made it through. Inside Cover: Who has not wished for a magic lamp and a genie to grant every wish? Aladdin is only the scapegrace son of a poor tailor in China, but with luck and wit he outfoxes a Moroccan wizard, claims the magic lamp -- with its dazzling riches -- and becomes a prince endowed by destiny "with days the most delectable." The story of Aladdin and his wonderful lamp is one of the most satisfying and well loved of all Scheherazade's tales in "The Arabian Nights."

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    The author of The Dark Materials Trilogy brings to life one of the greatest and classic Arab-Persian stories, (although the story is set in China) ever told. Be prepared to go on a magic carpet ride when reading this vivid retelling of  Aladdin, a poor tailor's son who becomes a wealthy prince with the help of a magic lamp he finds in an enchanted cave. This is a story that has everything - comedy, drama, fantasy, magic, fear, excitement and a terrific plot. The author of The Dark Materials Trilogy brings to life one of the greatest and classic Arab-Persian stories, (although the story is set in China) ever told. Be prepared to go on a magic carpet ride when reading this vivid retelling of  Aladdin, a poor tailor's son who becomes a wealthy prince with the help of a magic lamp he finds in an enchanted cave. This is a story that has everything - comedy, drama, fantasy, magic, fear, excitement and a terrific plot.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    Philip Pullman retells the famous tale of Aladdin with more skill than Disney (in my opinion). While waiting the as yet to be written third "Book of Dust," I'm attempting to read Pullman's other works. His writing does not disappoint. I listened to the audio book for this and found the reader to be good - except in his bellowing of dialogue. Volume consistency is something I value audio books. Philip Pullman retells the famous tale of Aladdin with more skill than Disney (in my opinion). While waiting the as yet to be written third "Book of Dust," I'm attempting to read Pullman's other works. His writing does not disappoint. I listened to the audio book for this and found the reader to be good - except in his bellowing of dialogue. Volume consistency is something I value audio books.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hayley Shaver

    I loved this grown-up version of Aladdin. This version was, of course, featuring Alladin and the lamp, but it had more detail, violence, and murders than the Disney (children's) version. This book also includes another short story by the same anonymous person who wrote the Aladdin fable. It is also very entertaining. I loved this grown-up version of Aladdin. This version was, of course, featuring Alladin and the lamp, but it had more detail, violence, and murders than the Disney (children's) version. This book also includes another short story by the same anonymous person who wrote the Aladdin fable. It is also very entertaining.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Oznasia

    There must be many editions of this book. This one is listed here with a French title but it is the one with the same illustrations as the one that I read although I did read the English version. I found the story quite engaging and the illustrations ok but not wonderful. My one concern is that it glorifies being rich. That is not a message that I would choose to be sharing with children.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    Warning: It is nothing like the Disney story (which is NOT why I didn't like it.) I did not feel Alaeddin was a sympathetic character and it was much too wordy. I only skimmed the second half and if it were not that the book was so short, I don't think I would have finished. Warning: It is nothing like the Disney story (which is NOT why I didn't like it.) I did not feel Alaeddin was a sympathetic character and it was much too wordy. I only skimmed the second half and if it were not that the book was so short, I don't think I would have finished.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Fern

    Bought this for my niece. Nice enough retelling of Aladdin, but doesn't have the snap crackle and pop of Pullman's better stuff. Still I think my niece will love the wayang kulit illustrations and the age-old tale Bought this for my niece. Nice enough retelling of Aladdin, but doesn't have the snap crackle and pop of Pullman's better stuff. Still I think my niece will love the wayang kulit illustrations and the age-old tale

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.