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Secrets of Feeding a Healthy Family

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An internationally recognized authority on eating and feeding, Ellen Satter is a registered dietitian and board certified diplomat in clinical social work. For the first time in book form, Secrets of Feeding a Healthy Family outlines her unconventional and remarkably effective eating advice for adults. More a cooking primer than a cookbook, Satter’s simple and delicious re An internationally recognized authority on eating and feeding, Ellen Satter is a registered dietitian and board certified diplomat in clinical social work. For the first time in book form, Secrets of Feeding a Healthy Family outlines her unconventional and remarkably effective eating advice for adults. More a cooking primer than a cookbook, Satter’s simple and delicious recipes provide a backdrop for cooking lessons, fast tips, night-before suggestions, in-depth background information, ways to involve kids in the kitchen and guidelines on adapting menus for young children. Satter cites the studies to build a convincing case that we can lighten up on fat and sodium restriction without endangering ourselves or our children, while emphasizing her well-known division of responsibility in feeding — parents are responsible for the what, when and where of feeding, and children are responsible for the how much and whether of eating.


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An internationally recognized authority on eating and feeding, Ellen Satter is a registered dietitian and board certified diplomat in clinical social work. For the first time in book form, Secrets of Feeding a Healthy Family outlines her unconventional and remarkably effective eating advice for adults. More a cooking primer than a cookbook, Satter’s simple and delicious re An internationally recognized authority on eating and feeding, Ellen Satter is a registered dietitian and board certified diplomat in clinical social work. For the first time in book form, Secrets of Feeding a Healthy Family outlines her unconventional and remarkably effective eating advice for adults. More a cooking primer than a cookbook, Satter’s simple and delicious recipes provide a backdrop for cooking lessons, fast tips, night-before suggestions, in-depth background information, ways to involve kids in the kitchen and guidelines on adapting menus for young children. Satter cites the studies to build a convincing case that we can lighten up on fat and sodium restriction without endangering ourselves or our children, while emphasizing her well-known division of responsibility in feeding — parents are responsible for the what, when and where of feeding, and children are responsible for the how much and whether of eating.

30 review for Secrets of Feeding a Healthy Family

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This is a great book. I love Ellyn Satter's viewpoint on feeding children (and ourselves). Basically her opinion is that we're all too paranoid about adhering to strict rules about what and how much we should eat, and that our bodies naturally regulate enough for us. She endorses having family meals, and that the parents are responsible for providing the meals at appropriate times, but the children are responsible for deciding what parts of the meal and how much they want to eat. I had been worr This is a great book. I love Ellyn Satter's viewpoint on feeding children (and ourselves). Basically her opinion is that we're all too paranoid about adhering to strict rules about what and how much we should eat, and that our bodies naturally regulate enough for us. She endorses having family meals, and that the parents are responsible for providing the meals at appropriate times, but the children are responsible for deciding what parts of the meal and how much they want to eat. I had been worried about Rachel's picky eating habits and had been starting to try to force her to eat certain things. I'm now changing that attitude, and I can already see it making a difference for the better. I think this is a good read especially for young mothers. The author has also written a book called "Child of Mine" that I also plan on reading, though I'm expecting it to be more of the same.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Recommended by a friend who also happens to be a dietician, this book has changed the way we view Abigail's eating. Written like a textbook, the author encourages you to read only the parts you need. Our meal times have been transformed using her stress-free approach to family meals and scheduled snacks around the table. We are happier, not cooking multiple meals, and Abigail is trying more new things daily. This is a must read for any new parent or any parent struggling with a "picky" eater. Recommended by a friend who also happens to be a dietician, this book has changed the way we view Abigail's eating. Written like a textbook, the author encourages you to read only the parts you need. Our meal times have been transformed using her stress-free approach to family meals and scheduled snacks around the table. We are happier, not cooking multiple meals, and Abigail is trying more new things daily. This is a must read for any new parent or any parent struggling with a "picky" eater.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This book is a must read for everyone. Yes, it appears to be geared towards families with children, but Satter's definition of "family" includes any possible configuration one could think of, including single people. You could easily skip the section that deals primarily with children and still get everything important out of this book. And if you *do* have children, this book may be even more important, in terms of providing your kids with the basis for a healthy relationship with food and pote This book is a must read for everyone. Yes, it appears to be geared towards families with children, but Satter's definition of "family" includes any possible configuration one could think of, including single people. You could easily skip the section that deals primarily with children and still get everything important out of this book. And if you *do* have children, this book may be even more important, in terms of providing your kids with the basis for a healthy relationship with food and potentially preventing eating disorders which are becoming more and more prevalent and at younger ages. The book is straightforward, evidence based (with citations all over the place) and sensible. Go pick it up and check it out. You will thank yourself, I think.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christi

    This is an interesting book. I'm glad I read it (quickly) and thought it had some really interesting things. It'd promotes a healthy and unbiased view of eating and dieting without using shame or fear too much. It also offers practical advice for parents who are overworked and have no time to make sure the food is perfect. There were things I liked and didn't, but overall it just wasn't groundbreaking for me. I'm not sure I'm the target audience though, since I'm not so much worried about dietin This is an interesting book. I'm glad I read it (quickly) and thought it had some really interesting things. It'd promotes a healthy and unbiased view of eating and dieting without using shame or fear too much. It also offers practical advice for parents who are overworked and have no time to make sure the food is perfect. There were things I liked and didn't, but overall it just wasn't groundbreaking for me. I'm not sure I'm the target audience though, since I'm not so much worried about dieting or my weight or eating disorders. So a good read, but nothing I'd have missed if I hadn't read it. *I am trying out her method on my kids though, so this may change depending on the results of my experiment.* Four stars for being scientific, laid back, not alarmist!, and for only a little blaming of the parents :) Pros--it is based on science, and she is actually a certified professional. So many of these eating books right now are just people who are interested, but have no background! I also liked her approach to just trusting yourself and giving yourself permission to enjoy your food/eat/etc. (I also liked her coping techniques when food gets you emotionally anxious, etc.) I enjoyed reading her new take on parenting kids to be good eaters and am interested in trying some of out it. I found her writing direct and easy to understand without being too scientific or jargon-y. Cons--The book isn't groundbreaking. I imagine working with her would be more so. The book also feels like a major pitch for her program/practice which I found off-putting. I really liked the parenting/teaching kids chapters but they make up a tiny portion of the book. The last half of the book is cooking techniques and recipes that are REALLY basic and, while healthy, are probably the kind of recipes most of us grew up on when Mom didn't feel like cooking (tuna noodle casserole, anyone?) Although it was interesting to skim that, I didn't find it that helpful for my or my family's tastes. To be fair, it would be immensely helpful to someone who doesn't feel like they know their way around a kitchen or feeding a family.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Katharine

    As an RD and mom, I'm a longtime disciple of Ellyn Satter's division of feeding responsibility with kids. I think her books should be required reading for parents- I see so many adult eating issues that date back to poor family eating habits. I'm not talking about nutrition, I'm talking about the act of feeding + teaching your kids to be competent eaters. Her writing style is easy and enjoyable to read, yet also appealing to academics with the research-based appendices. The only negatives of thi As an RD and mom, I'm a longtime disciple of Ellyn Satter's division of feeding responsibility with kids. I think her books should be required reading for parents- I see so many adult eating issues that date back to poor family eating habits. I'm not talking about nutrition, I'm talking about the act of feeding + teaching your kids to be competent eaters. Her writing style is easy and enjoyable to read, yet also appealing to academics with the research-based appendices. The only negatives of this book (for me) are that the recipes (only a portion of the book) don't seem overly appealing, and that I think she suggests offering too many foods at each meal- I totally understand mixing familiar with new foods at each meal, but if I offered bread and milk at each meal, my child would actually be *less* inclined to eat the more adventurous things. Those are teeny, tiny criticisms of a fantastic book- HIGHLY recommend for parents, parents-to-be, and nutrition professionals. Also recommend her 'Child of Mine' book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    What I learned: Don't be a food snob. If you paralyze yourself with food rules and moral judgments about food you will end up at the drive through. Trust yourself and your ability to know when you have eaten enough. Provide yourself (and your family) with regular meals and snacks. Don't go more than 2-3 hours without eating. Division of responsibility = you provide when, where, what to eat and kids decide if and how much they will eat. Don't follow food fashion. Don't worry about macronutrients. What I learned: Don't be a food snob. If you paralyze yourself with food rules and moral judgments about food you will end up at the drive through. Trust yourself and your ability to know when you have eaten enough. Provide yourself (and your family) with regular meals and snacks. Don't go more than 2-3 hours without eating. Division of responsibility = you provide when, where, what to eat and kids decide if and how much they will eat. Don't follow food fashion. Don't worry about macronutrients. At mealtimes make one meal for everyone but make sure there is one universally liked food at every meal (bread is fine). Take the pressure off and continue to offer a variety of foods - even if they are consistently rejected.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I'm a registered dietitian nutritionist and plan on having children, so I have a personal as well as a professional interest in this topic. This book is ground-breaking for helping parents guide their kids to become healthy, normal eaters! I plan on giving it to all of my friends when they have kids. It helps to lay the foundation for peaceful family mealtimes and healthy relationships with food for children (and parents, too). The recipe section gave some good ideas for ways to flavor foods to I'm a registered dietitian nutritionist and plan on having children, so I have a personal as well as a professional interest in this topic. This book is ground-breaking for helping parents guide their kids to become healthy, normal eaters! I plan on giving it to all of my friends when they have kids. It helps to lay the foundation for peaceful family mealtimes and healthy relationships with food for children (and parents, too). The recipe section gave some good ideas for ways to flavor foods to make them enjoyable to eat (particularly fruits and vegetables), but that section of the book was just a bonus in my opinion - not what made the book amazing.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jaraka Davis

    A good and useful read. It fundamentally boils down to the division of responsibility in feeding. Parents decide when and what and where to eat, the kids decide whether and how much to eat. Leadership and autonomy. I read the paper back physical book and underlined a lot! I’m sure I’ll flip through it again and again when feeding the family feels like a lot. Easier said than done, for me at least. So I appreciated the additional guidance the book offers.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Great overview of how to organize for, prepare and enjoy your meals. The section on getting "picky" children to eat was interesting and empowering. I will be picking up her book on children specifically as a follow up. A lot of this book was how to change your own bad mindset on food....which I don't have lol. Great overview of how to organize for, prepare and enjoy your meals. The section on getting "picky" children to eat was interesting and empowering. I will be picking up her book on children specifically as a follow up. A lot of this book was how to change your own bad mindset on food....which I don't have lol.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Wolfley

    I love Ellyn’s writing style and her practical way of teaching nutrition. Some information is slightly out of date by this point, but what she shares about our problems with food are as true as ever. Her simple lessons have given me a lot of confidence as a parent in feeding myself and my family well.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Grinestaff

    Well worth the read to get a better grasp on how our attitudes towards eating effect our health and our kids. Even if you don’t end up agreeing with everything, there are great ideas in here worth consideration!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Molly Moody

    Highly recommend regardless of whether you have kiddos or not. Very challenging look at our perspectives on food & how we eat. Extra great read if you are starting out your family. Lots of food for thought. 😁

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    5 starts for the needing kids section

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Solid and practical.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Giedra

    Overlaps heavily with the other Satter book I read. Basic premise of both is that it is parents' job to arrange the "what and where" of eating and children's job to decide on "whether and how much." For it to work, parents have to be consistent about timing of meals and snacks, sitting down together for all meals and snacks, putting enough things on the table that no one will go hungry even if they don't like the main offerings (she suggests bread and butter at every meal), and to avoid grazing. Overlaps heavily with the other Satter book I read. Basic premise of both is that it is parents' job to arrange the "what and where" of eating and children's job to decide on "whether and how much." For it to work, parents have to be consistent about timing of meals and snacks, sitting down together for all meals and snacks, putting enough things on the table that no one will go hungry even if they don't like the main offerings (she suggests bread and butter at every meal), and to avoid grazing. The idea is that if a child knows what to expect and knows he won't leave the table hungry, and especially if this is true from the beginning of his life, he will be able to obey his body's cues that he is full, and will properly regulate the right amount to eat to grow appropriately into the body that has been genetically predetermined for him. I generally like the premise; I'm not as big a fan of the work required to be REALLY CONSISTENT about timing and planning, etc. But she is also a realistic dietitian--this book doesn't emphasize counting calories or servings of vegetables or anything like that. She emphasizes more the patterns of eating. Once you have a consistent PATTERN of eating, if you need to modify WHAT you are eating, you can do that next. She even says that McDonald's every day, if eaten together at a table instead of on-the-go in the car, is in many ways preferable to getting thrown a granola bar or told to scrounge for oneself. In any case, you only need to read one Satter book to learn everything you need to know. If you have any concerns about your child's weight (over or under) (or even your own weight--as reading this one will give you clues to the origins of your own food issues, if any), read the one called "Your Child's Weight: Helping without Harming." If not, this one is more general, and has sections on meal planning.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Denser than I was expecting, with two columns of teeny-tiny print per page. But don't be daunted; it's worth the effort. Satter goes through reams of evidence and theory (which it is OK to skim) to explain why you should serve organized family meals with set menus and then let your kids be in charge of whether and how much they eat from what you have provided. Her dietary approach is relaxed--evidence suggests that restrictive diets of any kind, especially out in the real world, do most people m Denser than I was expecting, with two columns of teeny-tiny print per page. But don't be daunted; it's worth the effort. Satter goes through reams of evidence and theory (which it is OK to skim) to explain why you should serve organized family meals with set menus and then let your kids be in charge of whether and how much they eat from what you have provided. Her dietary approach is relaxed--evidence suggests that restrictive diets of any kind, especially out in the real world, do most people more harm than good. Her focus is more on the how of eating than the what--on developing "eating competence" (feeling good about what you eat, enjoying your food, having regular meals, liking new foods and eating a variety). Beyond, the details, she insists, just aren't that important. Once she has explained in detail what eating competence is and why it's important, and then laid out her principles for feeding children, the third part of the book is about menu planning and cooking. She admits that even if you're efficient and you don't cook fancy food, it's a lot of work--so she also talks about how to give yourself a break from it. I already cooked food at dinnertime but have enjoyed so far implementing some of her recommendations, like putting a wider variety of food on the table (saves me having to leap up because someone wants cheese) and not nagging my kids during dinner. It felt weirdly extravagant to pass over a fourth piece of bread, but she was pretty convincing that this will balance out eventually, so... go for it, little dude! It's refreshing to read something that is so detailed and extensively researched and at the same time, so laid back in its recommendations.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Colette

    Restarted May 2015. After 6 months, I finally got around to finishing this book. I did like it, I just had other things I wanted to read. There were a lot of basic food discussions in the cooking parts that I didn't really need, but they would surly be helpful for someone who doesn't currently do a lot of cooking. Where this book excels is in the discussions about different aspects of our relationship with food. I learned that I don't have to be so uptight and concerned about what I am eating and Restarted May 2015. After 6 months, I finally got around to finishing this book. I did like it, I just had other things I wanted to read. There were a lot of basic food discussions in the cooking parts that I didn't really need, but they would surly be helpful for someone who doesn't currently do a lot of cooking. Where this book excels is in the discussions about different aspects of our relationship with food. I learned that I don't have to be so uptight and concerned about what I am eating and serving. I am also glad to have the knowledge of how children eat and learn positive thinking about food and eating. I feel like I can be a much more calm and laid-back parent when it comes to mealtime after having read this. I would be interested to know how Satter's views have held up in the 17 years since this was published. Nutrition seems to be so political. After having just read Dr. A's Habits of Health, I think I have a more solid foundation upon which to build my attitudes toward food and health. These two authors don't have the same ideas by any means, but they are on the same page when it comes to using our intuition and not going crazy about fat and salt.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    It had some good ideas. I didn't finish it before it was due at the library and Becca is no longer considered underweight, so I stopped worrying about how I feed the family. I do remember one of her suggestions that I thought was good. She said when learning to recognize when you're full and stop eating before you've over-eaten, start by only eating one bite every minute. Really pay attention to that bite. While you're still hungry the food will taste wonderful, absolutely delicious. As you reac It had some good ideas. I didn't finish it before it was due at the library and Becca is no longer considered underweight, so I stopped worrying about how I feed the family. I do remember one of her suggestions that I thought was good. She said when learning to recognize when you're full and stop eating before you've over-eaten, start by only eating one bite every minute. Really pay attention to that bite. While you're still hungry the food will taste wonderful, absolutely delicious. As you reach satiation, the taste will be less impressive. When it doesn't taste great anymore, when you're just eating because it's there, you've passed the point that you need it. I think that idea is very interesting. I do tend to eat until my plate is empty, and sometimes until the kids' plates are empty. I don't always stop when the taste is no longer drawing me back for more.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    I am really loving this book--I've been dabbling with intuitive/mindful eating for some time but Ms. Satter's method adds discpline into the mix. It's not just eat on demand, but eat at regular intervals and I'm amazed at what a difference this small change has made. It's also completely changed our mealtimes. I have been so stressed, acting as short order cook to our 3-year old and it's been such a wonderful, relaxing change to set all the food on the table, and say, "here we are--eat what you I am really loving this book--I've been dabbling with intuitive/mindful eating for some time but Ms. Satter's method adds discpline into the mix. It's not just eat on demand, but eat at regular intervals and I'm amazed at what a difference this small change has made. It's also completely changed our mealtimes. I have been so stressed, acting as short order cook to our 3-year old and it's been such a wonderful, relaxing change to set all the food on the table, and say, "here we are--eat what you like," and know that a snack is only a couple hours away if he doesn't eat well. Absolutely a great read, very common sense and I love the author's personal, down-to-earth writing voice. Would highly recommend to anyone who has food issues (parent or not), particularly to anyone who is a recovering dieter.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erin Price

    I think every parent who's having trouble with their kids' eating habits could probably benefit from reading a book by Ellyn Satter. Implementing the simple routine she suggests (meals and snacks at expected times with no snacking in between, no pressure to eat but one must choose from what is available on the table) had marked beneficial results almost immediately, for everyone. Sure, my two-year-old still won't touch broccoli most days, and many kids will take longer to acclimate, but I'm less I think every parent who's having trouble with their kids' eating habits could probably benefit from reading a book by Ellyn Satter. Implementing the simple routine she suggests (meals and snacks at expected times with no snacking in between, no pressure to eat but one must choose from what is available on the table) had marked beneficial results almost immediately, for everyone. Sure, my two-year-old still won't touch broccoli most days, and many kids will take longer to acclimate, but I'm less stressed about whether she eats any vegetable when she'll get the opportunity to eat more at the next meal.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I read this mostly for advice on feeding my children. No surprise: I'm doing it wrong and I have lots of work ahead of me. I'm a little discouraged, but hope that by implementing some of her advice I can turn things around. I also appreciated her advice on honoring your appetite and trusting your body - an approach similar to eating intuitively. I did not need to read Part 3 on How to Cook. I may have some trouble with feeding my children, but I do, thankfully, know how to cook! I scanned this se I read this mostly for advice on feeding my children. No surprise: I'm doing it wrong and I have lots of work ahead of me. I'm a little discouraged, but hope that by implementing some of her advice I can turn things around. I also appreciated her advice on honoring your appetite and trusting your body - an approach similar to eating intuitively. I did not need to read Part 3 on How to Cook. I may have some trouble with feeding my children, but I do, thankfully, know how to cook! I scanned this section and had to laugh at some of the topics she included - TV cooking shows, buying and using knives, shopping advice. As with all advice, I will take some and leave the rest.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kerstin

    Always looking for ways to sensibly feed my family, especially with a little guy who is quite "picky". This book goes into responsible, healthy ways to feed ourselves and our families. The cultural we live in right now is so unhealthy and destructive towards food and eating. I want my kids to listen to their own bodies, and not have to worry about depriving themselves to fit the social norm. The meal recipes in this book were not my favorite, I think because my skill levels are above the basic m Always looking for ways to sensibly feed my family, especially with a little guy who is quite "picky". This book goes into responsible, healthy ways to feed ourselves and our families. The cultural we live in right now is so unhealthy and destructive towards food and eating. I want my kids to listen to their own bodies, and not have to worry about depriving themselves to fit the social norm. The meal recipes in this book were not my favorite, I think because my skill levels are above the basic meal planning that was taught, but still needed by so many people. I did like some of the "vegetable" recipes and plan on trying them out.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Easy to read and digest (haha, pun not intended!) - definitely a new way to look at feeding kids and in general how we look at food. We have adopted this strategy and are seeing TINY results so far...but will be patient and wait it out. Definitely better than the alternative before, which was a battle every night on how much to eat, etc. So, with that, it's good enough! Thanks, Nicole for introducing this! I'm going to look at her other books for more info on starting these changes earlier than Easy to read and digest (haha, pun not intended!) - definitely a new way to look at feeding kids and in general how we look at food. We have adopted this strategy and are seeing TINY results so far...but will be patient and wait it out. Definitely better than the alternative before, which was a battle every night on how much to eat, etc. So, with that, it's good enough! Thanks, Nicole for introducing this! I'm going to look at her other books for more info on starting these changes earlier than age 3.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maren

    This is a very helpful book for people who are worried about their children's eating habits. She has some very good ideas, and a very "chill" perspective. Obviously the more we worry about the child eating the more pressure everyone feels around food. She divides the eating/feeeding responsibilities, inspiring me to continue to lock my pantry, and eliminate the free for all kitchen behavior that stresses me out. Her audience is people who eat the standard american diet, so my guess is that people This is a very helpful book for people who are worried about their children's eating habits. She has some very good ideas, and a very "chill" perspective. Obviously the more we worry about the child eating the more pressure everyone feels around food. She divides the eating/feeeding responsibilities, inspiring me to continue to lock my pantry, and eliminate the free for all kitchen behavior that stresses me out. Her audience is people who eat the standard american diet, so my guess is that people with restrictive diets would only find the book slightly helpful.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Catherinesheetz

    This is a bare bones and basic introduction to healthy family feeding. Ellyn Satter's main point and one that I whole heartedly support is that the primary reason for eating problems is more emotional than anything else. She has great suggestions for avoiding restricting which leads to eating problems. She also has really good suggestions for healthy family food patterns. I wish everyone involved in the eating/obesity/health discussion would read her books first before commenting further. This is a bare bones and basic introduction to healthy family feeding. Ellyn Satter's main point and one that I whole heartedly support is that the primary reason for eating problems is more emotional than anything else. She has great suggestions for avoiding restricting which leads to eating problems. She also has really good suggestions for healthy family food patterns. I wish everyone involved in the eating/obesity/health discussion would read her books first before commenting further.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rachel McAllister

    I don't have any problems with feeding my toddler, but I was interested in reading this book so I could avoid problems in the future. A lot of what Satter writes is fairly intuitive, but some of the techniques she discusses for handling child behavior, making family meals important, and meal planning/cooking were new to me. I think most people who read through this book will find something worth the read. I don't have any problems with feeding my toddler, but I was interested in reading this book so I could avoid problems in the future. A lot of what Satter writes is fairly intuitive, but some of the techniques she discusses for handling child behavior, making family meals important, and meal planning/cooking were new to me. I think most people who read through this book will find something worth the read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I just finished this and think I've saved myself from a million meals of trying to coerce and nag my kids to eat. Simple, wise strategies to know my boundaries as a parent, as well as to know what's most important statistically speaking (family meals) and still important but not top on the list (nutrition). Our little guy is under two right now, but this book is already saving me stress at the dinner table! I just finished this and think I've saved myself from a million meals of trying to coerce and nag my kids to eat. Simple, wise strategies to know my boundaries as a parent, as well as to know what's most important statistically speaking (family meals) and still important but not top on the list (nutrition). Our little guy is under two right now, but this book is already saving me stress at the dinner table!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Missy

    i'm surprised that i'm enjoying this book. i'm taking a nutrition class and it's required reading (does required reading count towards the lifetime book count? discuss.), but i find the arena of the psychology of food consumption, which i never previously thought about as a field, to be really interesting. i like to eat, i like pop psych -- go figure. i'm surprised that i'm enjoying this book. i'm taking a nutrition class and it's required reading (does required reading count towards the lifetime book count? discuss.), but i find the arena of the psychology of food consumption, which i never previously thought about as a field, to be really interesting. i like to eat, i like pop psych -- go figure.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Posner

    This book promotes an interesting theory about how to ensure your child will have a good relationship with food and eating. It's not easy, but I am glad I know the theory, and will try my best to enact it. It will be interesting to see if my desire to help my daughter grow into a competent eater will encourage me to actually cook family meals once she is a little older. I really hope so! This book promotes an interesting theory about how to ensure your child will have a good relationship with food and eating. It's not easy, but I am glad I know the theory, and will try my best to enact it. It will be interesting to see if my desire to help my daughter grow into a competent eater will encourage me to actually cook family meals once she is a little older. I really hope so!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Great book! Most of the recipes in the cooking section were not that appealing to me. But, it really did help me realize that I probably make cooking more complicated than it needs to be and that was really why I wanted to read this book. Cooking feels like SUCH a drudgery and I did get lots of ideas for simplifying my meals, even if I didn't get lots of recipes. Great book! Most of the recipes in the cooking section were not that appealing to me. But, it really did help me realize that I probably make cooking more complicated than it needs to be and that was really why I wanted to read this book. Cooking feels like SUCH a drudgery and I did get lots of ideas for simplifying my meals, even if I didn't get lots of recipes.

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