web site hit counter The Queen of Air and Darkness and Other Stories - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Queen of Air and Darkness and Other Stories

Availability: Ready to download

Contains the 1972 Hugo Award and Nebula Award-winning story, "The Queen of Air and Darkness" and "The Man Who Came Early". Read by Tom Teti. Contains the 1972 Hugo Award and Nebula Award-winning story, "The Queen of Air and Darkness" and "The Man Who Came Early". Read by Tom Teti.


Compare

Contains the 1972 Hugo Award and Nebula Award-winning story, "The Queen of Air and Darkness" and "The Man Who Came Early". Read by Tom Teti. Contains the 1972 Hugo Award and Nebula Award-winning story, "The Queen of Air and Darkness" and "The Man Who Came Early". Read by Tom Teti.

30 review for The Queen of Air and Darkness and Other Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    4.5 stars. The title story is without a doubt one of grandmaster Poul Anderson's best shorter works, having won Hugo, Nebula and Locus awards in 1971/2. This is a beautifully written story of a furtive, indigenous people on an alien planet recently colonized by humans. The humans are seemingly unaware of the aliens, who are being slowly pushed to extinction as the human presence expands. Told from the POV of a detective on the trail of a missing child, Anderson weaves together elements of both s 4.5 stars. The title story is without a doubt one of grandmaster Poul Anderson's best shorter works, having won Hugo, Nebula and Locus awards in 1971/2. This is a beautifully written story of a furtive, indigenous people on an alien planet recently colonized by humans. The humans are seemingly unaware of the aliens, who are being slowly pushed to extinction as the human presence expands. Told from the POV of a detective on the trail of a missing child, Anderson weaves together elements of both science fiction and fantasy, deeply incorporating the power of myth and superstition to shape human culture.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    This Hugo-winning novella is self-consciously and self-referentially archetypal, making a thoroughly SF story include an alien species waging war through our fears of the Fae. Of course the aliens fight against the humans for the sake of their homeworld. Humans are damn interlopers. Hopelessly outnumbered and outclassed, the aliens tried to understand our fears and superstitions to play upon them and defeat us. What can I say? That I think the premise is awesome, and that I really enjoyed the Sher This Hugo-winning novella is self-consciously and self-referentially archetypal, making a thoroughly SF story include an alien species waging war through our fears of the Fae. Of course the aliens fight against the humans for the sake of their homeworld. Humans are damn interlopers. Hopelessly outnumbered and outclassed, the aliens tried to understand our fears and superstitions to play upon them and defeat us. What can I say? That I think the premise is awesome, and that I really enjoyed the Sherlock riff butting pure logic and observation against the deepest of humanity's fears? That the worldbuilding was pretty damn good for such a short novella? Of course. But what I really wanted after finishing it was a continuation. I wanted Poul Anderson to put that big brain of his to the task of developing the same world and situation beyond a simple resolved kidnapping case and turn it into a fully realized conflict on these archetypal terms, not just a drawing out of this tale, but one that picks up exactly where this leaves off. I feel a bit cheated, or perhaps I'm a bit spoiled by today's grand SF and Fantasy. Maybe I ought to be thankful that such trailblazers such as Poul Anderson were able to seed our minds with such wonderful beginnings, even if the flame is taken up more firmly in other hands later. I can still be very impressed. I love it when Sci-Fi explains Fantasy's deep mythos. I love it even more when its done as well as this. Full props for what it does and when it was done!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mitticus

    My rating is just for Queen of Air and Darkness. We live with our archetypes, but can we live in them? In a distant planet, very much like Earth and called Roland, a toddler disappear, the local police is not helping and a distressed mother hire a P.I. Meanwhile people whisper stories about the Old Folk... Though Sherrinford resembles Sherlock - pipe et al. And has his own theories. Besides he comes from planet Beowulf (not too subtle here) Myth, old fairy tales ... or crafty aliens? The menace My rating is just for Queen of Air and Darkness. We live with our archetypes, but can we live in them? In a distant planet, very much like Earth and called Roland, a toddler disappear, the local police is not helping and a distressed mother hire a P.I. Meanwhile people whisper stories about the Old Folk... Though Sherrinford resembles Sherlock - pipe et al. And has his own theories. Besides he comes from planet Beowulf (not too subtle here) Myth, old fairy tales ... or crafty aliens? The menace of assimilation or extermination in the encounter of old dwellers and the new ones. Half of time I think one, and later, other. But the end was some kind of predictable (view spoiler)[I shudder along with Sherrinford when she talks about a 'reservation' (hide spoiler)] -------------------------- Cuando escuchaba hablar de la Reina, mágica, espléndida y reverenciada, pensaba invariablemente en Bradbury (Crónicas) y todos esos seres desolados y perdidos en medio de un destino lejano. Es siempre intrigante la idea de que nuestros tradiciones, ese yo colectivo, continuen siendo parte de nosotros aun cuando nos encontremos al otro lado de la galaxia. (view spoiler)[ Resulta fascinante que los aliens extraigan precisamente esas ideas (que indican que los primeros colonos fueron de antecedentes celtas), para utilizar precisamente esas imágenes para manipularnos. (hide spoiler)] Se me hace que la magia resulta necesaria en medio de la soledad y el aislamiento, del desplazamiento de nuestras mismas raices. "Homo can truly be called Sapiens when he practices his specialty of being unspecialized. His repeated attempts to freeze himself into an all-answering pattern or culture or ideology or whatever he has named it, have repeatedly brought ruin.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    I've been reluctant to read the more sci-fi ish books by Poul Anderson, for some reason. This is me dipping a toe in, as it were -- though the first story, The Queen of Air and Darkness, does touch on mythology and its uses. I enjoyed all the stories: perhaps the first and last the most. Poul Anderson had a way with words, and definitely not just when he was imitating the Scandanavian sagas. The irritating dialect thing he does wasn't much in evidence here, either, thankfully. I've been reluctant to read the more sci-fi ish books by Poul Anderson, for some reason. This is me dipping a toe in, as it were -- though the first story, The Queen of Air and Darkness, does touch on mythology and its uses. I enjoyed all the stories: perhaps the first and last the most. Poul Anderson had a way with words, and definitely not just when he was imitating the Scandanavian sagas. The irritating dialect thing he does wasn't much in evidence here, either, thankfully.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Whyte

    https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/3154214.html This is a planetary romance, where a distraught mother whose son has been kidnapped by the natives hires the human colony's only private eye to retrieve him. It's a rather uncomfortable mingling of several tropes. The PI hero is part Philip Marlowe, part Sherlock Holmes (his name is Eric Sherrinford) and part Science Genius. It's quite difficult to do noir and aliens together, and Anderson doesn't really succeed. Although the child's captors seem to hav https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/3154214.html This is a planetary romance, where a distraught mother whose son has been kidnapped by the natives hires the human colony's only private eye to retrieve him. It's a rather uncomfortable mingling of several tropes. The PI hero is part Philip Marlowe, part Sherlock Holmes (his name is Eric Sherrinford) and part Science Genius. It's quite difficult to do noir and aliens together, and Anderson doesn't really succeed. Although the child's captors seem to have magical powers, our hero proves that he can Defeat Them With Science (which however I note is itself sufficiently advanced to be indistinguishable from magic). There is a lot of Jungian banter, and very little characterisation. Today's reader will wonder how the Earth people feel that they have the right to take ownership of the planet from its original inhabitants; this question is not asked in the story (or rather the answer is presupposed).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Felix Zilich

    Погонщик Туманов. Борс Голиев. Крейсер «Шариат». В фантастике «золотого века» иногда можно встретить имена настолько густой поэтической силы, что потом неделями нельзя вытравить эти слова из головы. Скромная доза хрестоматийного Пола Андерсона, на которого я сейчас, похоже, жалуюсь, была употреблена совершенно случайно. Решил освежить в памяти «Царицу воздуха и тьмы», за которую старик Пол получил ровно 45 лет назад «Хьюго», «Небулу» и еще что-то из платинового ряда, но потом обнаружил существов Погонщик Туманов. Борс Голиев. Крейсер «Шариат». В фантастике «золотого века» иногда можно встретить имена настолько густой поэтической силы, что потом неделями нельзя вытравить эти слова из головы. Скромная доза хрестоматийного Пола Андерсона, на которого я сейчас, похоже, жалуюсь, была употреблена совершенно случайно. Решил освежить в памяти «Царицу воздуха и тьмы», за которую старик Пол получил ровно 45 лет назад «Хьюго», «Небулу» и еще что-то из платинового ряда, но потом обнаружил существование одноименного сборника - и Остапа унесло. В наше время есть опасная иллюзия, что популярные авторы уровня Пола Андерсона переведена на все сто процентов. Если даже не переведены, достать любую книгу в оригинале - вопрос времени и примерно десяти баксов. Увы, не все так круто. «Царица воздуха и тьмы» - небольшой сборник из шести новелл различной длины, изданный в 1973 году вскоре после получения вышеназванных наград. Чтобы заработать лишний доллар, а заодно собрать под одной обложкой несколько историй из «колонизаторской» линейки. Из этой шестёрки «Царицу» переиздавали неоднократно, еще три рассказа - «Time Lag (1961), «Home (1966), «В мире тени (1967) - были включены в культовый сборник «Фата-Моргана 7» с картиной Вальехо на обложке. Две короткие зарисовки - «The Alien Enemy» (1968) и «The Faun» (1973) - переводить наши издатели явно не стали из-за их вероятной беспонтовости. Они, вроде бы, по две-три страницы, но найти и проверить их вероятную беспонтовость мне не удалось. Сквозная тема сборника: люди, покинувшие Землю, ей больше ничего не должны. За несколько столетий они расползутся по космосу, превратятся в фермеров и фригольдеров, адаптируют под себя иноземцев, а потом перестанут различать науку от магии. Аминь. Пойду поставлю свечку.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sylvie Dale

    I actually only read the story, Queen of Air and Darkness, and I liked it so well I wanted to share that enjoyment. When I mentioned it to my husband, to my surprise, he had read it several times and loved it. It isn't often he and I agree so strongly on one book or story, though we both read lots of science fiction (I, more fantasy). The story is about colonists on Roland and specifically on the continent Artica, which exists in a state of half-night much of the year and is lush and beautiful. I actually only read the story, Queen of Air and Darkness, and I liked it so well I wanted to share that enjoyment. When I mentioned it to my husband, to my surprise, he had read it several times and loved it. It isn't often he and I agree so strongly on one book or story, though we both read lots of science fiction (I, more fantasy). The story is about colonists on Roland and specifically on the continent Artica, which exists in a state of half-night much of the year and is lush and beautiful. Outside the cities live the toughest settlers called Outlayers, and among them has sprung the rebirth of a very old myth of the Old Folk, which are rumored to be faerie-like people and steal human children without a sign once in a while. Even the practical scientific people cannot guess where the missing children went, assuming they must have wandered out of the safety of the encampment and died. The story focuses on a former detective who takes on a private case from a bereft mother who is desperate to find her missing three-year-old boy before it's too late. He happens to be the kind of fearless, pragmatic guy who believes there may be some truth to the tale - and what they find out on the wilderness changes their view of the planet forever. This story has lots of elements that I love - a strong, sensible lead character who is not easily tricked, magic, futuristic science, and we get to see the queen.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Oigres Elessar

    3,5/5 La reina del aire y la oscuridad es una novela corta de Poul Anderson (1926 - 2001) ganadora de los más prestigiosos premios de ciencia ficción: el Hugo, el Locus y el Nebula. En ella, se nos presenta un mundo, Roland, en el que sus colonos viven con preocupación debido a la desaparición de niños pequeños a manos de la población aborigen. La historia sigue el caso de la científica Barbro Cullen, cuyo hijo ha sido raptado por este pueblo en torno al que giran numerosas leyendas. Contrata 3,5/5 La reina del aire y la oscuridad es una novela corta de Poul Anderson (1926 - 2001) ganadora de los más prestigiosos premios de ciencia ficción: el Hugo, el Locus y el Nebula. En ella, se nos presenta un mundo, Roland, en el que sus colonos viven con preocupación debido a la desaparición de niños pequeños a manos de la población aborigen. La historia sigue el caso de la científica Barbro Cullen, cuyo hijo ha sido raptado por este pueblo en torno al que giran numerosas leyendas. Contratará a un detective privado, bastante pintoresco, para ayudarla a recuperar a su hijo. Se describe, a continuación, la entrada en contacto con la Antigua Gente, resolviéndose muchos de los misterios. Esta novela corta tiene muchos elementos originales; su autor logra combinar la ciencia ficción, la fantasía y la mitología de una forma bastante interesante. Algunos diálogos flojean un poco, pero en general me ha parecido una novela bastante notable. Un buen comienzo con este escritor.

  9. 5 out of 5

    De Jan

    3.5 stars.

  10. 5 out of 5

    John Burt

    I came to this story after hearing the song "The Queen of Air and Darkness" at an SF convention in the 1970s -- and looked around at its conclusion to see that Anderson himself had slipped into the room: https://youtu.be/sOQc2dmrKrg The song is beautiful, an excellent version of the familiar tropes of human encounters with the fey. The real impact of it, though, doesn't come until you have read the story, and have learned what is really going on there on the colony planet called Roland, and what I came to this story after hearing the song "The Queen of Air and Darkness" at an SF convention in the 1970s -- and looked around at its conclusion to see that Anderson himself had slipped into the room: https://youtu.be/sOQc2dmrKrg The song is beautiful, an excellent version of the familiar tropes of human encounters with the fey. The real impact of it, though, doesn't come until you have read the story, and have learned what is really going on there on the colony planet called Roland, and what is really happening to those children "carried away by the fairies".

  11. 5 out of 5

    Xabi1990

    6/10 en 2006. Media de los 14 libros leídos del autor: 6/10. Otro autor clásico bastante prolífico y cuyas novelas, en general, entretienen. Hugo, Nébula y Locus arropan a esta novela corta sobre un planeta con habitantes que son como los mitos de las leyendas nórdicas. NO me gustó mucho a pesar de sus premios. Si tuviera que recomendar una de sus novelas me quedaba con "Tiempo de fuego", con 8/10. 6/10 en 2006. Media de los 14 libros leídos del autor: 6/10. Otro autor clásico bastante prolífico y cuyas novelas, en general, entretienen. Hugo, Nébula y Locus arropan a esta novela corta sobre un planeta con habitantes que son como los mitos de las leyendas nórdicas. NO me gustó mucho a pesar de sus premios. Si tuviera que recomendar una de sus novelas me quedaba con "Tiempo de fuego", con 8/10.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cécile C.

    An interesting collection that you had better read whole and in order, as it gets better after you have been able to make a bit more sense of the whole after a couple of stories. The theme of the whole is colonisation under various aspects (relationships with aliens/with a hostile planet/between several planets...). On the whole the stories in themselves are interesting if not absolutely remarkable. There is no very original thinking here. Although the issue of colonisation and the various types An interesting collection that you had better read whole and in order, as it gets better after you have been able to make a bit more sense of the whole after a couple of stories. The theme of the whole is colonisation under various aspects (relationships with aliens/with a hostile planet/between several planets...). On the whole the stories in themselves are interesting if not absolutely remarkable. There is no very original thinking here. Although the issue of colonisation and the various types of tensions it implies was finally addressed with a bit more sensitivity than I feared after readin the title story, still most of the collection remained stuck in very basic images and binary oppositions: civilisation vs nature, the Good Savage vs destructive invaders, courageous and lonely astronauts/cowboys, gentle women that remain utterly passive until, of course, it comes to defending their brood... Nevertheless, since different stories give a different point of view on various aspects of the question, the collection offers a subtler impression than each separate stories. It is also very short and can be read in one day. I would recommend it as very decent SF.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Robin Hobb

    The title story in this book is the one that made me a Poul Anderson fan for life. If one story taught me about the power of myth, it's this one. Because like the young protagonists in the story, I was totally swept away and longed for that world. The title story in this book is the one that made me a Poul Anderson fan for life. If one story taught me about the power of myth, it's this one. Because like the young protagonists in the story, I was totally swept away and longed for that world.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nigel Roberts

    I often dip my toes into an Anderson book. I find them in charity shops and car boots regularly. I generally know what I am getting. An easy read filled with great imagination. This was one of his better collections. There was a great deal of political undercurrent to each story here and in this post brexit world they seemed to resonate and be more relevant than hitherto. Thoroughly enjoyable, well written and haunting - especially in the title story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    This small book contains six short stories by Poul Anderson. Thought-provoking science fiction. This is an example of the serious science fiction that explores themes from the larger human landscape using the future as a frame for the discussion. I was most impressed w/ the stories "Home" and "The Alien Enemy." "Home" challenges the notion that we always want to return to where we came from, the notion of diaspora. A small colony of humans have been living on Mithras, using it as a base, as the M This small book contains six short stories by Poul Anderson. Thought-provoking science fiction. This is an example of the serious science fiction that explores themes from the larger human landscape using the future as a frame for the discussion. I was most impressed w/ the stories "Home" and "The Alien Enemy." "Home" challenges the notion that we always want to return to where we came from, the notion of diaspora. A small colony of humans have been living on Mithras, using it as a base, as the Mithrans are peaceful and accept their presence. However, Earth is getting poor and weak, and those on Earth are pulling out of expensive endeavors like this base - on top of the growing concerns about the impacts a stronger culture (human) will have on the natives in the long run. A crew comes w/ a ship to take everyone home, and this assumption of willingness to return is challenged w/ drastic results. Both sides are both right and wrong; the conflict is compared to the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. Common Themes: --the idea that space exploration is connected to human freedom and development, to learning - that to restrict it was to be the end of humanity; that without it, we'd continue to repeat history --stories with no clear antagonist - the two sides doing what they think is best still at odds *spoiler alert* In "The Alien Enemy" Earth was over-populated and damaged - there were only vistas and clean air for the rich. For those willing, opportunities were made available to colonize planets, some more hospitable than others. The planet Sibylla was one of the most inhospitable planets due to multiple environmental factors - the colonists had been living there for ~200 years with very little gain or infrastructure. Even more alarming was the alien enemy attack several generations ago that appeared to have set them back even more, reducing their cities and populations. These alien invaders were a new problem and a very large concern to Earth. Investigations uncovered a shocking secret - the depths a community was willing to go to return home.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (Harmonybites)

    This slim paperback of 144 pages contains 6 short works. In his introduction Anderson says the stories "are not related in the sense of projecting a single history of the future." They could be though--they read as fairly consistent with each other, projecting space-faring humans and colonies--but within relativistic limits. No faster-than-life-travel here, and more than one story refers to an Earth "Directorate" ordering global affairs. The first, the title story "The Queen of Air and Darkness" This slim paperback of 144 pages contains 6 short works. In his introduction Anderson says the stories "are not related in the sense of projecting a single history of the future." They could be though--they read as fairly consistent with each other, projecting space-faring humans and colonies--but within relativistic limits. No faster-than-life-travel here, and more than one story refers to an Earth "Directorate" ordering global affairs. The first, the title story "The Queen of Air and Darkness" is the longest and arguably Anderson's most famous short work, and my favorite in the anthology. It won the Hugo Award for Best Novella in 1972, and the Nebula Award for Best Novelette in 1971. It reworks the old Celtic legends of faery into a science fiction story, and quite cleverly. It's protagonist investigator is obviously modeled on Sherlock Holmes. "Home" is a moving short story that asks some interesting questions about forces of history and definitions of home. Another short story, "The Alien Enemy," like several stories here suffers from infodump--too much exposition given too artificially--but it has a neat twist. I thought the novelette "In the Shadow" also suffered from infodump, but did appreciate the hard science premises you find in classic science fiction. I didn't care for the short story, "The Faun" which I thought the weakest work in the collection. I did very much like the novelettte "Time Lag"--every bit as much as the more celebrated opening story. Anderson uses the time lag of relativistic space travel to good effect there. All in all, an enjoyable book that begins and ends strongly even if it sags a bit in the middle.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Fantasy Literature

    Short story anthologies tend to be difficult to review, mostly because it’s hard to come up with a cohesive theme to discuss when the stories can be so diverse in quality and in tone. Fortunately for me, Poul Anderson seems to have gone out of his way in this little collection to ensure that any reviewer had no such problems here. The stories are actually remarkably similar in setting, tone, and theme. They also share much the same flaws. So while I will deal with the stories individually, I can Short story anthologies tend to be difficult to review, mostly because it’s hard to come up with a cohesive theme to discuss when the stories can be so diverse in quality and in tone. Fortunately for me, Poul Anderson seems to have gone out of his way in this little collection to ensure that any reviewer had no such problems here. The stories are actually remarkably similar in setting, tone, and theme. They also share much the same flaws. So while I will deal with the stories individually, I can also discuss them in general. Each story in the collection is planetary romance of some description. Anderson apparently doesn’t buy into warp drives or wormholes, so voyages across the stars are always slow and expensive. In each story, humans establish colonies on some ... Read More: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/revi...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Raj

    This is a small collection of short stories from the prolific Mr Anderson. There is no real unifying theme to them other than the idea that the universe is stranger than our science yet knows. All the stories are set in relativistic universes, so FTL is a no-no, and in at least one story (Time Lag) this is used to good effect. The title story is eerily moody, evoking ancient myths on another world in the far future while most of the rest deal with colonisation in a universe where the speed of lig This is a small collection of short stories from the prolific Mr Anderson. There is no real unifying theme to them other than the idea that the universe is stranger than our science yet knows. All the stories are set in relativistic universes, so FTL is a no-no, and in at least one story (Time Lag) this is used to good effect. The title story is eerily moody, evoking ancient myths on another world in the far future while most of the rest deal with colonisation in a universe where the speed of light is the absolute speed limit and how different worlds might react and change the people that went out to colonise the stars. A very enjoyable read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sara Balthazor

    I was pleasantly surprised - I generally detest science fiction and fantasy because of the poor writing, but this was just charming. It's been a while since I read it, but I remember liking the twisted take on old ideas. I was pleasantly surprised - I generally detest science fiction and fantasy because of the poor writing, but this was just charming. It's been a while since I read it, but I remember liking the twisted take on old ideas.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Spike Anderson

    A fine collection. Some if the stories really are a juxtaposition of Sf and Fant- either...both... Very well written. In general I've been disappointed with the 'best' of last generations writings- but these are good A fine collection. Some if the stories really are a juxtaposition of Sf and Fant- either...both... Very well written. In general I've been disappointed with the 'best' of last generations writings- but these are good

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    I'll put this in SF, though there is some fantasy here too. One of Anderson's best collections of short stories. The title story is actually a novella, and very good. I'll put this in SF, though there is some fantasy here too. One of Anderson's best collections of short stories. The title story is actually a novella, and very good.

  22. 4 out of 5

    SciFiOne

    Short stories

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    I agree with the reviewers who say the first and last stories are the strongest. But they’re all good. It is a very nice slim collection of shorts.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Thannasset

    Gave this a higher rating than I often do to Anderson's work, as he crossed a detective novel with science fiction, and did it well--not a fantasy despite the title...quick read, worth a look. Gave this a higher rating than I often do to Anderson's work, as he crossed a detective novel with science fiction, and did it well--not a fantasy despite the title...quick read, worth a look.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    Awful

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robert Hepple

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peter Brander

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vincent

  29. 5 out of 5

    James

  30. 5 out of 5

    Velimir Kadijević

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.