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How can you become an effective, involved father when you see your baby only briefly after work? What is the best way to start saving for your childGCOs college education? The answers to these questions and hundreds more are found on the pages of this easy-to-follow, information-packed volume. Author Armin Brott devotes a chapter to each month of the first year. In each ch How can you become an effective, involved father when you see your baby only briefly after work? What is the best way to start saving for your childGCOs college education? The answers to these questions and hundreds more are found on the pages of this easy-to-follow, information-packed volume. Author Armin Brott devotes a chapter to each month of the first year. In each chapter he charts the physical, intellectual, verbal, and emotional changes the child is going through, and examines the emotional and psychological development the father may experience. He also covers such general parenting issues as coping with crying, finding quality child care, and understanding changes in the relationship with oneGCOs partner.This new edition features the latest research on many topics, from whatGCOs going on at the hospital right after childbirth to what a dad can do when his partner is having trouble breastfeeding, to advice for dads in the military and others who are separated from their kids. More information on preemies, twins, and triplets has been added, along with advice for divorced and renewed dads. The resources section and bibliography are considerably expanded.Illustrated throughout with New Yorker-style cartoons that underscore the joys and woes of parenting, The New Father is an essential sourcebook for every dad. It is sure to give moms fresh insights as well.


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How can you become an effective, involved father when you see your baby only briefly after work? What is the best way to start saving for your childGCOs college education? The answers to these questions and hundreds more are found on the pages of this easy-to-follow, information-packed volume. Author Armin Brott devotes a chapter to each month of the first year. In each ch How can you become an effective, involved father when you see your baby only briefly after work? What is the best way to start saving for your childGCOs college education? The answers to these questions and hundreds more are found on the pages of this easy-to-follow, information-packed volume. Author Armin Brott devotes a chapter to each month of the first year. In each chapter he charts the physical, intellectual, verbal, and emotional changes the child is going through, and examines the emotional and psychological development the father may experience. He also covers such general parenting issues as coping with crying, finding quality child care, and understanding changes in the relationship with oneGCOs partner.This new edition features the latest research on many topics, from whatGCOs going on at the hospital right after childbirth to what a dad can do when his partner is having trouble breastfeeding, to advice for dads in the military and others who are separated from their kids. More information on preemies, twins, and triplets has been added, along with advice for divorced and renewed dads. The resources section and bibliography are considerably expanded.Illustrated throughout with New Yorker-style cartoons that underscore the joys and woes of parenting, The New Father is an essential sourcebook for every dad. It is sure to give moms fresh insights as well.

30 review for The New Father: A Dad's Guide to the First Year

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I started reading this because someone recommended it to my husband, and so it was lying around. I'm rather grateful to the guy who recommended it. During pregnancy, I bumped up against a number of materials aimed at dads, and was frequently annoyed by them. So many of them seemed condescending to me, acting as if guys are more interested in football and have be to coaxed into learning about their kids. But at the same time, I can see the need--an awful lot of the parenting guides are aimed, whet I started reading this because someone recommended it to my husband, and so it was lying around. I'm rather grateful to the guy who recommended it. During pregnancy, I bumped up against a number of materials aimed at dads, and was frequently annoyed by them. So many of them seemed condescending to me, acting as if guys are more interested in football and have be to coaxed into learning about their kids. But at the same time, I can see the need--an awful lot of the parenting guides are aimed, whether explicitly or just implicitly, at the moms. And I can see how dads would be steadily turned off by their status as a random chapter and a sidebar or two, thrown in as an afterthought. This book fills the gap beautifully, without talking down to anyone. It assumes that guys are just as anxious to be good parents as the women are, and acknowledges that there are a number of ways in which being a dad is different than being a mom. It points out which ones are just trends (dads tend to be more physical with their children on average) that may or may not apply to an individual situation, which differences are biological, and which differences are imposed by society. It encourages fathers to buck the stupid society ones but doesn't sweep the anxieties that many men have under the carpet. There aren't any jokey references to football, as if men can't relate to their infants without elaborate metaphors--there is an assumption that any man reading this book has a genuine desire to bond with his kid and doesn't need to be tricked into it. And the info is great. There are milestones for the infant at the beginning of each chapter, plus notes on what's likely to be going on with mom, with dad's feelings, and with the relationships between all the family members. There are charts of immunizations, reflexes, temperaments, and more. There are suggestions for age-appropriate ways to play with your child, a huge emphasis on reading to kids and on exposing them to different kinds of music, explanations of different kinds of life insurance, discussions of work-life balance and how to find good child care, and more. The tone is friendly and matter-of-fact, the information is thorough and interestingly presented, and the facts all line up with other sources (such as the Mayo Clinic guides). Controversial topics like cosleeping and disposable diapers are treated in an even-handed and non-hysterical manner. In general, I thought it was informative, supportive, and reassuring, without being in the slightest bit condescending. Dads deserve credit and support, and I think this book does an excellent job of providing both.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    A practical guide to a baby’s first year, written for new fathers. Each chapter explains how the baby is developing physically, intellectually, verbally, and emotionally/socially. It then explains what you (the father) are feeling and experiencing. The book’s information and advice are based on academic and clinical research, studies, and expert opinions, as well as anecdotes from the author and his acquaintances. The author includes just the right amount of humor to make it entertaining. The aut A practical guide to a baby’s first year, written for new fathers. Each chapter explains how the baby is developing physically, intellectually, verbally, and emotionally/socially. It then explains what you (the father) are feeling and experiencing. The book’s information and advice are based on academic and clinical research, studies, and expert opinions, as well as anecdotes from the author and his acquaintances. The author includes just the right amount of humor to make it entertaining. The author encourages fathers to as involved as mothers in parenting. He advises adjusting your work schedule to allow for more family time. I read this book because I liked The Expectant Father (my review). Here are the notes I took for each chapter. Although the chapters are divided into months, the information often applies to more than that month. 1 Week • Bathe baby at most 3 times per week, but wash face daily, and everything under diaper at each changing. • For first few weeks, use warm wet washcloths or cotton balls instead of wipes. 1 Month • Only let baby “cry it out” as a last resort. Studies show that responding promptly and lovingly is best. 2 Months • Stop swaddling to allow baby to practice using arms and hands. • Turn water heater down to 120°F to prevent burning baby. • Schedule many daytime naps. Baby shouldn’t be up for more than 1-2 hours at a time. Naps don’t interfere with ability to sleep at night. • Set a regular bedtime around 7pm. • Don’t play with baby when she wakes up at night. Keep it quiet and dark. 3 Months Storing breast milk • Room temperature 8-10 hours • Refrigerator 1 week • Freeze within 48 hours in breast milk bags, for up to 3 months • Thaw in warm water, not microwave • After thawing, refrigerate up to 24 hours, but don’t refreeze • Swirl milk to mix before feeding baby • Don’t borrow breast pumps; they can’t be properly cleaned (except for special rental pumps). • Introduce baby to a bottle by now. • Introduce rattles, keys, and other toys. • Start playing a wide variety of music. • Don’t over- or under-dress baby. Dress her as you dress yourself. Layers are best. • Don’t use sunscreen on baby until 6 months. Keep her out of sun. • To minimize diaper rash, check diapers every few hours and change if even slightly wet. Let baby air out without diaper. Use diaper cream. 4 Months • Don’t be the last thing baby sees before falling asleep, or she’ll always need to see you to fall asleep. • Don’t let baby nap more than 3 hours at a stretch. 5 Months Introducing solid food • Wait until about 6 months to introduce solid food, unless baby is bottle-fed; then, possibly as early as 4 months. Start with a single-grain cereal like oatmeal with breast milk. • Introduce only 1 new food at a time. Wait 3-5 days before introducing another. • 3 days after cereal, start on veggies. Introduce green and yellow, spaced out. • After about a week, introduce non-citrus fruits. • Introduce yogurt after 7 months, then breads, cereals, shredded meats. • At 9 months, introduce mushy finger foods. • No honey or corn sweetener until 1 year old. 7 Months • Clean baby’s teeth daily with washcloth, gauze, or very soft toothbrush. Don’t use toothpaste. • Don’t use string to attach a pacifier to the baby (strangulation risk). Instead, get a clip-on. Avoid using pacifier at bedtime so baby doesn’t wake up when it falls out. • A few soft toys in the crib are OK, but still no pillows or large toys. • Car seats should face backward until baby is at least 1 year and 20 lbs. 9 Months • Blocks are some of the most educational toys. 10 Months • Baby should speak with words between 10 months and 1 year. • Keep playing music to develop musical potential, even though you start to develop her verbal skills. Play music without words so she focuses on music. Sing along with nonsense words. 12 Months • Baby will start to try walking. • Stay calm when stopping bad or dangerous behavior. If you react wildly, baby will repeat the behavior to get you to react again (babies find it amusing). • Start weaning baby off breast milk. • Don’t give cow’s milk until after 1 year. Then, start with whole milk (babies need the fat). • Babies can’t start potty training until 2 years.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Corey Thibodeaux

    The purple bags under your eyes give away the struggle. Your house is now a vessel for toys and collateral damage. You look back on what you endured and, with a single tear sliding down your face, you say, "We did it. We kept the little one from destroying himself." That, my friends, is the first year of parenthood. When you have a child, you are inundated with advice that may or may not work for you. Every child is different. With that being said, it's very difficult to judge any parenting book, The purple bags under your eyes give away the struggle. Your house is now a vessel for toys and collateral damage. You look back on what you endured and, with a single tear sliding down your face, you say, "We did it. We kept the little one from destroying himself." That, my friends, is the first year of parenthood. When you have a child, you are inundated with advice that may or may not work for you. Every child is different. With that being said, it's very difficult to judge any parenting book, but this book got me through the first year all right going beyond raising a child. It's encouraging to know you aren't alone in aspects of feeling helpless as a father in the early stages, navigating new dynamics in your relationships, and dealing with a grandparent's abundance/lack of affection. I'd say for the first year of fatherhood, this is a pretty comprehensive tome and could do a lot of fathers well. Each chapter is divided into the baby's age by month, so I would just read the upcoming month as it comes - no need to rush through this. In doing so, you can focus on what your baby is going through in the moment and analyze his or her needs, as the variables are unique to you and you alone. The year will fly by, so cherish it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David

    I’m going to have to re-read the relevant portions again as the first year was maybe a bit too much to read before the baby is even born in hindsight. But it seems like a great deal of useful information. (Hopefully that will hold true to practical experience. I’ll hopefully remember to update this review if it does or does not live up to those expectations).

  5. 4 out of 5

    David Marino

    This is my second "New Father" book I have read by Armin Brott, and I must say, I'm far more disappointed in this one than I was with "The Expectant Father". The first issue I have with this book is the accuracy of the information. Since this book was written in the 90's (and hasn't had a newer edition since 2004), most of the resources, references, and facts are woefully out of date. For instance, bumpers are considered a "no-no" in cribs these days, but Mr. Brott goes out of his way to recomme This is my second "New Father" book I have read by Armin Brott, and I must say, I'm far more disappointed in this one than I was with "The Expectant Father". The first issue I have with this book is the accuracy of the information. Since this book was written in the 90's (and hasn't had a newer edition since 2004), most of the resources, references, and facts are woefully out of date. For instance, bumpers are considered a "no-no" in cribs these days, but Mr. Brott goes out of his way to recommend them for "active babies". Furthermore, when he does cite "recommended reading", all of the books are a good 15 to 20 years old. This might be fine for some people, but I prefer to make sure most of the information I have is from this century. The second issue I have with this book is the redundancy of information. Not only does he flat out repeat sections of the book, but he also makes it difficult to know where to turn to for definitive material. For instance, he lists recommended books for infants in one chapter, and then he seemingly cites another list of books in the following chapter. This would be fine if one section of books was for newborns and one was for 9 to 12 month olds, but there doesn't seem to be any rhyme or reason why he does this. The third issue I have is more subjective, but it concerns his overall advice. While I appreciate that everyone has different tastes or opinions, I really wonder why he chooses to say some of the things he does. For instance, he mentions "watching porn" to spruce up a couple's sex life. Okay... And then he talks in a later chapter about feelings that may cause "arousal" or "excitement" toward your child. While he quickly goes on to cite several psychiatrists that it is completely normal to feel excited toward your infant son or daughter, I still wonder what his motivation was toward writing things like this -- other than to shock his audience. All in all, a pretty disappointing read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Elyssa

    Another winning book for new fathers by Armin Brott. In this book, he provides guidance on a month-by-month basis for a child's first year of life, including developmental milestones, how the mother is likely feeling, and how the father is feeling. This is written in the spirit of equally shared parenting, which is both rare and refreshing. It was hard for me to find books for fathers that weren't overly humorous or reduced fathers to helpless and clueless caregivers who are advised to just let Another winning book for new fathers by Armin Brott. In this book, he provides guidance on a month-by-month basis for a child's first year of life, including developmental milestones, how the mother is likely feeling, and how the father is feeling. This is written in the spirit of equally shared parenting, which is both rare and refreshing. It was hard for me to find books for fathers that weren't overly humorous or reduced fathers to helpless and clueless caregivers who are advised to just let the mother deal with the children. Armin Brott is an experienced and loving father who clearly knows that all men have the potential to be active parents and role models.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    It's a vastly oversimplified view of child development, e.g. "At 11 months he can operate a spoon pretty well but prefers to use his hands." But, in fact, those long lists of skills and behaviors that kids typically have at each month in their first year of life were what I liked the most. I quickly skimmed the rest of the chapters - which comprise most of the book - and loved reading through those lists. I found that they often helped point out and appreciate behaviors that my daughter was alrea It's a vastly oversimplified view of child development, e.g. "At 11 months he can operate a spoon pretty well but prefers to use his hands." But, in fact, those long lists of skills and behaviors that kids typically have at each month in their first year of life were what I liked the most. I quickly skimmed the rest of the chapters - which comprise most of the book - and loved reading through those lists. I found that they often helped point out and appreciate behaviors that my daughter was already doing. And it was easy to gloss over the ones that she was "behind" on because the format was obviously oversimplified. It's pretty awesome all the changes that happen in a kid's first year of life!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marius

    Amazing book of practical information for fathers. I think Armin should be named as “father of new fathers”. By reading his book you understand that all super crazy thoughts going through your mind while expecting and having a newborn are not stupid, that other people also have doubts, suspisions and weird family situations. Again, practical information month bu month whats happening with the baby, you and your partner is essential. Great material, recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ronny Grethel

    Very extensive coverage of the first year of fatherhood. I'll be referring back to it as my daughter gets older. If you do everything he says to do in this book you might be a tad bit neurotic, but I'm glad I know it all anyway. Very extensive coverage of the first year of fatherhood. I'll be referring back to it as my daughter gets older. If you do everything he says to do in this book you might be a tad bit neurotic, but I'm glad I know it all anyway.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Paletta

    SUPER DETAILED. I was kinda overwhelmed, but was worth the read. Will referencing to this throughout the first year. A little too much information for me right now.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Benson

    I would recommend this book to both fathers and mothers. I read it over the course of 9 months, trying to stay a month or two ahead of my son. As I’ve learned though, every baby is different, and they seem to develop at their own pace. By no means does this book answer all of the questions about parenting a 0-12 month old child. It does, however, provide a basic roadmap of what to expect.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jiwoonglee

    Good to have it around as a first-time father.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Barry

    Wow, this author is the epitome of cheese. He is writing exclusively to men, but I don't know one guy who'd make these kinds of super lame jokes. I'm giving 2 stars because there was some interesting and factual knowledge coming out of the book, but man, those jokes, sprinkled constantly throughout the book had me cringing inside. Hoof, painful. I will not read any more of his books - no way, no how, thanks and goodbye, good riddance. Wow, this author is the epitome of cheese. He is writing exclusively to men, but I don't know one guy who'd make these kinds of super lame jokes. I'm giving 2 stars because there was some interesting and factual knowledge coming out of the book, but man, those jokes, sprinkled constantly throughout the book had me cringing inside. Hoof, painful. I will not read any more of his books - no way, no how, thanks and goodbye, good riddance.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Meade

    I was complimented by one of my wife’s doctors when they saw me reading this in the waiting room for one of her pregnancy appointments. It is a great read for new dads to read every month during their kid’s first year of life. Since Kaity does a TON of research on her own there wasn’t a lot of new information for me. Still, it helped me to know which milestones to expect each month and helped me to be much more informed. We also made it through the first year 🙌

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zeshan Syed

    In my culture, it is unconventional to read a book on parenting. People would joke about such a notion and look at you condescendingly. If you can relate to such a situation, then this book is for you. It is for the curious father who is uncomfortable about asking "silly" questions on parenting for fear of eliciting a sententious response. This book is a combination of a user manual, on fathering, and a self-help book. It is laid out in a structured format that makes it accessible and easy to us In my culture, it is unconventional to read a book on parenting. People would joke about such a notion and look at you condescendingly. If you can relate to such a situation, then this book is for you. It is for the curious father who is uncomfortable about asking "silly" questions on parenting for fear of eliciting a sententious response. This book is a combination of a user manual, on fathering, and a self-help book. It is laid out in a structured format that makes it accessible and easy to use as a reference in the future. The writer conveniently adds humor throughout the book to keep the reader entertained while reading such a dry topic. I highly recommend it to new, and expecting, dads as it contains information with respect to each month of the first infant year. It is replete with a variety of information regarding the baby's physical, mental and emotional health. Almost all the information is intuitive as well as retrospective, backed by adequate research on the subject. Ideally this book should be read cover to cover at once. After that it can act as an indispensable monthly reference material. Each chapter contains a section "What's Going On With The Baby" that lists the monthly milestones which can be used as a yardstick to gauge infant growth and health. It imparts a plethora of advices that would educate the dad and minimize the surprises - don't think for a second that it will contain every minute detail (this is not a pediatric bible), rather it equips the reader with a mindset - he may find down the line. Each chapter contains a section about the health (physical and emotional) of the mother which is instrumental in managing expectations for a couple. Additionally, handy information about miscellaneous stuff (insurance, social security etc) can be found scattered throughout the book. This is by no means a replacement of your pediatrician's advice. It just contains comprehensive information that can save the father a lot of trouble. Most importantly, it inculcates a sense of confidence and optimism.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Just like the previous book by Armin Brott, "The Expectant Father" the strength of this book is giving concise information to help a new father navigate the new bold world of having a baby. He does a good job of giving relevant information that seems to be well researched but not overpowering the reader with too much information. It is a good balance to read through and but there are certainly better resources for reference when you need help on a specific issue. The weakness of the book is more Just like the previous book by Armin Brott, "The Expectant Father" the strength of this book is giving concise information to help a new father navigate the new bold world of having a baby. He does a good job of giving relevant information that seems to be well researched but not overpowering the reader with too much information. It is a good balance to read through and but there are certainly better resources for reference when you need help on a specific issue. The weakness of the book is more about the reader than the book as it is laid out on a timeline of each month for the child. It can be hard to keep up with the reading on the right timeline as I almost never did (either ahead or behind). Overall, I would recommend it and just tell the father not to worry too much about reading each chapter on time but to do it when you can as it is helpful.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chad Walker

    Equally good as his "What to Expect" book, and chock-full of similarly useful information. So why only four stars? The whole idea is kind of preposterous: my hat off to any new parent who can honestly stay awake to make it through the whole thing. Gathers more dust on my night table than the other one did, as I play with my son instead. Still, a great reference. And every 3am session you spend staring into space, head a rising mixture of panic and exhaustion, eyelids heavy like lead, as your chil Equally good as his "What to Expect" book, and chock-full of similarly useful information. So why only four stars? The whole idea is kind of preposterous: my hat off to any new parent who can honestly stay awake to make it through the whole thing. Gathers more dust on my night table than the other one did, as I play with my son instead. Still, a great reference. And every 3am session you spend staring into space, head a rising mixture of panic and exhaustion, eyelids heavy like lead, as your child decides your sleep schedule - just take a reassuring look at its cover and know that at least *somebody* has all the answers. Maybe when he goes off to school I'll actually have time to read them.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hu

    Another parenting book filled with anecdotes that may or may not apply to your kid. Save yourself the time and skip this.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    I finished this book just in time for my daughter's birth (my wife's due date is in 5 days). The book is divided up into chapters for each month of a baby's first year of life (including the 12th month). My plan is to go back and re-read the upcoming month along with my daughter's aging to refresh the knowledge I gained from reading this book. While I was reading this book, I made more than 150 highlights; which I'm assuming also includes bookmarks as I made quite a few of those as well. This boo I finished this book just in time for my daughter's birth (my wife's due date is in 5 days). The book is divided up into chapters for each month of a baby's first year of life (including the 12th month). My plan is to go back and re-read the upcoming month along with my daughter's aging to refresh the knowledge I gained from reading this book. While I was reading this book, I made more than 150 highlights; which I'm assuming also includes bookmarks as I made quite a few of those as well. This book is quite dense with information that seems like it will be valuable and necessary for the upcoming year. Although I am probably in the majority of people reading this book (non-military dad raising a kid with a wife / partner who live together), there were relatively few parts that I felt I could skip over because they don't really apply. For example, there are some blurbs about introducing your baby to other kids (she's our first), and being deployed overseas (not military). I felt myself quoting a lot to my wife both while I was reading and not. Although it felt like I didn't retain much while I was actually reading, apparently a lot was retained as I was telling my wife things later on that she didn't know and was surprised to find out. The book is also a relatively easy read, despite being relatively dense with information. I was generally able to read a chapter every night before bed and didn't feel like it was a major undertaking. Brott does a good job with throwing in some humor and keeping things lighthearted. There were many things that I quoted to my wife just because I found them so humorous. I read this book after reading Brott's "Expectant Father" book because I enjoyed that one so much. I did not enjoy reading this book as much as the "Expectant Father". It's great that he crammed a lot more information into this book, and it's probably necessary, but a lot of the humor and enjoyment I got from reading the previous book was lost on this one. The "Expectant Father" I enjoyed reading, and would almost recommend reading to a non-expectant father just because it was enjoyable to read. With this book, that definitely wasn't the case. It probably is because there isn't as much information that is needed during the pregnancy, I view it as a much more passive experience. I didn't feel a really big need to go back and reread chapters from the previous book like I do with this book. It seems like this book is a lot more teaching than entertaining compared to the previous book. I enjoyed reading this book, and will definitely go back and re-read and use as a reference, however I wish that I had picked a book that was more entertaining and a better read to make the experience more enjoyable. Then again, this is the only book I have read on parenting newborns, so perhaps there isn't another book that is more entertaining. Either way, just a couple more days and I'll be able to book this book into practice!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

    There is so much excellent information in this book. My wife even found parts of it I shared with her very interesting - some is universal to all parents, but she also enjoyed the dad-specific parts as it’s interesting to gain some insight into the other partner’s perspective. There are a couple areas for improvement in this book, however: 1. Each “month-specific” chapter, after the actually month-specific “what’s going on with the baby” and “what’s going on with you” intros, is filled with infor There is so much excellent information in this book. My wife even found parts of it I shared with her very interesting - some is universal to all parents, but she also enjoyed the dad-specific parts as it’s interesting to gain some insight into the other partner’s perspective. There are a couple areas for improvement in this book, however: 1. Each “month-specific” chapter, after the actually month-specific “what’s going on with the baby” and “what’s going on with you” intros, is filled with information that is generally applicable to the whole first year. I would think “there’s no point listening to the 6th month chapter, I’m only in month 5”, but later I would find that chapter contained important information I wish I had known even in the first month. I would much prefer that the book was reorganized to put all the general info at the beginning, and leave the small amount of actually month-specific items to the end. Meanwhile, if you get this book, I really recommend going through the whole thing even if you’re only in your first month - or even before the birth! 2. The month-specific stuff is written authoritatively like “this month your baby is doing X, Y, and Z.” The thing is, there’s no such thing as a definite month-by-month schedule of what your baby WILL do! They will do some things sooner, some later, and some maybe not at all! It’s disheartening, as a parent already full of worries, to hear “this month your baby is running marathons, tap-dancing, and engaging in political debates with top academics”, and thinking “but my baby can only say mama and still isn’t eating reliably”. It should really be re-worded to say “this month about 63% of babies can do X, but many will acquire this skill 2-3 months earlier or later.” Meanwhile, do yourself a favour and look up some info on the typical windows for developing different skills, and at what point not having a particular skill is actually of any concern. 3. Last, it would be better if the chapters in the audiobook were labelled with their chapter headings as well as numbered. If I want to refer back or forward to something, a chapter title like “Chapter 11” is useless.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew King

    I started reading this book a couple of weeks before my daughter was born and zoomed through the first five months. It had some great information that genuinely helped me feel more prepared and helped me out at the beginning. However, zooming through it that quickly, I forgot the information I had read about each month by the time my daughter was that age. I went back and read each month's chapter on a month-to-month basis so I would be well informed in a more timely manner. By the time I reache I started reading this book a couple of weeks before my daughter was born and zoomed through the first five months. It had some great information that genuinely helped me feel more prepared and helped me out at the beginning. However, zooming through it that quickly, I forgot the information I had read about each month by the time my daughter was that age. I went back and read each month's chapter on a month-to-month basis so I would be well informed in a more timely manner. By the time I reached month 6 and 7 I felt like I had gotten the hang of things and didn't feel like it was necessary to finish the book. Most of the information in the book is stuff I had already come across with visits to the pediatrician, etc. Overall, it's a great book with some nice comic relief every few pages. The information in the book is good, and you'll likely hear it from other reputable sources. My reading strategy simply caused me to grow tired of it, but I would recommend this book to other soon to be dad's.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Branimir

    After reading "The Expectant Father: Facts, Tips and Advice for Dads-to-Be" by Armin Brott, I wanted to get some hands-on tips in advance for the period after the birth of the baby. So I logically took his next book (good marketing!) This book was much more informative than the first one, to a level where, at some point, it becomes a bit boring. Nevertheless, I read it through hoping that I will find magic tricks to make a baby interact with you in no time...Right...but it still takes time, as it After reading "The Expectant Father: Facts, Tips and Advice for Dads-to-Be" by Armin Brott, I wanted to get some hands-on tips in advance for the period after the birth of the baby. So I logically took his next book (good marketing!) This book was much more informative than the first one, to a level where, at some point, it becomes a bit boring. Nevertheless, I read it through hoping that I will find magic tricks to make a baby interact with you in no time...Right...but it still takes time, as it seems :) The author goes in great depths on what you may expect at the twelve months after the birth of a kid. I would say this is a useful parenting guide and can be read by both men and women without a problem. He reviews again the changes in the family, as well as what would help a baby develop better - month-over-month.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Damm

    This book is one of the better examples of books written for new fathers. It is informative, well-written, and (most importantly) not stupid. So many are written to some imagined "Dude Bro". Just the covers and blurbs for most of this genre turned me off (patronizing and condescending, etc.). It's well organized, with chapters for each month of the first year (the first few chapters cover shorter periods). It covers what is going on with the partner/mother, and what the fathers-to-be are generall This book is one of the better examples of books written for new fathers. It is informative, well-written, and (most importantly) not stupid. So many are written to some imagined "Dude Bro". Just the covers and blurbs for most of this genre turned me off (patronizing and condescending, etc.). It's well organized, with chapters for each month of the first year (the first few chapters cover shorter periods). It covers what is going on with the partner/mother, and what the fathers-to-be are generally feeling, and gives good advice. The chapters work well. I needed the guidance/support/reassurance more in the early months, and by the end I'd stopped looking because at a year I more or less had it down.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Peter Knox

    Like the previous, The Expectant Father, this guide takes you month by month through the first year of the baby's life. That's an extremely helpful template/pace, as you're overwhelmed by everything else but you're slowly learning alongside your child exactly what you need to know. I especially appreciated the quiz in the middle to help determine how easy/challenging your child is with certain behaviors as well as the section on introducing foods. Dads, there's lots of guides out there but this Like the previous, The Expectant Father, this guide takes you month by month through the first year of the baby's life. That's an extremely helpful template/pace, as you're overwhelmed by everything else but you're slowly learning alongside your child exactly what you need to know. I especially appreciated the quiz in the middle to help determine how easy/challenging your child is with certain behaviors as well as the section on introducing foods. Dads, there's lots of guides out there but this one is helpful and accessible and shows how life develops with you, your partner, and your baby.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kumar

    I have been following along this book over the last year. Each chapter tells me what I can expect the next month in the development of my baby and how can I be ready for it. It has definitely made me sound more intelligent and engaged in child rearing to my wife, when I can suggest solutions to problems that she has been facing or can expect to face. It also allowed me to develop my own opinions on developmental issues - again handy when these opinions are requested by my wife. Strongly recommen I have been following along this book over the last year. Each chapter tells me what I can expect the next month in the development of my baby and how can I be ready for it. It has definitely made me sound more intelligent and engaged in child rearing to my wife, when I can suggest solutions to problems that she has been facing or can expect to face. It also allowed me to develop my own opinions on developmental issues - again handy when these opinions are requested by my wife. Strongly recommend it to first-time dads!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Scott Kuyken

    I read the expectant father and really liked it, so I figured I move right onto the New Father. Whereas a book like Baby 411 gives you all the nuts and bolts of keeping your baby alive and thriving, this lets you deal with what's going on the insides. The emotions and thoughts of you and the baby. It also gives you a lot of good practical nuts and bolts in a more streamlined way than the 411. I would highly recommend it, and within half an hour of finishing it, I've already bought the next book I read the expectant father and really liked it, so I figured I move right onto the New Father. Whereas a book like Baby 411 gives you all the nuts and bolts of keeping your baby alive and thriving, this lets you deal with what's going on the insides. The emotions and thoughts of you and the baby. It also gives you a lot of good practical nuts and bolts in a more streamlined way than the 411. I would highly recommend it, and within half an hour of finishing it, I've already bought the next book in the series, Fathering your Toddler.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    250 pages of filler, 80 pages of pure gold. I see that I dog-eared five pages over the course of nearly a year of incremental reading: - Week 1: the six behavioral states of an hours-old baby (quiet alert, active alert, crying, drowsiness, quiet sleep, active sleep) - Month 1: reflexes (Moro, Babinski, etc.) - Month 5: most/least problematic solid foods + when to introduce them - Month 6: questions to ask when interviewing a potential in-home caretaker - Month 9: activities to stimulate hand-eye coo 250 pages of filler, 80 pages of pure gold. I see that I dog-eared five pages over the course of nearly a year of incremental reading: - Week 1: the six behavioral states of an hours-old baby (quiet alert, active alert, crying, drowsiness, quiet sleep, active sleep) - Month 1: reflexes (Moro, Babinski, etc.) - Month 5: most/least problematic solid foods + when to introduce them - Month 6: questions to ask when interviewing a potential in-home caretaker - Month 9: activities to stimulate hand-eye coordination (nesting and stacking, pouring, etc.)Let the adventure continue!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Martins Mikelsons

    A great book! Helpful, well written and with a lot of funny comments. However, the main thing that I didn't like was that it often makes you feel bad if your kid is not doing some of the things that the author is mentioning as a must for the current month. And no comments about kids developing in different ways and in a different pace than others. Another minor issue with it was that many chapters of it is strictly oriented for USA with addreses and phone numbers of specialists and so on, which is A great book! Helpful, well written and with a lot of funny comments. However, the main thing that I didn't like was that it often makes you feel bad if your kid is not doing some of the things that the author is mentioning as a must for the current month. And no comments about kids developing in different ways and in a different pace than others. Another minor issue with it was that many chapters of it is strictly oriented for USA with addreses and phone numbers of specialists and so on, which is fine I guess..

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jon Clemons

    A bit too high level for what I was looking for. Would have enjoyed more info on the micro such as baths and a detail that eases my concerns such as why babies hiccup so often. All in all it's not bad. Just not what I was hoping for. The great part of this book is it goes over periods of life from the perspective of the mother, the baby and the father. It starts a bit late. Would have enjoyed more prebirth content. Not a bad read. Not a slow read. Just nothing amazing. A bit too high level for what I was looking for. Would have enjoyed more info on the micro such as baths and a detail that eases my concerns such as why babies hiccup so often. All in all it's not bad. Just not what I was hoping for. The great part of this book is it goes over periods of life from the perspective of the mother, the baby and the father. It starts a bit late. Would have enjoyed more prebirth content. Not a bad read. Not a slow read. Just nothing amazing.

  30. 4 out of 5

    MacK

    Like any first time parent, I needed as much help as I could get. I wouldn't say that this book gave me everything I needed to be a world class dad, it did do a great job of helping me mentally prepare. Even now after the first year is done it's telling how some lessons are ingrained in my brain (particularly diaper systems and napping supports). Ultimately, you learn most by trying, failing and trying again. But to prepare you mentally, if not practically, this book is quite valuable. Like any first time parent, I needed as much help as I could get. I wouldn't say that this book gave me everything I needed to be a world class dad, it did do a great job of helping me mentally prepare. Even now after the first year is done it's telling how some lessons are ingrained in my brain (particularly diaper systems and napping supports). Ultimately, you learn most by trying, failing and trying again. But to prepare you mentally, if not practically, this book is quite valuable.

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