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The Liberating Truth: How the Gospel of Christ Empowers and Liberates Women

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"Danielle Strickland contends that women everywhere remain subjugated by cultural norms that tell them to conform, hold back, and turn aside from God's call upon their lives. Consequently many women fail to play a full part in the healing and restoration of society. The church should take the lead. In this prophetic book Danielle observes: "We should be the ones who model "Danielle Strickland contends that women everywhere remain subjugated by cultural norms that tell them to conform, hold back, and turn aside from God's call upon their lives. Consequently many women fail to play a full part in the healing and restoration of society. The church should take the lead. In this prophetic book Danielle observes: "We should be the ones who model an alternative approach to leadership. We are the ones with the Bible and the witness of the Holy Spirit who through Scripture, reason, tradition and experience has shown, over and over again His heart for the release of women to exercise their gifts." The book covers: The current situation (exploitation or subjugation); the historical situation (feminism and the Christian tradition); key biblical material; justice (the feminization of poverty); what does the future offer, and what should the church do?"


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"Danielle Strickland contends that women everywhere remain subjugated by cultural norms that tell them to conform, hold back, and turn aside from God's call upon their lives. Consequently many women fail to play a full part in the healing and restoration of society. The church should take the lead. In this prophetic book Danielle observes: "We should be the ones who model "Danielle Strickland contends that women everywhere remain subjugated by cultural norms that tell them to conform, hold back, and turn aside from God's call upon their lives. Consequently many women fail to play a full part in the healing and restoration of society. The church should take the lead. In this prophetic book Danielle observes: "We should be the ones who model an alternative approach to leadership. We are the ones with the Bible and the witness of the Holy Spirit who through Scripture, reason, tradition and experience has shown, over and over again His heart for the release of women to exercise their gifts." The book covers: The current situation (exploitation or subjugation); the historical situation (feminism and the Christian tradition); key biblical material; justice (the feminization of poverty); what does the future offer, and what should the church do?"

30 review for The Liberating Truth: How the Gospel of Christ Empowers and Liberates Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Peyton Williams

    It is so healing to read a book about something that I know deeply to be true: God cares about the empowerment and liberation of women. Whether it is freeing a woman from physical abuse and oppression or enabling a woman to use her full spiritual gifts and abilities to lead and aid the body of Christ, God is so for it. He cares for women, sees us as equally valid and capable members of His church. In her book, Strickland address the need to protect, champion, and amplify the persons and voices o It is so healing to read a book about something that I know deeply to be true: God cares about the empowerment and liberation of women. Whether it is freeing a woman from physical abuse and oppression or enabling a woman to use her full spiritual gifts and abilities to lead and aid the body of Christ, God is so for it. He cares for women, sees us as equally valid and capable members of His church. In her book, Strickland address the need to protect, champion, and amplify the persons and voices of women not just because it may align with our political leanings but because it aligns with the heart and desire of the Father. She begins at the global level (which I much appreciate), acknowledging the oppression of women on a larger scale beyond the hurt of the white, American woman. It’s refreshing and a much needed inclusion to the book. Then, she delves into how Jesus empowered women in his ministry. Furthermore, she addresses head on those Pauline passages and their troublesome interpretations that have shaped the church’s view on women for many years. All of it points to a God that desires for women to not only have a spot at the table, but a place in the pulpit and equal footing alongside their male counterparts. My only complaint: I wish it were longer. :) It’s only 155 pages! I think there is some value in how short the book is so as not to overwhelm some readers with what might be a potentially radical viewpoint change, although its brevity came across as insufficiency at times. Perhaps it’s just me wanting to read more and have a lot of references and research to beef up certain points, but it just felt a bit quick at times. It certainly does pack a punch for how few pages there are, which only leads me to believe there could be more to say. Overall, as I said, I found the book to be refreshing and an encouragement (if only a bit too short)!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Davey

    An absolutely incredible, bible based book packed full of practical teaching and debunking of patriarchal myth within the church and her structure.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    A great discussion about the multi-faceted liberation of women, especially in the church

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    The Liberating Truth How Jesus Empowers Women By Danielle Strickland I was thrilled when I received this book from Library Thing. First of all I consider myself a Fundamentalist and an Evangelical. I say that because I also believe my Pastor is fantastic and I’m thrilled that SHE is my Pastor. I loved the book. Ms Strickland’s writing style is practical and appreciated I followed her instruction and feel more informed in reading her book. An example I enjoyed: “In our current culture, the sex indus The Liberating Truth How Jesus Empowers Women By Danielle Strickland I was thrilled when I received this book from Library Thing. First of all I consider myself a Fundamentalist and an Evangelical. I say that because I also believe my Pastor is fantastic and I’m thrilled that SHE is my Pastor. I loved the book. Ms Strickland’s writing style is practical and appreciated I followed her instruction and feel more informed in reading her book. An example I enjoyed: “In our current culture, the sex industry has hijacked the name of “womens’ rights.” They heap argument upon argument to bolster the myth that violence and sexual abuse, which are the harsh realities at the heart of prostitution, are actually liberating. That’s sick.” (pg 42) Yeah, I can follow that no problem. I believe women are fit for the pulpit and leadership and that gender dictated churches are not fundamentally correct and hamper the evangelical purpose of spreading the gospel. I believe that whole heartedly and I still believe that after reading this book. But Ms. Strickland and I did lengthen in thought a few times. Until page 89 Ms Strickland and I were on the same wave length, I was a student at her feet and pounded the proverbial wooden table top to applaud her teaching and her gumption. And then it happened. Translation nit picking. Oh how I hate the translation nit picking. Why? Because it only feeds the fire of those men who want to keep women under their thumbs. Going on the offensive with thick skulls is admitting defeat. Let’s face it, if they read the book of Esther and think, nice story, it’s time to shake the dust from our shoes. If they read in the gospel that on resurrection morning our Savior had to tell a WOMAN to go and tell His brothers to meet Him…well then I don’t think translations will get through. Now I understand we have to stand up and say enough is enough. We have to instill in our daughters that they are not less than a male they are equal, with equal gifts and equal responsibilities. Any way back to page 89. The Author sites a story written by Don Richardson in 2010. It seems the translators of the King James Bible watered down a translation - the word “andrapodisters,” meaning slave trader to kidnappers. Slave traders were part of a list that were “among those whom God’s law reproves.” Now the story goes on to say that if the word “slave trader,” had really been placed in the Bible rather than “kidnappers,” perhaps all the suffering of the European slave trade and the American Civil War may have been thwarted. Yeah, just like those very straight 10 commandments stopping the atrocities of the world. I particularly like the one about, adultery or false witness, and murder, that’s a good one too. God made it perfectly clear regarding His law. Jesus had to come and die for us anyway. So really, that is just plain and simple wishful thinking. It is really like believing that the US Civil War really wasn’t about slavery but about state’s rights. Now the book is excellent past this point but unfortunately I was less trusting. So when the usual scriptures come about “women should remain silent in the church,” I start to cringe. Fine, women, be silent but all you Pastor, Prophets, Evangelists, Apostles, Teachers and Singers, if you remain silent then may the rocks truly rise up and sing praises to God. Women, Men, Young, Old, does not matter, if God touches start talking. I know the frustration. I have friends (no really I have a few) who are liberated, speak in tongues and their husbands adore them. I have a few others who look at their husbands as if asking permission to speak – I want to SCREAM when that happens but screaming will only drive those women away from me. I tell you what, I have more women talking to me about submission than men. We are our own worst enemy. Frankly when I’m accosted (and I do mean accosted) by fellow “Christians,” regarding my stand on women’s rights to teach and pastor I simply ask those accusing me of non-fundamental thinking if they can tell me how God directs their life? I believe my Savior washed the feet of His disciples. I believe when Peter refused to allow Him to wash his feet, thinking that as Lord of the Universe Jesus had no business washing dirty feet. I believe that Peter was a tough nut to crack but when Christ said then that he was not worthy of the Kingdom of God, then I believe that Peter said, then Lord, wash all of me. We all need to be washed and washed again with a little humility. Thanks Ms Strikland for your book, it is truly needed and every woman in the world needs to read it. We need to be reminded who we are and our possibilities in Christ. Thank you again.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This book was hard for me to read but given that I’ll give you my opinion and let you decide if you should read it. It was a very quick read in that it was short and to the point however I found myself disagreeing with the author, Danielle Strickland. Let me begin by saying that I think slavery is wrong, whether it’s because of race, religion, gender, etc, it’s wrong and it goes against God’s Law for mankind. The author give quite a few examples of women who are being held captive either because This book was hard for me to read but given that I’ll give you my opinion and let you decide if you should read it. It was a very quick read in that it was short and to the point however I found myself disagreeing with the author, Danielle Strickland. Let me begin by saying that I think slavery is wrong, whether it’s because of race, religion, gender, etc, it’s wrong and it goes against God’s Law for mankind. The author give quite a few examples of women who are being held captive either because of society’s view on them (such as in prostitution) or because they are literally being held against their will. I agree that is wrong however her points made against Biblical womanhood and manhood seem to be in the opposite direction of the Bible. One example of this is that we Christian women believe we are subservient because we’ve been told by pastors, dads, husbands, etc that we are different. I was made female and I am different and yes I should have different roles within the community, home and even the church. There is much more in this book such as the author wondering why women have to take their husband’s name, why can’t the husband take the woman’s maiden name? Why should a bride be given away because that implies ownership. Even telling the reader that Jesus was a feminist because He welcomed women into His inner circle, He chose to appear first to a woman and have her relay the message He had rose from the dead – does that make Him a feminist? No. She outlines three views of women and our position in society 1) patriarchy which she calls the “old fashioned, nuts view”, 2) complementarian which is where persons are equal in personhood but hold different roles and 3) egalitarianism which is where both men and woman have equal authority and responsibility in marriage, church and community. I must say I think the author would view me as unliberated and controlled mind, body and soul by my husband. This is simply untrue and I cannot say that the Bible means one thing and discard the rest. I’m liberated and I can’t say that I’ve ever loved my life more as a homemaker, wife, mom and home educator. My husband doesn’t demean me or speak for me – we discuss things and we both have our own opinions. I used to be a die hard feminist and can’t ever think I’d turn back to that lifestyle. I also can’t help but feel a little saddened that I would be lumped together with women who truly are treated as trash as those in Iraq or prostitutes. While I learned a lot about how some may think that Jesus was a feminist I think that is trying to put Jesus into a box that He doesn’t belong in and one that mere humans shouldn’t try to make Him fit. Yes, He broke society’s norms but feminism tore down what was good and right for the family and society. I want to make it clear that I’m not wanting to disparage this author but I also can’t agree with something that even though she says is backed up Scripturally, seems to go against Scripture all together. You’ll have to make your choice if you think this is a book that you’d like to read. **I was provided a copy of this book from Kregel Publications for the blog tour in exchange for my honest opinion, positive or negative, no other compensation was given.

  6. 4 out of 5

    The Loopy Librarian

    The Liberating Truth is a well-written, well-researched and passionate argument for the rights of women to have true equality with men, especially when it comes to serving in the church. The author, a major in The Salvation Army in Canada, writes from her own personal experiences of working with women in all countries who have been oppressed. Some of the stories she tells are especially heartbreaking. I'm not a theologian, but I don't necessarily agree with all of Strickland's interpretations of The Liberating Truth is a well-written, well-researched and passionate argument for the rights of women to have true equality with men, especially when it comes to serving in the church. The author, a major in The Salvation Army in Canada, writes from her own personal experiences of working with women in all countries who have been oppressed. Some of the stories she tells are especially heartbreaking. I'm not a theologian, but I don't necessarily agree with all of Strickland's interpretations of the Bible. I am a Southern Baptist, and we don't allow women in the pulpit based on some of the same scripture that she cited but interpreted differently. I'm also what she termed a "complementarian." I believe that men and women are equal in value but designed to serve different roles in the church and in marriage. Nevertheless, I felt the author's frustration about not being able to preach or pastor in some places, as is her calling, because of some of these very same church views that I have spent the last twenty years building my life around. One book, however, passionate, is not going to change my mind, but it definitely left me with a lot to think about. There are denominations that accept women as pastors, and that's a good thing. Just because I'm uncomfortable with a woman pastor doesn't mean I'm right. It could just be that I'm clinging to what I've been taught because it's what I'm comfortable with. I do believe she was right about Jesus. He believed in the rights of women. I hesitate to say, as the author did, that Jesus was a feminist. Not because he wasn't but because there are such negative connotations associated with that word today. But the Biblical evidence she presents is compelling. Jesus spent time with women; he talked with women; he taught women the Word at a time and in a culture where this was unheard of. He loved women and still does. Strickland says women are not princesses and what she meant was that we are strong and independent and not meant to be arm candy for some knight in shining armor. But, I believe that I AM a princess, a very empowered one, because Jesus is my King. The Liberating Truth will make you rethink the roles of women. It will make you angry that women are still oppressed, even in the church. Strickland sometimes lets her frustrations override her arguments, but for the most part she uses clear evidence, biblical citations, experience, and undeniable Truth to make her points. And she does it well. As I said, she left me with a lot to think about.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Johnson

    When I first saw this title, I wanted to see if the author was putting forth a certain premise. So much happens in our society today to which we need to pay attention. The author makes the plight of abuse towards women as wrong in her book, which I agree with. Secondly, the author brings forth how women as well as young girls are sold into prostitution, abuse, denied the basic needs for living and so much more. None of this do I disagree with. As members of the Body we need to bring these women When I first saw this title, I wanted to see if the author was putting forth a certain premise. So much happens in our society today to which we need to pay attention. The author makes the plight of abuse towards women as wrong in her book, which I agree with. Secondly, the author brings forth how women as well as young girls are sold into prostitution, abuse, denied the basic needs for living and so much more. None of this do I disagree with. As members of the Body we need to bring these women out of such lives and into a life filled with all that Jesus has to give to them. Unless one is rooted deeply in the Word, I would not recommend this book. Yes, the Body still needs to deal with her sins, seeing them as Jesus sees them. Yes, the Body shouldn’t excuse or deny the wrong inflicted against women, as they are made in the image of God. No one should be treated disrespectfully or abusively. Why? All of us are made in the image of God that is why. The Body does need to love each other as Jesus loves her because that will draw them to Him, not just to a religious establishment. However, in many areas of this book, I disagree with the conclusions the author was drawing. Women can find fulfillment in their God-given roles without stripping men of theirs. Men and women are co-heirs with Christ. Christ showed all of mankind that women are people too, nothing less than that. The author however quotes other men and women authors to establish a very mistaken view. I hold nothing against the author as a person, yet her conclusions and call to what she believes is the right action I find to be non-biblical. There is such dignity and value that God bestows upon women that they will find so satisfying if they operate within that calling, letting the men carry what God has called them to carry. The author alludes to conclusions others make about a section of Scripture without giving or making notation of where the conclusions are found so a reader may locate the source, read and see if the author is drawing proper conclusions. I could go on and on as the author did in her book, with one exception. I would quote more of the whole counsel of God and leave out the conclusions of others. Scripture speaks and supports itself. I would highly recommend reading faithfully His Word, and for yourself see what He has to say. It is His Truth that will set all mankind free, indeed. My Blog: http://seekingwithallyurheart.blogspo...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Victor Gentile

    Danielle Strickland in her new book “The Liberating Truth" published by Kregel Publications explores How Jesus Empowers Women. Suppose we were able to take a camera crew and take to the city streets going about asking just one question: are women treated equally and fairly in our society? What do you think our results would be? My opinion is the answers we would receive would be yes. People would feel that women won the right to vote, the right to work and even the right to govern so the answer i Danielle Strickland in her new book “The Liberating Truth" published by Kregel Publications explores How Jesus Empowers Women. Suppose we were able to take a camera crew and take to the city streets going about asking just one question: are women treated equally and fairly in our society? What do you think our results would be? My opinion is the answers we would receive would be yes. People would feel that women won the right to vote, the right to work and even the right to govern so the answer is yes. Ms. Strickland disagrees. According to her findings as she has traveled the globe women are still treated as inferior physically and mentally and have sex used against them over and over. Not only does that happen in the world but Ms. Strickland feels that it also carries over into the Church "The Liberating Truth" is divided into two parts: Part One provides the evidence that shows how women are unfairly treated and Part Two provides "What The Bible Says". Do I agree with everything that Ms. Strickland has to say? No. Does Ms. Strickland provide a lot to think about? Yes. Are there many things that need to be changed? Yes. "The Liberating Truth" will certainly keep you thinking. If you would like to listen to interviews with other authors and professionals please go to www.kingdomhighlights.org where they are available On Demand. To listen to 24 hours non-stop Christian music please visit our internet radio station http://www.kingdomairwaves.org Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Kregel Publications. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  9. 4 out of 5

    D.S. White

    My Thoughts: I chose this book based on the title and the promise implied: truth, liberation and empowerment. In the back of my mind was the thought that it might have a feminist agenda, which I do back flips to avoid reading but I chose the book anyway. As I read Danielle’s pain and frustration at situations experienced, personally and secondhand via the stories of women she encountered personally or read about was tangible. I can imagine that a life’s work of research and instituting programs to My Thoughts: I chose this book based on the title and the promise implied: truth, liberation and empowerment. In the back of my mind was the thought that it might have a feminist agenda, which I do back flips to avoid reading but I chose the book anyway. As I read Danielle’s pain and frustration at situations experienced, personally and secondhand via the stories of women she encountered personally or read about was tangible. I can imagine that a life’s work of research and instituting programs to empower women while encountering the same stories of abuse, abandonment or neglect over and over again would engender the need to do something, say something to alert society to the silent unanswered cries of women all over the world. Different women, different cultures, same abuse. After reading, I can say there is truth in it with regards to abuse women suffer in and out of the church due to small minds, society turning a blind eye and inaccurate theology, however, I felt neither liberated nor empowered. Despite that, there are some good points: * The author’s love for God is clear and prevalent * The book is a quick read * The first half of the book gives lots of interesting statistics * The back of the book gives brief biographies of many fascinating women * This book is a good conversation starter referencing how we apply God’s principles in today’s society I gave this book 2-1/2 stars Since I disagree with much of the theology, I would be hesitant to recommend this book to others, especially a young Christian who has not had time be discipled.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gerard Kelly

    Danielle Strickland pulls no punches in the exploration of faith and gender. A renowned activist in the Salvation Army, Strickland has pursued her own life on the assumption that God does not discriminate by gender, and here she shares that view with passion, colour and determination. She is a very successful public speaker, and that comes across here, as she weaves together research, story and polemic to deliver an apologetic for the liberation of women. I for one found it both persuasive and a Danielle Strickland pulls no punches in the exploration of faith and gender. A renowned activist in the Salvation Army, Strickland has pursued her own life on the assumption that God does not discriminate by gender, and here she shares that view with passion, colour and determination. She is a very successful public speaker, and that comes across here, as she weaves together research, story and polemic to deliver an apologetic for the liberation of women. I for one found it both persuasive and a pleasure to read. Knowing that the author has committed so much of her life to working with vulnerable women and men, so often deeply damaged by the assumptions and prejudices of their culture, brought a richness to this text. In the end, this is not a book about gender as such. It is about God's desire for every human being to freely embrace the potential and possibilities they were created for. All people have beauty and purpose, and Danielle Strickland here reminds us no arbitrary divisions of humanity can erase that fact.

  11. 4 out of 5

    J

    I received this book through the GoodReads First Reads Giveaway program. While I am not an Evangelical Christian, I found Strickland's introduction of modern church culture as a form of female oppression (by way of defined gender roles, expectations of beauty and home perfection, etc...) quite interesting. She goes on to examine other forms of oppression (hijab, prostitution). In the second part of the book she attempts to discuss Biblical stances on women, and how translations may affect our un I received this book through the GoodReads First Reads Giveaway program. While I am not an Evangelical Christian, I found Strickland's introduction of modern church culture as a form of female oppression (by way of defined gender roles, expectations of beauty and home perfection, etc...) quite interesting. She goes on to examine other forms of oppression (hijab, prostitution). In the second part of the book she attempts to discuss Biblical stances on women, and how translations may affect our understanding. While Strickland did cover how Jesus and the Holy Spirit were "pro-female" she never goes so far as to detail HOW Jesus empowers women (beyond some biblical quotes). This volume was readable, but given the mass-market appeal I felt that she just brushed the surface with some of her arguments.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susie Hall

    Strickland. Danielle, (1998)The Liberating Truth, Monarch Books, Lion Hudson Plc, Oxford. Brilliant book for breaking free from the control of man over women, which has hovered over many lives. Danielle Strickland has studied the bible and she takes women back to the beginning and shares how many passages of the word have been distorted over the years. She brings to light the joy for women to be released into their ministries freely and without the pressure of being controlled by male dominance, b Strickland. Danielle, (1998)The Liberating Truth, Monarch Books, Lion Hudson Plc, Oxford. Brilliant book for breaking free from the control of man over women, which has hovered over many lives. Danielle Strickland has studied the bible and she takes women back to the beginning and shares how many passages of the word have been distorted over the years. She brings to light the joy for women to be released into their ministries freely and without the pressure of being controlled by male dominance, but in the blessings of Jesus over each and every woman's life. A good read for all women and as they do read it, they would only find that they are released into an new understanding of the freedom each of us as women do have in the Lord.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Helen Maltby

    This is an incredible book. I was lucky enough to hear Danielle speak at Spring Harvest last week and she really is inspirational. This book makes the point that in order to understand the portrayal of women in the Bible we really need to understand the context surrounding the gospels and the epistles. When we do this we can see how revolutionary Jesus' treatment of women was and that the status he afforded them was far higher than the society at the time did. A must read for both sexes who are co This is an incredible book. I was lucky enough to hear Danielle speak at Spring Harvest last week and she really is inspirational. This book makes the point that in order to understand the portrayal of women in the Bible we really need to understand the context surrounding the gospels and the epistles. When we do this we can see how revolutionary Jesus' treatment of women was and that the status he afforded them was far higher than the society at the time did. A must read for both sexes who are concerned about the current debate in the Church surrounding the role of women in leadership.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    It's to be expected for this book to have some very negative reviews just because of its topic. The arguments in this book are well laid out and backed up with bible verses. She actually gives them in brackets, so you are able to look up the texts yourself. Yes, sometimes it is highly concerned with exegesis and sometimes (even though I agree with her argument) I have found some parts not entirely convincing. But overall, this gives a good first insight into the topic of how Jesus created an envi It's to be expected for this book to have some very negative reviews just because of its topic. The arguments in this book are well laid out and backed up with bible verses. She actually gives them in brackets, so you are able to look up the texts yourself. Yes, sometimes it is highly concerned with exegesis and sometimes (even though I agree with her argument) I have found some parts not entirely convincing. But overall, this gives a good first insight into the topic of how Jesus created an environment that was supposed to empower women instead of putting them on the silent step.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bexxi

    The book is split into two parts, focusing first on the oppression of women throughout all society; from Burquas to Botox to Barbies, and then moves onto look at the Biblical stance on women and equality. Danielle Strickland looks at the passages that have caused issues within the church, how these issues arose, and helps debunk the myths about women in the church. This book was an amazing read and I could not put it down. Everything in this book rang true for me and I've discovered a passion I d The book is split into two parts, focusing first on the oppression of women throughout all society; from Burquas to Botox to Barbies, and then moves onto look at the Biblical stance on women and equality. Danielle Strickland looks at the passages that have caused issues within the church, how these issues arose, and helps debunk the myths about women in the church. This book was an amazing read and I could not put it down. Everything in this book rang true for me and I've discovered a passion I did not realise was so strong within me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jo-Ann Murphy

    This book was not exactly what I was expecting. While I agree with most of what the author has to say, I think my problem was more in the presentation. would have prefered a more factual approach and less opinion. I did not learn too much from this book. Most of it I had heard before, but there were a couple of new interpretations of some passages, like those from the letter of Paul. It gave me something to think about.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    Religious differences aside, this book has a great message: Women are not less than men. The author discusses the different ways that women have been oppressed through religion. She then picks Bible passages that support her belief that women are equal to men rather than less than.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

    This book holds so much information for being so tiny. I loved it! It was very informative and empowering. The author does a great job of making her points based on the Bible and not preaching about her own opinions. I won this book in a giveaway.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Simone

    I loved this book. It was well researched and absolutely fundamental to women who have struggled with oppression within churches and the bible. Jesus loves women and is the first to treat with honour, dignity and respect. I Would highly recommend this.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Bowers

    A very quick, readable book. Comes across as based on solid Biblical principles. Not in any way anti-men. Even though it's not a thick book, it delves deeply into the issues. Engaging, enlightening and empowering. Will read over and over. A very quick, readable book. Comes across as based on solid Biblical principles. Not in any way anti-men. Even though it's not a thick book, it delves deeply into the issues. Engaging, enlightening and empowering. Will read over and over.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    Enlightening and powerful. Women have struggled in their spiritualality and we can do so much more if desired. A book you can reread and get more out after each reading. Thank you for letting me read it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Simon Genoe

    Quick read, helpful overview of the topic, useful interpretation of some New Testament passages concerning God's view of women and their role within the church. Quick read, helpful overview of the topic, useful interpretation of some New Testament passages concerning God's view of women and their role within the church.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Review to come on blog.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Lewis

    An outstanding book which was a real eye-opener to a lot of cultural norms that we've taken to be "gospel truth." Very thought-provoking and an exciting find. An outstanding book which was a real eye-opener to a lot of cultural norms that we've taken to be "gospel truth." Very thought-provoking and an exciting find.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Debs Erwin

    Content is great and very helpful but it lacks in-depth analysis, however it's a really good starting point for anyone wishing to begin to explore feminism and Christianity. Content is great and very helpful but it lacks in-depth analysis, however it's a really good starting point for anyone wishing to begin to explore feminism and Christianity.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  27. 4 out of 5

    EmmyMoonshine

  28. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kate Ellison

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Lee

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