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Published here in its entirety, Frida Kahlo's amazing illustrated journal documents the last ten years of her turbulent life. This passionate, often surprising, intimate record, kept under lock and key for some forty years in Mexico, reveals many new dimensions in the complex persona of this remarkable Mexican artist. Covering the years 1944-45, the 170-page journal contain Published here in its entirety, Frida Kahlo's amazing illustrated journal documents the last ten years of her turbulent life. This passionate, often surprising, intimate record, kept under lock and key for some forty years in Mexico, reveals many new dimensions in the complex persona of this remarkable Mexican artist. Covering the years 1944-45, the 170-page journal contains Frida's thoughts, poems, and dreams, and reflects her stormy relationship with her husband, Diego Rivera, Mexico's famous artist. The seventy watercolor illustrations in the journal - some lively sketches, several elegant self-portraits, others complete paintings - offer insights into her creative process, and show her frequently using the journal to work out pictorial ideas for her canvases. The text entries, written in Frida's round, full script in brightly colored inks, add an almost decorative quality, making the journal as captivating to look at as it is to read. Frida's childhood, her political sensibilities, and her obsession with Diego are all illuminated in witty phrases and haunting images. Although much has been written recently about this extraordinary woman, Frida Kahlo's art and life continue to fascinate the world. This personal document, published in a complete full-color facsimile edition, will add greatly to the understanding of her unique and powerful vision and her enormous courage in the face of more than thirty-five operations to correct injuries she had sustained in an accident at the age of eighteen. The facsimile is accompanied by an introduction by the world-renowned Mexican man of letters Carlos Fuentes and a complete translation of the diary's text. An essay on the place of the diary in Frida's work and in art history at large, as well as commentaries on the images, is provided by Sarah M. Lowe.


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Published here in its entirety, Frida Kahlo's amazing illustrated journal documents the last ten years of her turbulent life. This passionate, often surprising, intimate record, kept under lock and key for some forty years in Mexico, reveals many new dimensions in the complex persona of this remarkable Mexican artist. Covering the years 1944-45, the 170-page journal contain Published here in its entirety, Frida Kahlo's amazing illustrated journal documents the last ten years of her turbulent life. This passionate, often surprising, intimate record, kept under lock and key for some forty years in Mexico, reveals many new dimensions in the complex persona of this remarkable Mexican artist. Covering the years 1944-45, the 170-page journal contains Frida's thoughts, poems, and dreams, and reflects her stormy relationship with her husband, Diego Rivera, Mexico's famous artist. The seventy watercolor illustrations in the journal - some lively sketches, several elegant self-portraits, others complete paintings - offer insights into her creative process, and show her frequently using the journal to work out pictorial ideas for her canvases. The text entries, written in Frida's round, full script in brightly colored inks, add an almost decorative quality, making the journal as captivating to look at as it is to read. Frida's childhood, her political sensibilities, and her obsession with Diego are all illuminated in witty phrases and haunting images. Although much has been written recently about this extraordinary woman, Frida Kahlo's art and life continue to fascinate the world. This personal document, published in a complete full-color facsimile edition, will add greatly to the understanding of her unique and powerful vision and her enormous courage in the face of more than thirty-five operations to correct injuries she had sustained in an accident at the age of eighteen. The facsimile is accompanied by an introduction by the world-renowned Mexican man of letters Carlos Fuentes and a complete translation of the diary's text. An essay on the place of the diary in Frida's work and in art history at large, as well as commentaries on the images, is provided by Sarah M. Lowe.

30 review for The Diary of Frida Kahlo: An Intimate Self-Portrait

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    i took my time with frida's diary: one. because the emotion she reached inside of me felt raw and sometimes heavy but two. because i didn't want to come to its finish. i'm slightly obsessed (proudly) with this woman and find myself moved in ways that enrich my soul every time i spend time with frida. her love for life her passion for love and connection her desires for both the men and women in her life strike me in such a familiar way that guide me in embracing my true nature. her vulnerability created passi i took my time with frida's diary: one. because the emotion she reached inside of me felt raw and sometimes heavy but two. because i didn't want to come to its finish. i'm slightly obsessed (proudly) with this woman and find myself moved in ways that enrich my soul every time i spend time with frida. her love for life her passion for love and connection her desires for both the men and women in her life strike me in such a familiar way that guide me in embracing my true nature. her vulnerability created passion! equaling a force few knew how to handle. she's a sister from another time.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    Both the Introduction by Carlos Fuentes and Essay by Sarah M. Lowe that preface the diary entries are impressive. Frida Kahlo suffered much though her life - stricken by polio at seven, a bus accident where she broke her pelvis bone, spinal column, and had other serious injuries at 18 years old, over 20 operations, the affairs and divorce (then remarriage) of Diego Rivera, her inability to have children because of her injuries, and the eventual amputation of her leg. However, she loved life, pai Both the Introduction by Carlos Fuentes and Essay by Sarah M. Lowe that preface the diary entries are impressive. Frida Kahlo suffered much though her life - stricken by polio at seven, a bus accident where she broke her pelvis bone, spinal column, and had other serious injuries at 18 years old, over 20 operations, the affairs and divorce (then remarriage) of Diego Rivera, her inability to have children because of her injuries, and the eventual amputation of her leg. However, she loved life, painting, and Diego Rivera despite her pain and losses. For the last ten years of her life from 1944 - 1954, she kept a diary filled with her reflections and artwork. This is a complete full-color replica of her diary with color, ink blots, bleeding through pages, faded and vivid cursive writing, cross-outs, and remains of torn pages. At the end is an explanation and translation of her work. Her painted diary was intended to be private yet we see the “artist unmasked.” A fascinating insight into the workings of her mind in her final decade. Would this Mexican icon, who bared herself and her soul in her art, have wanted the world to know her innermost thoughts?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Suvi

    If you're about to read this expecting a traditional 'what I did today' -diary, you're in for a big surprise. Then again, if you already know Frida Kahlo you wouldn't really expect that, would you? Originally not intended to be published, through Kahlo's diary you get inside her head in the form of letters, notes, automatic writing and sketches. So much so, that you feel a bit rude for invading her thoughts. I don't claim to understand automatic writing, and even though Frida isn't a Surrealist, If you're about to read this expecting a traditional 'what I did today' -diary, you're in for a big surprise. Then again, if you already know Frida Kahlo you wouldn't really expect that, would you? Originally not intended to be published, through Kahlo's diary you get inside her head in the form of letters, notes, automatic writing and sketches. So much so, that you feel a bit rude for invading her thoughts. I don't claim to understand automatic writing, and even though Frida isn't a Surrealist, she occasionally seems to be using the same technique in her writings. I'm so far only visually into Surrealism, so for me those passages were the most difficult and confusing. But in the whole, is the diary really meant to be understood by someone other than her? Frida's writings and pictures together create a beautiful chaos, that helps you get a little bit closer to her art. Even you didn't understand everything, you can still feel the emotions that Frida went through when her health slowly deteriorated, and the love she had for Diego and pre-Columbian symbolism and culture. If you already admire Frida's art, this is a must read and a real gem of a companion piece to her paintings. I don't paint dreams or nightmares, I paint my own reality. The book itself had a little problematic layout, because the explanations and translations are all stuffed into the back of the book, forcing you to flip through the pages. The Finnish translation also had quite a bit of problems in terms of spelling. Not a huge thing, but stuff like that always sticks out when it's repeated a few times.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I really didn't enjoy this book. I thought it was going to be a basic translated version of Frida Kahlo's diary with a brief introduction of some kind about her and her life, It isn't. This book begins with a long larbourious introduction which, I felt, at times strays completely from Kahlo and can be very hard to follow. And then there is a full essay on the contents and format of Kahlo's diary. So before you get to view any of her work or her thoughts you've already been pounded with what two I really didn't enjoy this book. I thought it was going to be a basic translated version of Frida Kahlo's diary with a brief introduction of some kind about her and her life, It isn't. This book begins with a long larbourious introduction which, I felt, at times strays completely from Kahlo and can be very hard to follow. And then there is a full essay on the contents and format of Kahlo's diary. So before you get to view any of her work or her thoughts you've already been pounded with what two other people think about her and the diary itself. Then you have the diary which is in full colour and detail (the only good bit of this book) But the way the translation have been done is really awkward in as much as all the translation are grouped together at the end of the book with the commenttary of the person who did the introduction. So intead of having the diary on one page and the translation on the opposite page so that you could glance and compare between the two with ease, you have to flick back and forth to find the right translation for the right page while also figuring out what is the direct translation of Kahlo's word and what are actually the opinions and thoughts of someone else that have been put in there already. I felt like I had no space ''reading'' this book. I didn't enjoy it. there is a relatively simple timeline at the end of the book which I though was interesting but other then that not much else . The book disects every part of Frida Kahlo leaving no space for you have have your own thoughts, feelings or discoveries. Love Frida, Hated the book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    This is a facsimile of Frida Kahlo's diary, so of course it is awesome. 4 instead of 5 stars for bad layout decisions. I can kind of understand why, for example, all of the translation is at the end of the book, so as not to interrupt the flow of the diary itself, but it could have been done more elegantly so that it's not so hard to find the translation of the page you're looking at. A better option might have been to have all the commentary and translation in a separate volume, and/or make som This is a facsimile of Frida Kahlo's diary, so of course it is awesome. 4 instead of 5 stars for bad layout decisions. I can kind of understand why, for example, all of the translation is at the end of the book, so as not to interrupt the flow of the diary itself, but it could have been done more elegantly so that it's not so hard to find the translation of the page you're looking at. A better option might have been to have all the commentary and translation in a separate volume, and/or make some kind of online component to go with the diary now that we live in the future. Color coded page edges? Really, anything would be better than how it's laid out now. But, when you get down to it, complaining about having to flip pages back and forth is what I think some might call a "first world problem." It doesn't ruin the experience, just makes it clunky.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Fabienne

    "ALAS ROTAS" (p.156) "ALAS ROTAS" (p.156)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    in prep for my trip to Casa Azul....and because Frida is...Frida.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lana Reads

    If you love Frida Kahlo, this book will be a beautiful addition to your collection.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alana Klinka

    Frida Kahlo's diary is worth the read. It contains sketches that thematically connect to her paintings that are far more well know, however the texture and raw quality is quite different. You see her process and even for an artist who was so revealing in her work, there is more to see here! Reading this diary in the context of todays art world, where a sketch can be considered fine art, shows how timeless and relevant her work is. Frida Kahlo's diary is worth the read. It contains sketches that thematically connect to her paintings that are far more well know, however the texture and raw quality is quite different. You see her process and even for an artist who was so revealing in her work, there is more to see here! Reading this diary in the context of todays art world, where a sketch can be considered fine art, shows how timeless and relevant her work is.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This book is amazing. The haunting images alone are worth it (It's Kahlo, for god's sake!) and there's an English language translation of the text included. This book is amazing. The haunting images alone are worth it (It's Kahlo, for god's sake!) and there's an English language translation of the text included.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robin Bonne

    The artwork and her loopy, free, slightly messy handwriting makes this book truly inspiring. Essays and commentary are included with the translations.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    I have conflicted feelings about this one. Frida Kahlo kept a illustrated diary for the last ten years of her life. She also kept it locked up and private. Yet, here it is in the hands of the public - people she didn't even know. Is that not an invasion of privacy? And yet, I'm so glad this exists and is available for us to flip through. Like I said, I'm conflicted about this one. What I am not conflicted about is how lovely this book is. The production, color, and paper quality are all superb. M I have conflicted feelings about this one. Frida Kahlo kept a illustrated diary for the last ten years of her life. She also kept it locked up and private. Yet, here it is in the hands of the public - people she didn't even know. Is that not an invasion of privacy? And yet, I'm so glad this exists and is available for us to flip through. Like I said, I'm conflicted about this one. What I am not conflicted about is how lovely this book is. The production, color, and paper quality are all superb. Many have complained about how the book is laid out, but I think it was done just right. Yes, you have to flip back and forth between her diary pages, and the translations and commentary in the back, but that also enables you to see how her actual diary looked in its entirety - albeit with some pages clearly torn out. Unlike diarists who write for public consumption, this was a private one, so much of it makes no sense to the reader, and that is as it should be. The commentary does a good job of giving us context and connecting dots, but we are not Frida so cannot really understand all that we see and read. She was a remarkable woman and artist, and to get the opportunity to flip through a copy of her journal is a gift. With sincerest apologies to Ms. Kahlo.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ylenia

    "I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality." "I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    Although she begins this diary at the age of 37-ish, (the first date of entry is not clear) ~ it seems that because of everything that has suddenly happened physically & emotionally to her, that now ~~she will document things. And, of course, Frida will journal in her own artistic way. Some may find it difficult to read, because of the language barrier, because of her honesty in her pain & rage & beeeecause the love that did not die & because we see & feel the sadness that this love wrought upon h Although she begins this diary at the age of 37-ish, (the first date of entry is not clear) ~ it seems that because of everything that has suddenly happened physically & emotionally to her, that now ~~she will document things. And, of course, Frida will journal in her own artistic way. Some may find it difficult to read, because of the language barrier, because of her honesty in her pain & rage & beeeecause the love that did not die & because we see & feel the sadness that this love wrought upon her. I lost myself in the Spanish. Her words ring so beautifully. I kept re reading & repeating outloud: 'Se equivocó la paloma - Se equivocaba ~~~ ' By the time she writes this, she has now lost her right foot to the gangrene that continued to plague her for years. Now the foot must come away. She draws images of the foot. The sore marked foot, the leg attached to the foot that keeps it attached to her body. And then the foot alone. Blood. Pain. Casts. A painting of her body wrapped, wrapped & simply one belt holding this all together. And so she paints: Images of a body broken through out the diary. Images of the beautiful moment that is life through out her diary. Water. Horse. Dogs. Birds. Words to Diego, who we know has gone. Words of love - that show how much this love is still real for her. Pain. Emotional. Physical. It is not a conventional journal. It is rife with emotion. Frida's emotion. It is difficult to read, but the pages are so colourful. Her words never lose their courage nor strength. She remains Frida Kahlo. She is self aware of her own importance & so she continues even in illness & pain to create. I read this with a touch of sadness, she should have lived to be 90 or 100. She would have continued to create. She would know her place in the world that is ART & she would know of her importance in this world. She would never doubt it. This is an excellent companion to those who love Ms. Kahlo. Carlos Fuentes does an excellent job. He translates for those who need it. So.... read this book. And I quote from page 287 " Few artists have had the audacity to picture their own departure from this world, but then few faced death on so regular a basis. Never had the often-quoted statement by Kahlo seemed more appropriate: " I never painted dreams ~~~~ I painted my own reality " ~~☆~~~~~ ☆~~~~~ ☆~~~~~ ☆~~~~~ ☆~~~~~ ~~ ☆~~~~~ ☆~~~~~ ☆~~~~~ ☆~~~~~ ☆~~~~~

  15. 5 out of 5

    aleks

    Reading this is a little awkward, one has to have the book open in two places, with a finger between the pages, and maybe I should rate the diary for things like this -- the format, the commentary, and the like, but really, it seems a little ridiculous to me to rate this translation of Frida's thoughts and descriptions of her drawings, even if not quite as ridiculous as rating the diary itself would be. Sure, the work done here must be either great or poor-quality, but to me, this insight was so Reading this is a little awkward, one has to have the book open in two places, with a finger between the pages, and maybe I should rate the diary for things like this -- the format, the commentary, and the like, but really, it seems a little ridiculous to me to rate this translation of Frida's thoughts and descriptions of her drawings, even if not quite as ridiculous as rating the diary itself would be. Sure, the work done here must be either great or poor-quality, but to me, this insight was so nice just because it was, because really, there's nothing like finding this in a charity bookshop and getting to glance into Frida's mind with someone smarter holding your hand and attempting to guide you through it, and to be honest, I didn't even mind having to always keep my finger in between the pages.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    The Diary of Frida Kahlo: An Intimate Self-Portrait is a fascinating, sad, sober, amazing look into the mind of Frida Kahlo. The introduction by Carlos Fuentes is a poetic overview of her life, written possibly more for artists or students of art than the general reader. Even so, I recommend reading it. The bulk of this very heavy hardcover book are color photographs/reproduction of Kahlo’s diary. Most of the entries are not dated and her entries are sporadic. The last 40 pages or so are the Engl The Diary of Frida Kahlo: An Intimate Self-Portrait is a fascinating, sad, sober, amazing look into the mind of Frida Kahlo. The introduction by Carlos Fuentes is a poetic overview of her life, written possibly more for artists or students of art than the general reader. Even so, I recommend reading it. The bulk of this very heavy hardcover book are color photographs/reproduction of Kahlo’s diary. Most of the entries are not dated and her entries are sporadic. The last 40 pages or so are the English translations of her entries as well as an explanation of the Aztec images and symbolism Kahlo liked to employ. Sarah Lowe, who also has an essay in the book, provides the written discussion about the diary texts and images. Kahlo sketched and painted many images on the pages of her diary and many are startling, beautiful, unsettling and disturbing. Kahlo is a woman who painted her own physical disintegration and the pictures in the diary may have been the last paintings she ever did, paintings of her own death. If you are at all interested in the life and art of Frida Kahlo, I highly recommend this. Even though I have read a number of books about her and have been lucky enough to see her paintings at two traveling expeditions (Philadelphia Museum of Art and the AGO in Toronto), this book greatly expanded my appreciation of the woman and her art.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Svoboda

    Surely many of you watched the American movie about Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, played by Penelope Cruz and Alfred Molina. Croatian writer Slavenka Drakulic recently also wrote one documentary novel about famous Mexican painter called: "Frida Kahlo or about pain". As you can see, the pain and suffering of that great artist after traffic accident and high artistic fruits of her struggle for life, through so many hospital operations, serves as inspiration for many writers. After so many others t Surely many of you watched the American movie about Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, played by Penelope Cruz and Alfred Molina. Croatian writer Slavenka Drakulic recently also wrote one documentary novel about famous Mexican painter called: "Frida Kahlo or about pain". As you can see, the pain and suffering of that great artist after traffic accident and high artistic fruits of her struggle for life, through so many hospital operations, serves as inspiration for many writers. After so many others talked and wrote about her, finally this is her personal diary about the last ten years of her turbulent life. The diary contains words and scenes from Frida's passionate relationship of love and hate with her huband, celebrated painter as well, her thoughts, poems and especially Frida's dreams which were well-known source of inspiration for her surrealist paintings. As in every monographical book of that kind dozens of illustrations, self-portraits, unfinished sketches and finished paintings present her creative process from basic idea to completed work of art. Highly recommended to read such an intimate confession of a woman who was real heroine, successfully overwhelming so hard difficulties and tragic accidents of her life, that majority of us will never have to meet.

  18. 4 out of 5

    M. Jane Colette

    I devoured this book and will continue to devour it for years to come. The introduction by Carlos Fuentes is challenging but worth putting in the effort to read twice-thrice to really understand it. The faithful reproductions of the pages from Kahlo's diary--an art journal before there was such a trend!--through to bled-through inks and coffee stains are PHENOMENAL. The back end of the book contains translations of the pages--which is a great aid for non-Spanish readers--and contextualizations, I devoured this book and will continue to devour it for years to come. The introduction by Carlos Fuentes is challenging but worth putting in the effort to read twice-thrice to really understand it. The faithful reproductions of the pages from Kahlo's diary--an art journal before there was such a trend!--through to bled-through inks and coffee stains are PHENOMENAL. The back end of the book contains translations of the pages--which is a great aid for non-Spanish readers--and contextualizations, which, em, I don't know--in some cases, I could have done without. Regardless: I adore this book. The person who gifted it to me has my eternal gratitude. If you are looking for a gift for a Kahlo lover, this is perfect. And if you love Kahlo... you already own it yourself, don't you?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tristy

    There are no words to describe how important this book is to me. I regularly visit the pages of Frida Kahlo's diary for inspiration and deeper insight into my own life and perspective of the world. Some pages are heartbreaking and some are joyous, but it is all TRUE and that's the biggest teaching, here. I also learned to embrace the bleeding through of pages, when working in journals. "Messy" is inspiring and beautiful! There are no words to describe how important this book is to me. I regularly visit the pages of Frida Kahlo's diary for inspiration and deeper insight into my own life and perspective of the world. Some pages are heartbreaking and some are joyous, but it is all TRUE and that's the biggest teaching, here. I also learned to embrace the bleeding through of pages, when working in journals. "Messy" is inspiring and beautiful!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Leone Davidson

    This is my second time reading this in two years but after recently reading a wonderful biography of Kahlo by author Celia S. Stahr, I enjoyed going back through this, comparing Kahlo's own words to that of the biography. For the record, reading this was as good the second time as it was the first, and this was my review from the first time I read it: This is Frida Kahlo's journal, complete with illustrations. Terrific book - highly recommend! This is my second time reading this in two years but after recently reading a wonderful biography of Kahlo by author Celia S. Stahr, I enjoyed going back through this, comparing Kahlo's own words to that of the biography. For the record, reading this was as good the second time as it was the first, and this was my review from the first time I read it: This is Frida Kahlo's journal, complete with illustrations. Terrific book - highly recommend!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robin Tobin (On the back porch reading)

    Raw, Passionate, Alive through every emotion she had... And I confess, though you didn’t hear it from me, Oh wait, Yes you just did.... I have a girl crush on this amazing spit fire of a woman... What an amazing one-of-a-kind, over the top colorful soul... Frida’s authenticity to just be and feel herself as she lived life in the raw makes my jaw drop in Awe.....

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sleeping with Ghosts

    I don't know why, but Frida didn't attracted me too enough as an artist. I'd prefer Diego Rivera's work. I don't know why, but Frida didn't attracted me too enough as an artist. I'd prefer Diego Rivera's work.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ellie Kakoulli

    " I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality " Originally never intended to be published, “The Diary Of Frida Kahlo” provides a deeply intimate and emotionally raw insight into the mind of one of the greatest (in my opinion) artists of the 20th century. The shear passion, creativity and endurance that fuel these pages, quite frankly makes it utterly impossible to rate. So instead I’ll let the work and writing speak for it self: “I’ll try out the pencils sharpened to the point of infinity whic " I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality " Originally never intended to be published, “The Diary Of Frida Kahlo” provides a deeply intimate and emotionally raw insight into the mind of one of the greatest (in my opinion) artists of the 20th century. The shear passion, creativity and endurance that fuel these pages, quite frankly makes it utterly impossible to rate. So instead I’ll let the work and writing speak for it self: “I’ll try out the pencils sharpened to the point of infinity which always sees ahead: Green — good warm light Magenta — Aztec. old TLAPALI blood of prickly pear, the brightest and oldest Brown — colour of mole, of leaves becoming earth Yellow — madness sickness fear part of the sun and of happiness Blue — electricity and purity love Black — nothing is black — really nothing Olive — leaves, sadness, science, the whole of Germany is this colour Yellow — more madness and mystery all the ghosts wear clothes of this colour, or at least their underclothes Dark blue — colour of bad advertisements and of good business Blue — distance. Tenderness can also be this blue blood?” STUNNING. https://www.instagram.com/elliekakoulli/

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Hernandez

    It only shows the later years of her death, and you can see in her writing that her health is beginning to fail. You get some of her art that isn't out for public viewing (museums, etc.), which is pretty cool. It was a lot at times, and I had to put it away for a bit. I enjoyed the analysis at the end. Helped when I couldn't make out a few things. It only shows the later years of her death, and you can see in her writing that her health is beginning to fail. You get some of her art that isn't out for public viewing (museums, etc.), which is pretty cool. It was a lot at times, and I had to put it away for a bit. I enjoyed the analysis at the end. Helped when I couldn't make out a few things.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    Oh, MAN, what is not to love about Frida Kahlo's crazy life and art? Her diaries are gorgeous, startling, maddening, lyrical, lusty, full of pain and deep joy. Whenever I feel confined, I open these diaries and feell....freer somehow...able to keep going as an artist. Oh, MAN, what is not to love about Frida Kahlo's crazy life and art? Her diaries are gorgeous, startling, maddening, lyrical, lusty, full of pain and deep joy. Whenever I feel confined, I open these diaries and feell....freer somehow...able to keep going as an artist.

  26. 5 out of 5

    kelly

    Content was absolutely worthy of five stars but the formatting of this collection was difficult to follow. I wish they had done side by side translations throughout the journal rather than miniature translations at the back of the book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    nancy

    frida’s diary is incredible. her use of colors and the tales she tells are captivating. her life was incredibly hard and i think her love for diego rivera made everything worse. the analysis made by sarah is good and accurate. fuentes’ introduction is AMAZING. love that man. overall a good book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Petra

    Intimate, raw and almost impossible to review or rate.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    As often happens with significant women in history, particularly women of color, Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) was introduced to me as simply an extension of the more famous man in her life - her husband, the Mexican muralist Diego Rivera - and not as the remarkable icon she was in her own right. Thankfully, after coming out, I was reintroduced to her through a queer Latinx lens, one that refused to let Frida be seen as a sidekick but rather as the astonishing artist, revolutionary, and radical she wa As often happens with significant women in history, particularly women of color, Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) was introduced to me as simply an extension of the more famous man in her life - her husband, the Mexican muralist Diego Rivera - and not as the remarkable icon she was in her own right. Thankfully, after coming out, I was reintroduced to her through a queer Latinx lens, one that refused to let Frida be seen as a sidekick but rather as the astonishing artist, revolutionary, and radical she was on her own (the greater of the two, if you ask me). Not surprisingly, I now can’t get enough of her, and I’ve since devoured anything I can get my hands on that touches on her life. That’s why Jerry got me this beautiful book for my birthday last year, offering me a chance not just to learn about Frida from a bird’s eye view but rather to experience her art, her soul, and her passion from her own personal perspective. I wasn’t disappointed. It’s not perfect (some of the analysis offered alongside Frida’s diary entires is a bit wonky), but it’s a stunning collection. Through sketches, letters, poems, and short anecdotes, it offers you a front seat ride into the heart and mind of one of the most memorable artists of all time. It’s not an autobiography or memoir in the traditional sense, not in the slightest. Instead, it’s like a graphic novel, one that allows you to glimpse the spectrum of beauty, pain, and passion this queer icon experienced in the last 10 years of her short but fascinating life, one largely dominated by debilitating health issues and her tumultuous romance with Rivera (as well as with other famous men and women). I thoroughly enjoyed every page of this book, and I absolutely recommend it as a great place to start if you’re at all interested in learning more about the unforgettable Frida.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cátia Vieira

    Not only is Frida Kahlo considered to be one of the most renowned artists of the twentieth century, she is also recognized for her own biography which was affected by illness, pain, passion, uncertainty and death. The Diary of Frida Kahlo: An Intimate Self-Portait, published in 2014, covers the years 1944-45 and masterfully intertwines the artistic dimension and the text entries. First of all, this is a diary. This is more than a book destined to people who loves reading. This is for people who l Not only is Frida Kahlo considered to be one of the most renowned artists of the twentieth century, she is also recognized for her own biography which was affected by illness, pain, passion, uncertainty and death. The Diary of Frida Kahlo: An Intimate Self-Portait, published in 2014, covers the years 1944-45 and masterfully intertwines the artistic dimension and the text entries. First of all, this is a diary. This is more than a book destined to people who loves reading. This is for people who loves arts, who loves Frida Kahlo, who wishes to understand the human mind and who wants perhaps to comprehend what triggers her art creation. Above all, this is an intimate and honest self-portrait. As you read her journal, you come to realize that Frida Kahlo had never predicted the publication of her words. Therefore, they are truly sincere. Some entries aren’t more than a few words or loose thoughts. Besides the text entries that unveil the dreams, fears and thoughts of the Mexican artist, this book includes seventy watercolor illustrations. Some of these sketches, self-portraits or paintings are brutal and painful. Reading Frida Kahlo’s journal and admiring the numerous illustrations was such an incredible spiritual experience. Suddenly, you have the urge to stop trying to analyze everything. As I said, some entries are resumed to a few words. The key is to feel and go with her thoughts, fears and dreams. Lastly, I must be honest and say this was the most beautiful book I have ever laid my hands on and I found myself contemplating it over and over again. Even the paper has the most amazing touch. I’d like to thank Abrams & Chronicle for sending me a copy. For more reviews, follow me on Instagram: @booksturnyouon

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