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Trade, Plunder and Settlement: Maritime Enterprise and the Genesis of the British Empire, 1480-1630 (Cambridge Paperback Library)

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Not since 1945 has a general account of the origins of the British Empire been published, as if the demise of the empire freed us from our imperial past and historians from any obligation to digest it. Of course, it has done nothing of the kind, but it does enable the historian today to approach that past in a more critical spirit and to attempt a deeper and more detached Not since 1945 has a general account of the origins of the British Empire been published, as if the demise of the empire freed us from our imperial past and historians from any obligation to digest it. Of course, it has done nothing of the kind, but it does enable the historian today to approach that past in a more critical spirit and to attempt a deeper and more detached analysis than could have been expected a generation ago. The purpose of this work is therefore not merely to recount but to explain the course of English overseas expansion and the beginning of the overseas empire; a prolonged pregnancy, culminating in a difficult birth and sickly infancy. The introductory essay discusses the forces and motives involved in the expansion movement, which is seen as being part of a wider European movement and derivative in many ways from it. The author considers the attitude and conduct of the Tudors and early Stuarts towards this fundamentally commercial movement and examines the nature and importance of sea power, the contribution of different social groups, and the relevance of religious and economic ideals as well as nationalistic sentiment. These various themes are taken up again in the narrative chapters which follow, dealing with the enterprises of exploration, trade, plunder and colonisation successively through from the early Bristol quest for 'Brasil' to the diverse ventures of the 1620s.


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Not since 1945 has a general account of the origins of the British Empire been published, as if the demise of the empire freed us from our imperial past and historians from any obligation to digest it. Of course, it has done nothing of the kind, but it does enable the historian today to approach that past in a more critical spirit and to attempt a deeper and more detached Not since 1945 has a general account of the origins of the British Empire been published, as if the demise of the empire freed us from our imperial past and historians from any obligation to digest it. Of course, it has done nothing of the kind, but it does enable the historian today to approach that past in a more critical spirit and to attempt a deeper and more detached analysis than could have been expected a generation ago. The purpose of this work is therefore not merely to recount but to explain the course of English overseas expansion and the beginning of the overseas empire; a prolonged pregnancy, culminating in a difficult birth and sickly infancy. The introductory essay discusses the forces and motives involved in the expansion movement, which is seen as being part of a wider European movement and derivative in many ways from it. The author considers the attitude and conduct of the Tudors and early Stuarts towards this fundamentally commercial movement and examines the nature and importance of sea power, the contribution of different social groups, and the relevance of religious and economic ideals as well as nationalistic sentiment. These various themes are taken up again in the narrative chapters which follow, dealing with the enterprises of exploration, trade, plunder and colonisation successively through from the early Bristol quest for 'Brasil' to the diverse ventures of the 1620s.

32 review for Trade, Plunder and Settlement: Maritime Enterprise and the Genesis of the British Empire, 1480-1630 (Cambridge Paperback Library)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Diane Johnson

    I did not read this book from cover to cover, but in pieces for the purpose of supplemental character research. It has some fantastic insight on the British influence in shaping the world.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Greatbert

  3. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Murray

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jon

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

  9. 5 out of 5

    Edward Lengel

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kurosh

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ignacio Gallup-Diaz

  13. 5 out of 5

    William

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sam Newton

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sokol Ua

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Gannon

  17. 5 out of 5

    Drenwickf

  18. 5 out of 5

    Erika Tomoyose

  19. 4 out of 5

    Calarco Library Hopkins School

  20. 5 out of 5

    Victor

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pete H

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carina

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  26. 4 out of 5

    A

  27. 4 out of 5

    Giovanni Grant

  28. 5 out of 5

    Justyna

  29. 5 out of 5

    Fernando

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kopout

  31. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Mehmi

  32. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Gates

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