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Early Life: Evolution on the Precambrian Earth: Evolution on the Precambrian Earth

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Early Life: Evolution on the PreCambrian Earth, Second Edition offers an informative and compelling analysis of microbial evolution, often overlooked as the opening chapter of life's history. With this long-awaited new edition, Lynn Margulis and Michael Dolan integrate new discoveries from the past two decades, such as the enormous contribution of molecular biology, especi Early Life: Evolution on the PreCambrian Earth, Second Edition offers an informative and compelling analysis of microbial evolution, often overlooked as the opening chapter of life's history. With this long-awaited new edition, Lynn Margulis and Michael Dolan integrate new discoveries from the past two decades, such as the enormous contribution of molecular biology, especially the accumulation of protein and DNA sequence information upon which the Woese three-domain system is based. Yet the prokaryotic-eukaryotic distinction remains the largest evolutionary discontinuity in life on Earth. Are the well-formed filaments found so recently in the Warrawoona Series of northwestern Australia really evidence of the oldest life on the planet? Do the fossils found in the great Gunflint Iron Formation of Ontario tell that bacteria were instrumental in the accumulation of the most important iron reserves in the world? These questions are not solved here, but they are raised for students, scientists, and general readers interested in the most basic evolution and its consequences. No special scientific background is required of the reader, only a lively interest.


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Early Life: Evolution on the PreCambrian Earth, Second Edition offers an informative and compelling analysis of microbial evolution, often overlooked as the opening chapter of life's history. With this long-awaited new edition, Lynn Margulis and Michael Dolan integrate new discoveries from the past two decades, such as the enormous contribution of molecular biology, especi Early Life: Evolution on the PreCambrian Earth, Second Edition offers an informative and compelling analysis of microbial evolution, often overlooked as the opening chapter of life's history. With this long-awaited new edition, Lynn Margulis and Michael Dolan integrate new discoveries from the past two decades, such as the enormous contribution of molecular biology, especially the accumulation of protein and DNA sequence information upon which the Woese three-domain system is based. Yet the prokaryotic-eukaryotic distinction remains the largest evolutionary discontinuity in life on Earth. Are the well-formed filaments found so recently in the Warrawoona Series of northwestern Australia really evidence of the oldest life on the planet? Do the fossils found in the great Gunflint Iron Formation of Ontario tell that bacteria were instrumental in the accumulation of the most important iron reserves in the world? These questions are not solved here, but they are raised for students, scientists, and general readers interested in the most basic evolution and its consequences. No special scientific background is required of the reader, only a lively interest.

37 review for Early Life: Evolution on the Precambrian Earth: Evolution on the Precambrian Earth

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fred Kohn

    As is often the case with scientific books, I am going to have to reread this one. Nevertheless I am happy with the amount of information I absorbed the first time around. I didn't realize until I got to the end of the book that there was a glossary which was a shame. There were several unfamiliar terms that I could have referred to had I known the glossary was there. Nevertheless all in all I didn't feel terribly lost, as I sometimes do with scientific books. As is often the case with scientific books, I am going to have to reread this one. Nevertheless I am happy with the amount of information I absorbed the first time around. I didn't realize until I got to the end of the book that there was a glossary which was a shame. There were several unfamiliar terms that I could have referred to had I known the glossary was there. Nevertheless all in all I didn't feel terribly lost, as I sometimes do with scientific books.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Saúl Arias

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pirooz Pakdel

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sara Blauman

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ferran

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robin

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  9. 4 out of 5

    Trantor

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heather Gregory

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jaime Moraleda

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hickeyma

  13. 5 out of 5

    R.H.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joe Krehbiel

  15. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Griffis

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andre Ruigrok

  17. 4 out of 5

    Fred

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amberphlame

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marinelle

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Smith

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vsncruz

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi

  24. 4 out of 5

    S K

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pavan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Celia Osorno

  27. 5 out of 5

    Peter

  28. 4 out of 5

    Isa Vargas

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pavel

  31. 5 out of 5

    P

  32. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Vailcross

  33. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  34. 4 out of 5

    L

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jithin Karamel

  36. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  37. 5 out of 5

    John Holst

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