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The Toyota Way to Continuous Improvement: Linking Strategy and Operational Excellence to Achieve Superior Performance

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Building upon the international bestselling Toyota Way series of books by Jeffrey Liker, The Toyota Way to Continuous Improvement looks critically at lean deployments and identifies the root causes of why most of them fail. The book is organized into three major sections outlining: Why it is critical to go beyond implementing lean tools and, instead, build a culture of cont Building upon the international bestselling Toyota Way series of books by Jeffrey Liker, The Toyota Way to Continuous Improvement looks critically at lean deployments and identifies the root causes of why most of them fail. The book is organized into three major sections outlining: Why it is critical to go beyond implementing lean tools and, instead, build a culture of continuous improvement that connects operational excellence to business strategy Case studies from seven unique industries written from the perspective of the sensei (teacher) who led the lean transformation Lessons about transforming your own vision of an ideal organization into reality Section One: Using the Plan-Do-Check-Adjust (PDCA) methodology, Liker and Franz contrast true PDCA thinking to that of the popular, superficial approach of copying "lean solutions." They describe the importance of developing people and show how the Toyota Way principles support and drive continuous improvement. Explaining how lean systems and processes start with a purpose that provides a true north direction for all activities, they wrap up this section by examining the glaring differences between building a system of people, processes, and problem- solving that is truly lean versus that of simply trying to "lean out" a process. Section Two: This section brings together seven case studies as told by the sensei who led the transformation efforts. The companies range from traditional manufacturers, overhaul and maintenance of submarines, nuclear fuel rod production, health care providers, pathology labs, and product development. Each of these industries is different but the approaches used were remarkably similar. Section Three: Beginning with a composite story describing a company in its early days of lean implementation, this section describes what went right and wrong during the initial implementation efforts. The authors bring to light some of the difficulties the sensei faces, such as bureaucracies, closed-minded mechanical thinking, and the challenges of developing lean coaches who can facilitate real change. They address the question: Which is better, slow and deep organic deployment or fast and broad mechanistic deployment? The answer may surprise you. The book ends with a discussion on how to make continuous improvement a way of life at your company and the role of leadership in any lean transformation. The Toyota Way to Continuous Improvement is required reading for anyone seeking to transcend his or her tools-based approach and truly embrace a culture of continuous improvement.


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Building upon the international bestselling Toyota Way series of books by Jeffrey Liker, The Toyota Way to Continuous Improvement looks critically at lean deployments and identifies the root causes of why most of them fail. The book is organized into three major sections outlining: Why it is critical to go beyond implementing lean tools and, instead, build a culture of cont Building upon the international bestselling Toyota Way series of books by Jeffrey Liker, The Toyota Way to Continuous Improvement looks critically at lean deployments and identifies the root causes of why most of them fail. The book is organized into three major sections outlining: Why it is critical to go beyond implementing lean tools and, instead, build a culture of continuous improvement that connects operational excellence to business strategy Case studies from seven unique industries written from the perspective of the sensei (teacher) who led the lean transformation Lessons about transforming your own vision of an ideal organization into reality Section One: Using the Plan-Do-Check-Adjust (PDCA) methodology, Liker and Franz contrast true PDCA thinking to that of the popular, superficial approach of copying "lean solutions." They describe the importance of developing people and show how the Toyota Way principles support and drive continuous improvement. Explaining how lean systems and processes start with a purpose that provides a true north direction for all activities, they wrap up this section by examining the glaring differences between building a system of people, processes, and problem- solving that is truly lean versus that of simply trying to "lean out" a process. Section Two: This section brings together seven case studies as told by the sensei who led the transformation efforts. The companies range from traditional manufacturers, overhaul and maintenance of submarines, nuclear fuel rod production, health care providers, pathology labs, and product development. Each of these industries is different but the approaches used were remarkably similar. Section Three: Beginning with a composite story describing a company in its early days of lean implementation, this section describes what went right and wrong during the initial implementation efforts. The authors bring to light some of the difficulties the sensei faces, such as bureaucracies, closed-minded mechanical thinking, and the challenges of developing lean coaches who can facilitate real change. They address the question: Which is better, slow and deep organic deployment or fast and broad mechanistic deployment? The answer may surprise you. The book ends with a discussion on how to make continuous improvement a way of life at your company and the role of leadership in any lean transformation. The Toyota Way to Continuous Improvement is required reading for anyone seeking to transcend his or her tools-based approach and truly embrace a culture of continuous improvement.

30 review for The Toyota Way to Continuous Improvement: Linking Strategy and Operational Excellence to Achieve Superior Performance

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jan-Maat

    Since reading this book every time I hear of Toyota having problems, a car recall or a design fault I smile wryly and wonder which of their principles they had forgotten. That is unfair of me because the subtext of the book is that companies evolve and the Toyota story is about a company that moved from power looms to truck production to mass-produced cars responding to demand and aware of their business environment that they operated in. There is a little detail about how they prepare to launch Since reading this book every time I hear of Toyota having problems, a car recall or a design fault I smile wryly and wonder which of their principles they had forgotten. That is unfair of me because the subtext of the book is that companies evolve and the Toyota story is about a company that moved from power looms to truck production to mass-produced cars responding to demand and aware of their business environment that they operated in. There is a little detail about how they prepare to launch in a new market by getting one of their employees to drive in a hire car around North -America - who marvels at the size of the drinks sold to drivers and notes the road conditions, before they set to designing a car for the North-American market - one that had many oversized cup holders. This is a book about more than cars, the focus is on the cultural values of the company, in car production still inspired by the legacy of long time Toyota manager Taiichi Ohno, though his book Toyota Production System: Beyond large-scale production is much more interesting on the philosophy or spiritual side of the companies developments, this though is a good supplement on the history and nut and bolts.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alex Railean

    Notes for internal use: - Have a manual process first, that allows you to understand better where automation is needed - Treat colleagues as customers (provide output for them at the same specs as for the end customer) - Kaisen - improve processes by a tiny bit, until all waste is removed - Kaisen also encourages the delegation of process improvement (or proposal-generation) down from management to regular workers - Kaisen also states that to improve something, you have to standardize it first (for r Notes for internal use: - Have a manual process first, that allows you to understand better where automation is needed - Treat colleagues as customers (provide output for them at the same specs as for the end customer) - Kaisen - improve processes by a tiny bit, until all waste is removed - Kaisen also encourages the delegation of process improvement (or proposal-generation) down from management to regular workers - Kaisen also states that to improve something, you have to standardize it first (for reliable replicability?) - Focus on quality rather than cost, this eventually leads to cost reduction too - Muda - waste 1. Overproduction 2. Waiting 3. Unnecessary transport of goods or parts 4. Overprocessing or incorrect processing 5. Excess inventory. This also masks problems, like suboptimal supply chains, because the excess buffer dampens it 6. Unnecessary movement of employees 7. Defects - repairs, reworks, refactoring post release 8. Unused employment creativity - Muri - overburden (people or equipment) - This leads to safety issues and defects - Mura - unevenness - Unbalanced load, at times you are in zombie mode, other times you have not much to do - Lack of balance means that you will have to keep supplies reserved to handle the worst case, whereas most of the time they will be unused (hence muda) - Better to be slow and steady like a turtle, than fast and jerky like a rabbit - Jidoka - stop the production line to fix issues and improve the process - Think about what gets halted - no need to stop everything -Every employee can pull the cord to do so, thus everyone is empowered and at the same time - responsible - Cost of fix in development is much smaller than in production - Autonomation - automation augmented with human intelligence - Lexus rx330 has a 170 item checklist - Institute a process improvement proposal mechanism, that employees can use to submit their ideas about improvements - Visualize state, so no problems are hidden. Use dashboards to reflect the processes, so bottlenecks and weak spots are easy to see. - Genshi genbutsu - go and see for yourself - Nemawashi - Make decisions slowly, by consensus; implement rapidly - Ask "why" 5 times - Hansei - reflection. Think about the situation. When a mistake is made - it is important to see how the employee reflects upon it and how they present the lessons they've drawn from it - Change the approach from "firefighting" to "process improvement"

  3. 4 out of 5

    Vikram Kalkura

    The Toyota way should be everyone's way. Great book with greater insights on how to be successful in your business along with how to make a profitable business. The insights can be applied not only for the automobile or transport industries but also for the software companies as well. TPS and Lean manufacturing has been created and developed by Toyota and now are used by many companies across the world. The book explains why Toyota has become one of the most successful company in the world and w The Toyota way should be everyone's way. Great book with greater insights on how to be successful in your business along with how to make a profitable business. The insights can be applied not only for the automobile or transport industries but also for the software companies as well. TPS and Lean manufacturing has been created and developed by Toyota and now are used by many companies across the world. The book explains why Toyota has become one of the most successful company in the world and why Ford came in to inspect the TPS - Toyota production system. The 5s methodology - sort, straighten, shine, standardise and sustain is a great learning from this book. Love the JIT and how they stop the production as soon as they find a fault or defect in the production system. Also explains on how to minimal waste and improve efficiency. Also this book will make you understand why Japanese are the best as well. They just don't do things. They ask why and and then do it and do it to perfection. Overall a great book to read to be a successful manager and to have a better success at any venture that you start. One thing that ponders me after reading this is why does Toyota recall some of the cars if they have followed the TPS and all the systems in place properly. What principle is at flaw here and that's why I have given 4 stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    ScienceOfSuccess

    Most people may don't know, but Toyota is considered "the autistic-genius" by car manufacturers. They do everything differently, they stop producing lane when something is not ok, they don't produce X cars per hour, they have days when 0 cars are produced, just to be sure that every car going to the market doesn't have a defect they could fix. This book summed up this method into 14 rules, that can be used in your house or work, but they may feel like you do something against yourself, probably ag Most people may don't know, but Toyota is considered "the autistic-genius" by car manufacturers. They do everything differently, they stop producing lane when something is not ok, they don't produce X cars per hour, they have days when 0 cars are produced, just to be sure that every car going to the market doesn't have a defect they could fix. This book summed up this method into 14 rules, that can be used in your house or work, but they may feel like you do something against yourself, probably against 'common sense' too. If you watched "how its made" at least once, this book may blow your mind, and you will love it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    Great insight into the Toyota Production System. My critique of it is that there is no discussion of drawbacks, if any. I'm skeptical of any methodology that isn't honest about its failings. Great insight into the Toyota Production System. My critique of it is that there is no discussion of drawbacks, if any. I'm skeptical of any methodology that isn't honest about its failings.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bob Wallner

    The Toyota Way continues to be on my annual reread or re-listen to list. The 14 principles are universal and are as relevant today as they were when this was written. The Toyota Way is one of those rare books that every time you read it, you learn something new, and going out in experimenting and trying to apply that new learning is exciting and rewarding. Dr. Liker is careful to warn that although the 14 principles are a good blueprint to creating a lean organization, anyone who sets out and copi The Toyota Way continues to be on my annual reread or re-listen to list. The 14 principles are universal and are as relevant today as they were when this was written. The Toyota Way is one of those rare books that every time you read it, you learn something new, and going out in experimenting and trying to apply that new learning is exciting and rewarding. Dr. Liker is careful to warn that although the 14 principles are a good blueprint to creating a lean organization, anyone who sets out and copies what Toyota has done, will fail. The learning is where companies grow. The audiobook is extremely well narrated and provides small snippets of each of the 14 principles. For someone who spends almost 3 hours a day in his car, this book can we listen to in a day and a half. As much as I enjoy the brevity of the audiobook, I really would love an unabridged audio version of the Toyota Way. Having read the book a couple times I know that there is a lot of substance that is not covered in the abridged audio.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erwin

    Toyota Industries Corporation was a Japanese maker of automatic looms (device used to weave cloth) when Kiichiro (eldest son of the founder) established the Toyota Motor Corporation. Toyota had was capital poor, resource poor, and the Japanese car market was small. Kiichiro devised a strategy of Operational Excellence, along the lines of Sam Walton's strategy for Wall Mart. Eventually, the strategy of operational excellence (elimination of waste) allowed resource poor Toyota to dominate it's res Toyota Industries Corporation was a Japanese maker of automatic looms (device used to weave cloth) when Kiichiro (eldest son of the founder) established the Toyota Motor Corporation. Toyota had was capital poor, resource poor, and the Japanese car market was small. Kiichiro devised a strategy of Operational Excellence, along the lines of Sam Walton's strategy for Wall Mart. Eventually, the strategy of operational excellence (elimination of waste) allowed resource poor Toyota to dominate it's resource rich western rivals. Ironically, Kiichiro was inspired by Henry Ford's book, which many Ford Motor Company managers and executives have not read. Kiichiro's critical insight is similar to Eliyahu M. Goldratt's Theory of Constraints with it's focus on optimisation, especially as related to the factory floor. Typically factories want to keep all of their capital equipment busy, so that they can make good use of their investment. Each machine creates small piles of partially finished goods. Kiichiro realised that more important than the capital and labor (opportunity cost) tied up in this work in process, the bigger problem is that all of these bits of intermediate inventory HIDE PROBLEMS. As if you've poured lots of grease into an engine. Even if the parts don't fit together and operate precisely, the engine will still work because it's heavily lubricated. Like the early days of Sam Walton, Kiichiro was capital poor, he couldn't compete using the same strategy as his advisories. By draining all of the lubrication (intermediate stages of inventory) out of the system, problems would constantly come to the surface. Each time a problem was located, it was corrected. The result was a machine that was built to constantly improve. Kiichiro's strategy can be applied to more than just the assembly line. The crux of the issue is as simple as Obvious Adams - focus on your customer and see the world from their perspective. Fortunately, Kiichiro's strategy is more rigorous, offering specific tactics and tools. Toyota has developed a set of concepts that dominate much of the manufacturing world. The core of the Toyota way is the focus on elimination of WASTE. Waste is typically represented as inventory. The entire product/service production/development system must be focused on the end consumer of the product, and from that consumer work backward to what must be produced. The result is Lean Manufacturing, or ultimately the Lean Enterprise. It's also the foundation for The Lean Startup and Lean Government. Core principles of the Toyota Way (Lean) are: * 現地現物 Genchi Benbutsu. Go and See. Managers must go to the source of the problem and see it with their own eyes, not trust the verbal or written reports of their subordinates. * 改善 Kaizen. Improvement. No matter how good the process is, it can always be made more perfect. Build a system where problems easily come to the surface, and fix them quickly. * 看板 Kanban. Signboard. Kanbans put a cap on the maximum amount of each type of inventory at a given time. Because kanbans represent inventory, and inventory is waste, a lean enterprise starts with Kanban's but eventually works to minimize and eliminate them. * 無駄. Without Waste. Remove all Transportation, Inventory, Motion, Waiting, Over Processing, Over Production and Defects from your production process. Also, not taking advantage of your employees latent skill is also a form of waste. * 平準化. Heijunka. Production levelling. Peaks and troughs in production create waste. Sometimes you're idle. Sometimes everybody is working overtime. Enlist the sales and marketing team to help equalise demand. From sourcing of materials to sales of finished goods, ideally you want the process to work like a metronome. Constant. * 行灯. Andon. Something like a Stop Sign that allows any employee to stop the system anytime that a production defect is located. It is always cheaper to fix a defect at the source than to allow the defect to progress through production and find it during QA. The power to stop the system also shows trust in employees and empowers them, helping them to be emotionally committed to the process. That said, I think that any sort of "miracle elixir" that points out the "one true way" must be eyed skeptically. Toyota's success just as much the result of Japanese economic policy and luck as it is the "inevitable result" of Toyota's philosophy and discipline. If you're going to implement "The Toyota Way" in your own enterprise, I recommend that you read The Black Swan in parallel. I think that this methodology is not suitable to every manufacturing company, but only to companies where the entire management and even a large percentage of the employees are really willing to strive for perfectionism over the long term. One Amazon reviewer from North Carolina recently wrote that: 'If you want your company to crash and burn then this is the book for you. Within a year of our company implement Jeffrey Liker's "Toyota Way" our company started losing customers and money. Now hundreds of people are out of work - all thanks to the "Toyota Way".'

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stef Bezanis

    Getting a Prius now

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This book took me on a much longer journey than expected. I found it to be so packed with information that it took a while to wade through. Coming from a church leadership background instead of a manufacturing background meant that I did not have some of the prerequisites that the book's intended audience might have. For me personally, Part 1 (The World-Class Power of the Toyota Way) was an interesting look into the changing world of manufacturing and lean production. It has helped me appreciate This book took me on a much longer journey than expected. I found it to be so packed with information that it took a while to wade through. Coming from a church leadership background instead of a manufacturing background meant that I did not have some of the prerequisites that the book's intended audience might have. For me personally, Part 1 (The World-Class Power of the Toyota Way) was an interesting look into the changing world of manufacturing and lean production. It has helped me appreciate where some of my congregants are coming from in the workday lives, but it did not strike me as deeply as I had hoped from a leadership standpoint. That came in Part 2. I'd recommend reading Part 2 in its entirety after skimming Part 1. Part 2 (The Business Principles of The Toyota Way) offered immediately applicable leadership paradigms. Like many leadership guides, these paradigms are not necessarily new, but seeing them in action is important. These are what I found most helpful: 1. Develop leadership from the inside with people who know your organization. 2. Focus on long-term goals at the expense of short-term. 3. Respect and challenge your extended network to benefit them and your organization. Heijunka- Level Out the Workload Genchi Genbutsu: Go and See for Yourself Hansei: Relentless Reflection Kaizen: Continuous Improvement So, why would a pastor read this? Many-- all actually-- of Toyota's leadership principles put people first. In other word's they love their neighbors as themselves. I'm not suggesting that Toyota is a Christian or even Biblical company, but it is refreshing to me to see a Global Corporation that has not sacrificed the health of its workers or community for shareholders. Toyota takes a long-term approach and values face-to-face relationships. Its managers do not follow a typical executive "top-down" approach. They have grease on their hands, acknowledge mistakes (asking 5-whys), and know their company inside and out. Many pastors would do well to consider the long term goals of the Kingdom and the Church ahead of their own ambition. They would find insight by putting relationships ahead of tasks, and they would empower their congregations by willing to acknowledge mistakes while suggesting steps for correction. Whether or not they would further their ministry by driving a Toyota is open for debate.

  10. 5 out of 5

    robert

    In factories around the world, Toyota consistently makes the highest-quality cars with the fewest defects of any competing manufacturer, while using fewer man-hours, less on-hand inventory, and half the floor space of its competitors. The Toyota Way is the first book for a general audience that explains the management principles and business philosophy behind Toyota's worldwide reputation for quality and reliability. The fourteen management principles of the Toyota Way create the ideal environmen In factories around the world, Toyota consistently makes the highest-quality cars with the fewest defects of any competing manufacturer, while using fewer man-hours, less on-hand inventory, and half the floor space of its competitors. The Toyota Way is the first book for a general audience that explains the management principles and business philosophy behind Toyota's worldwide reputation for quality and reliability. The fourteen management principles of the Toyota Way create the ideal environment for implementing Lean techniques and tools. Dr. Liker explains each key principle with detailed, examples from Toyota and other Lean companies on how to: foster an atmosphere of continuous improvement and learning, create continuous process "flow" to unearth problems, satisfy customers (and eliminate waste at the same time), grow your leaders rather than purchase them, get quality right the first time, grow together with your suppliers and partners for mutual benefit. Dr. Liker shows the Toyota Way in action, then outlines how to apply the Toyota Way in your organisation, with examples of how other companies have rebuilt their culture to create a Lean, learning enterprise. The Toyota Way is an inspiring guide to taking the steps necessary to emulate Toyota's remarkable success.

  11. 5 out of 5

    HBalikov

    "Toyota has sought harmony between people, society, and the global environment, as well as the sustainable development of society, through manufacturing." http://www.toyota.com.bh/pages/vision... Liker focuses on the management principles that have guided this post-WW II success story. Not very critical, but well-organized and highly useful to anyone who wants to study Toyota's path. I found the parts dealing with how Toyota emphasizes that it is a "learning organization" particularly insightful, "Toyota has sought harmony between people, society, and the global environment, as well as the sustainable development of society, through manufacturing." http://www.toyota.com.bh/pages/vision... Liker focuses on the management principles that have guided this post-WW II success story. Not very critical, but well-organized and highly useful to anyone who wants to study Toyota's path. I found the parts dealing with how Toyota emphasizes that it is a "learning organization" particularly insightful, highlighting how experience is integrated by taking necessary corrective actions and distributing broadly the knowledge of each experience.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sambasivam Mani

    This book reveals several procedures used in the manufacturing company. 4P Model (Problem Solving, People and Partners, Process and Philosophy), 5S Methodology (Sort, Straighten, Shine, Standardize and Sustain) and PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-Act or Deming Cycle). If anyone is willing to start a new manufacturing company they can use this book as a blue print. Helps us to learn some of the techniques used in Japan like Muri, Mura, Muda, Kanban, Heijunka, Jidoka and ohno and create eagerness to learn Jap This book reveals several procedures used in the manufacturing company. 4P Model (Problem Solving, People and Partners, Process and Philosophy), 5S Methodology (Sort, Straighten, Shine, Standardize and Sustain) and PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-Act or Deming Cycle). If anyone is willing to start a new manufacturing company they can use this book as a blue print. Helps us to learn some of the techniques used in Japan like Muri, Mura, Muda, Kanban, Heijunka, Jidoka and ohno and create eagerness to learn Japanese.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    This book was my formal introduction to Lean and the Toyota Production System (TPS). I have utilized some Lean tools before when I was a business analyst (although I did not know the tools were Lean at the time!) but this book provides tremendous depth past my experience. I enjoyed the learning all of the principles at Toyota, especially the emphasis on people. I highly recommend this book to anybody interested in learning about this topic.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Vienny

    Jeffrey Liker offers some very good insight into the stark differences that exist between management styles/business models, particularly in the Eastern and Western cultures. It was a struggle for me to read between the case studies and, sometimes, the author seemed too preachy about the principles of the Toyota way. The case studies themselves were very interesting and add a lot of value to the content of the book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Yulya Roesdy

    The Toyota Way by Jeffrey K Liker gives a common sense approach to Business Process Improvements. It's a good start for everybody interested in lean management and lean production. This book goes into depth on several concepts that make the Toyota Way different from most western companies. It will definitely change the way you see business and management. -Yulya Roesdy- The Toyota Way by Jeffrey K Liker gives a common sense approach to Business Process Improvements. It's a good start for everybody interested in lean management and lean production. This book goes into depth on several concepts that make the Toyota Way different from most western companies. It will definitely change the way you see business and management. -Yulya Roesdy-

  16. 4 out of 5

    David

    I would recommend this book to anyone looking to optimize any type of organization. The further the organization is from manufacturing the more work required for the reader to apply, but there is an immense amount of wisdom there. The application is universal because of how much Toyota focuses their attention on the intersection of the organizational culture and the operational systems.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andreea Pausan

    In a world of mass production that is continuously and rapidly changing, Toyota managed to create a lean production system based on family values, excellence, continuous improvement, leadership and little waste. The 14 principles are explained in detail, with examples and clarification. Great book, great lessons to be learned and applied by all.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Reading this book because one of my hospital clients wishes to combine their approach to engagement and Lean/Six Sigma. I've purchased 4 books on this topic and this might be the best one on this dual approach. You can't maximize operational efficiency at the expense of solid people practices. Reading this book because one of my hospital clients wishes to combine their approach to engagement and Lean/Six Sigma. I've purchased 4 books on this topic and this might be the best one on this dual approach. You can't maximize operational efficiency at the expense of solid people practices.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laurène

    I read this book for my MBA program. While it's a good reference for anyone who wants to become familiar with lean manufacturing, it is a horrible, dry, boring read. I'll keep it as a reference but will dread having to ever open it again! I read this book for my MBA program. While it's a good reference for anyone who wants to become familiar with lean manufacturing, it is a horrible, dry, boring read. I'll keep it as a reference but will dread having to ever open it again!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    I have no doubt, it is the best TPS or Lean Manufacturing book I`ve ever read. It has several examples of how Toyota, which is the founding father of this movement, save time, effort and errors... I highly recommend it. Even if you are Spanish (like me) you could easily understand it. I have no doubt, it is the best TPS or Lean Manufacturing book I`ve ever read. It has several examples of how Toyota, which is the founding father of this movement, save time, effort and errors... I highly recommend it. Even if you are Spanish (like me) you could easily understand it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    Use visual control so no problems are hidden... indeed!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alf Kåre Lefdal

    Toyota created "Lean Manufacturing" through their "Toyota Production System", and has transferred these principles to their product development process. This is the foundation of Lean Software Development, as described in the books of Mary and Tom Poppendieck. In the way Toyota runs their business, you will recognize everything that has to do with agile software development, and the book describes not only the processes, but also the leadership philosophy that it builds on. Toyota created "Lean Manufacturing" through their "Toyota Production System", and has transferred these principles to their product development process. This is the foundation of Lean Software Development, as described in the books of Mary and Tom Poppendieck. In the way Toyota runs their business, you will recognize everything that has to do with agile software development, and the book describes not only the processes, but also the leadership philosophy that it builds on.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Henri Hämäläinen

    Whole idea behind the book is to give an better view what makes Toyota manufacturing system such a good one. It introduces TPS (Toyota Production System), Kanban and lots of other systems they use.Still most importantly it tells about the importance of company culture, continuous learning and true understanding about the thinking behind TPS. I really loved the book, because it didn't only tell about Toyota's way of working, but about the actual culture around it. Whole idea behind the book is to give an better view what makes Toyota manufacturing system such a good one. It introduces TPS (Toyota Production System), Kanban and lots of other systems they use.Still most importantly it tells about the importance of company culture, continuous learning and true understanding about the thinking behind TPS. I really loved the book, because it didn't only tell about Toyota's way of working, but about the actual culture around it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dan Graham

    This book is really dense, but a good read if you’re looking to get some ideas and strategies for streamlining your manufacturing process. The author has a huge crush on Toyota, which makes for some sappy reading at times but definitely a worthwhile read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I would call this THE Lean Textbook. I have this in hardback and CD. After reading the book I have listened to the CD several times. This is a quick an easy read that increases my lean understanding each time I review it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Major

    I found the book extermely educating experience. I learnt so many new techniques which all the manufacturing companies should practice.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rafael Bandeira

    Best book on Lean. A must read for everyone in any business. Apply these concepts on your cooking and on your room cleaning process, and you'll be billionaire. Seriously. Best book on Lean. A must read for everyone in any business. Apply these concepts on your cooking and on your room cleaning process, and you'll be billionaire. Seriously.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dmytro

    The problem with this book is written by a professor. In other words, an outsider who is writing about observations. Books written by someone actually doing the work are much better.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Senoj Jones

    good book to understand how Toyota went from being just another company to an innovative manufacturer

  30. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    - In essence, the Toyota way is the extreme flexibility to solve the problem (rather than a hierarchy model): focus on the efficiency improvement from the moment customer orders to customer paying. - Lots of improvement would seem counterintuitive in a traditional sense - that's because people are molded in group think. It's important to step out of it (or switch to a new industry to get rid of pre-existing notions of your old industry) - When the Toyota team first visited American, they quickly - In essence, the Toyota way is the extreme flexibility to solve the problem (rather than a hierarchy model): focus on the efficiency improvement from the moment customer orders to customer paying. - Lots of improvement would seem counterintuitive in a traditional sense - that's because people are molded in group think. It's important to step out of it (or switch to a new industry to get rid of pre-existing notions of your old industry) - When the Toyota team first visited American, they quickly saw the inefficiencies of the factory, not the efficiencies: again, its important to step outside to know what's going on inside - Execution is often more important than idea. The Toyota way is in essence very much of a Henry Ford way, just executed much better - Details are very important. Before moving into bigger projects, make sure you have nailed the detail to extreme - only then you can scale much more efficiently (scale then work on detail doesn't work - like Ford's experience even to this date) - Customer isn't only limited to your end customer, internal customer (employees) also needs to be in the equation in order to have the best productivity - Kaizen: constantly seek and work on small improvements - no matter how small - in order to reach more perfection - When thinking about business, it's important to think from the customer's perspectives first, then work backwards. By focusing on this, one could allocate the most energy on the important parts, and limit energy on not so important (or even unnecessary) parts - Never trust conventional, intuitive thinking just because of they're common. Question everything - is maintance really necessary? Do we always need to over supply etc - When problem arise, fix then immediately rather than waiting for others to find a magical cure - Recognition of team work is very important. You can't let workers feel like they're independent of each other and won't have to take individual responsibility for problems - People are key. TPS rely heavily on bottom employees finding problem and finding cure. That's very important. A bottom up structure is vastly more superior than a pyramid structure - Keep working on minimizing waste - either material or personal waste. Even if they look absurd on the outset, little by little adds up very fast - Condense reports to 1 page maximum. Never try to burden communication - Avoid hiring leaders from the outside - they won't understand your company culture. Instead, train your internal employees to become leaders of tomorrow - Focus on your supplier as well. They success is also yours (Kroc also repeated the same idea in his McDonald book) - Focus on the reality on the ground - conduct research yourself, never rely on secondary sources - Take time to decide - don't make decision too quickly. Gather as much information as possible and decide the most optimal way for all. And once decision is made, implement it quickly - Standardize process, avoid changing the process completely every time a new leadership appears - Set a goal (car needs to be quieter), then brainstorm ways to accomplish it: often times the solution isn't conventional wisdom (heavier car with more isolation) rather a smart innovation (quieter engine) - never rely on conventional wisdom blindly - Make one small improvement day by day, and eventually there'd be a big improvement overall (echoed by Henry Ford a century ago) - The most scary time isn't when you're not successful, rather it's when you are successful. Success can blind you in competency (Ford Motors Company is a great example). Thus, during a great success, it's vital to find a new challenge to stay grounded - Company needs to change, constantly. Thus it's important to find a person or next product that would revolutionize yourself - its far better for you to be your biggest competitor than someone else to be - Focus on the long term vision, avoid getting trapped in short term vision

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