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How much of science is fact, and how much is theory? How much evidence is needed to prove a theory? Why do scientific dating techniques give so many "ages" that contradict Bible chronology? Why do so many scientists say Noah’s Flood was just a myth? Why do people claim that their loss of faith was due to scientific “enlightenment”? These and related questions have led to m How much of science is fact, and how much is theory? How much evidence is needed to prove a theory? Why do scientific dating techniques give so many "ages" that contradict Bible chronology? Why do so many scientists say Noah’s Flood was just a myth? Why do people claim that their loss of faith was due to scientific “enlightenment”? These and related questions have led to more than 40 years of research—which, in turn, has led to intriguing possibilities for reconciling some of the conflicts between science and religion. Truth is truth—no matter the source. Sorting it out from the vast amount of information pouring out every day is an unending task. This book, Science and Religion, is written to be clear and understandable—even to non-scientists, and it opens up ideas that most people have not yet explored. It includes summaries of some lesser-known scientific theories which are more consistent with accounts described in the Bible. The author has taken a rather literal approach to the scriptures and related sources, and shares his findings without making dogmatic pronouncements. Should you read Science and Religion: Reconciling the Conflicts? Do. If you believe that truth is truth—from whatever the source. Do. If you’d like to understand better why so many scientific date estimates contradict Bible Chronology. Don’t. If you are totally convinced that science is not only the sole provider of real truth, but also its arbiter, and that religion has nothing positive to offer. This book will probably just annoy you and cause venom to spew from your pen. Do. If you are trying to decide whether to put your faith in God, in science, or some in each, read this book and find some promising possibilities for reconciling the conflicts. Don’t. If you are totally convinced that the only reality is the physical—that spiritual matters are just fantasy, you probably won’t enjoy this book. Do. If you are open to the possibility that there might be a reality beyond the realm of the physical—out of reach of modern technology, you’ll likely enjoy this book. Do. If you’d like to hear some unusual, but plausible possibilities for reconciling some of the conflicts between science and a rather literal approach to the Bible, read this book. Don’t. If you are convinced that all aspects of conventional science are tested and true, don’t read this book, it will probably cause you heartburn. Do. If you haven’t closed your mind to receiving truth from either science or religion, you’ll probably enjoy some intriguing theories which seem to lead in the direction of reconciling the conflicts. Don’t. If you are convinced that science—in practice—is totally objective and proven beyond any doubt, don’t read this book, it just might provoke you to anger. Do. If you recognize that the existence of God cannot be proved or disproved by science, you just might gain some intriguing insights.


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How much of science is fact, and how much is theory? How much evidence is needed to prove a theory? Why do scientific dating techniques give so many "ages" that contradict Bible chronology? Why do so many scientists say Noah’s Flood was just a myth? Why do people claim that their loss of faith was due to scientific “enlightenment”? These and related questions have led to m How much of science is fact, and how much is theory? How much evidence is needed to prove a theory? Why do scientific dating techniques give so many "ages" that contradict Bible chronology? Why do so many scientists say Noah’s Flood was just a myth? Why do people claim that their loss of faith was due to scientific “enlightenment”? These and related questions have led to more than 40 years of research—which, in turn, has led to intriguing possibilities for reconciling some of the conflicts between science and religion. Truth is truth—no matter the source. Sorting it out from the vast amount of information pouring out every day is an unending task. This book, Science and Religion, is written to be clear and understandable—even to non-scientists, and it opens up ideas that most people have not yet explored. It includes summaries of some lesser-known scientific theories which are more consistent with accounts described in the Bible. The author has taken a rather literal approach to the scriptures and related sources, and shares his findings without making dogmatic pronouncements. Should you read Science and Religion: Reconciling the Conflicts? Do. If you believe that truth is truth—from whatever the source. Do. If you’d like to understand better why so many scientific date estimates contradict Bible Chronology. Don’t. If you are totally convinced that science is not only the sole provider of real truth, but also its arbiter, and that religion has nothing positive to offer. This book will probably just annoy you and cause venom to spew from your pen. Do. If you are trying to decide whether to put your faith in God, in science, or some in each, read this book and find some promising possibilities for reconciling the conflicts. Don’t. If you are totally convinced that the only reality is the physical—that spiritual matters are just fantasy, you probably won’t enjoy this book. Do. If you are open to the possibility that there might be a reality beyond the realm of the physical—out of reach of modern technology, you’ll likely enjoy this book. Do. If you’d like to hear some unusual, but plausible possibilities for reconciling some of the conflicts between science and a rather literal approach to the Bible, read this book. Don’t. If you are convinced that all aspects of conventional science are tested and true, don’t read this book, it will probably cause you heartburn. Do. If you haven’t closed your mind to receiving truth from either science or religion, you’ll probably enjoy some intriguing theories which seem to lead in the direction of reconciling the conflicts. Don’t. If you are convinced that science—in practice—is totally objective and proven beyond any doubt, don’t read this book, it just might provoke you to anger. Do. If you recognize that the existence of God cannot be proved or disproved by science, you just might gain some intriguing insights.

30 review for Science and Religion: Reconciling the Conflicts

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    This is a much needed volume in the field of reconciling science and Biblical claims. The author has done an exceptional job in his research for this work, and his conclusions are enough to compel a more robust conversation between creationists and evolutionists. The scope of this book is not to give answers per se, rather, it is meant to raise more question as we think of how dependent we have become on things that are merely theory and hypothesis. Although the author has a differing worldview This is a much needed volume in the field of reconciling science and Biblical claims. The author has done an exceptional job in his research for this work, and his conclusions are enough to compel a more robust conversation between creationists and evolutionists. The scope of this book is not to give answers per se, rather, it is meant to raise more question as we think of how dependent we have become on things that are merely theory and hypothesis. Although the author has a differing worldview than mine, I appreciate his methodical and reasoned approach at getting to the real heart of the debate. Unmasking some of the holes in dating methods, and showing where scientists have peddled theories as facts are just two things he does in this volume to help us rethink this important issue. The book has an extensive bibliography, revealing how much time and care went into putting this volume together. In some places the science is "heavy" but Mr. Barker does a good job at making the information digestible. While I might quibble with the author over his method of dating the earth, I appreciate that he presents a reasonable model that doesn't just take the millions of years theory for granted. Whether you agree with his conclusions, worldview, or methods, this is a worthy read in a field the greatly needs informed voices to weigh in, and I am thankful Mr. Barker has done so!

  2. 4 out of 5

    LAWonder10

    In this remarkable work of science an religion combined, David Barker has successfully created a convincing argument for both science and religion. In order to be a scientist, or follow the paths of science, one can also be religious and believe in scriptures and a Higher Power. As some individuals and groups rebel against these truths, they cannot disprove the findings discussed in David Barker’s compilation of scientific theories. facts and blunders. I am impressed with the vast amount of resea In this remarkable work of science an religion combined, David Barker has successfully created a convincing argument for both science and religion. In order to be a scientist, or follow the paths of science, one can also be religious and believe in scriptures and a Higher Power. As some individuals and groups rebel against these truths, they cannot disprove the findings discussed in David Barker’s compilation of scientific theories. facts and blunders. I am impressed with the vast amount of research David has put into this incredible non-fiction work! He has objectively discussed changes of scientific views from recorded history to present day. He has pointed out truth and error in both past and present Religious and scientific belief. The author has gone into great detail pinpointing differences and how they can be reconciled. This is a book that is better appreciated by the scholar or elocutionist. For the commonplace reader, it can get quite mind boggling. Yet, it is a great book to keep accessible for future reference. It is well written and, if anything…too informative. I feel it would be of great value to more individuals and groups if it were somehow simplified without losing its credibility. For this reason alone I give it a Four and a Half Stars rating. I won this in a The Library Thing giveaway and was asked for an honest review, of which I have given.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jason Harris

    The author, an amateur scientist, comments capably on matters relating to the nexus between science and religion. While lacking some of the refinements of academia, Barker speaks with nuance and precision and embodies the scientific ideal admirably. His writing is carefully thought-out. His critique lacks that conspiratorial air that tends to permeate the discussion around this topic. Barker has done a service to us by producing this book which I hope will be beneficial to many who wish to pursue The author, an amateur scientist, comments capably on matters relating to the nexus between science and religion. While lacking some of the refinements of academia, Barker speaks with nuance and precision and embodies the scientific ideal admirably. His writing is carefully thought-out. His critique lacks that conspiratorial air that tends to permeate the discussion around this topic. Barker has done a service to us by producing this book which I hope will be beneficial to many who wish to pursue a scientific career and struggle with whether they can pursue such a career in science as a religious person. Particularly helpful is Barker's use of religious literature as historical documents. He includes not only the Protestant canon, but also the apocryphal writings and various other religious and secular sources. This treatment of ancient religious documents as at least ancient documents is long overdue in the discussion. Particularly unfortunate is Barker's extreme over-reliance on a few particular scientists. Also unfortunate is his odd doctrinal views (particularly relating to revelation), especially in the final chapters. It seems to become apparent only toward the end of the book that the author is Mormon and, come to find out (through independent research), the sources on which he relies most heavily (see above) are also Mormon. While this doesn't change the basic usefulness of the book, it does mean that Christians should read the book recognising that the arguments are useful as comments on science and religion in general, not Christianity in specific.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gerard J. Medvec

    In plain language, after excruciating research (34 pages of bibliography), David M. Barker's SCIENCE AND RELIGION narrows the quagmire-strewn distance between ancient and modern knowledge. Through clear-eyed observation and enough documentation to cast doubt, Barker systematically addresses the inconsistencies of science's refutation of Biblical historic claims. Countless examples drill wide holes in scientific "fact," as they brush away some of the sands of doubt over scriptural accuracy. Barke In plain language, after excruciating research (34 pages of bibliography), David M. Barker's SCIENCE AND RELIGION narrows the quagmire-strewn distance between ancient and modern knowledge. Through clear-eyed observation and enough documentation to cast doubt, Barker systematically addresses the inconsistencies of science's refutation of Biblical historic claims. Countless examples drill wide holes in scientific "fact," as they brush away some of the sands of doubt over scriptural accuracy. Barker's logic, and openness to challenge, fill this work front to back. The book spouts an Indiana Jones-like dare for a less narrow view of existence, and for an acknowledgment of unseen influences. But for any reader, the true test of scholarly work is its effect. My stand on topics like evolution, carbon-14 dating and comets, while accepting of minor alterations, has always stood firm with the science I'd "read or heard about," but never tested. No longer. SCIENCE AND RELIGION, to a uncertain degree, has changed my mind.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Richard Johnston

    I am a hobbiest stargazer and wonder at the marvels of the universe. I am reading this book for the second time because there is so much information that it is hard to remember all the personally resonating "good stuff". I have read many science periodicals and viewed many science documentaries over the years and have always been amazed that some intelligent people yearn to find other explanations for what has happened to the earth than what the ancients knew. Maybe it is because they don't want I am a hobbiest stargazer and wonder at the marvels of the universe. I am reading this book for the second time because there is so much information that it is hard to remember all the personally resonating "good stuff". I have read many science periodicals and viewed many science documentaries over the years and have always been amazed that some intelligent people yearn to find other explanations for what has happened to the earth than what the ancients knew. Maybe it is because they don't want to be responsible to anyone for the personal choices that they make. Now I don't have to be ashamed for quoting scripture when confronted by "conflicts". Before I met David I used to hear my dad rail on about how inaccurate tree ring counting and the carbon 14 dating method were. I have attended David's classes and am so glad to have his research together to refer to. This book is well worth waiting for.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Robb

    If you have ever questioned or simply been annoyed by the science community's presentation of ideas, theories, hypotheses & hunches as absolute fact or law, this book probably will appeal to you. If your personal belief system has room for both the concepts of a world planned and designed by a Creator as well as evolutionary and natural forces --- working together rather than in isolation --- this book probably will appeal to you. If all of the above apply to you, then this book DEFINITELY will ap If you have ever questioned or simply been annoyed by the science community's presentation of ideas, theories, hypotheses & hunches as absolute fact or law, this book probably will appeal to you. If your personal belief system has room for both the concepts of a world planned and designed by a Creator as well as evolutionary and natural forces --- working together rather than in isolation --- this book probably will appeal to you. If all of the above apply to you, then this book DEFINITELY will appeal to you. The author has done an excellent job of applying well-documented research to support the stance that science and religion need not provide mutually exclusive theories or beliefs with regard to the creation and development of Earth and its inhabitants. I loved it and recommend it to others with open and curious minds.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    It will be interesting when we all die, go to heaven and discover if the literal timeline in Genesis was correct. Some great quotes: P. 370 Both Plato and Aristotle, according to Jaeger, "placed inspiration above reason and moral insight . . because it comes from God" --for while reason is far from infallible, "the sureness of inspiration, on the other hand, is like lightening." (Nibley. The Ancient State. 1991, p. 326-329. P. 363 From Thomas Edison came: "We don't know a millionth of 1% about a It will be interesting when we all die, go to heaven and discover if the literal timeline in Genesis was correct. Some great quotes: P. 370 Both Plato and Aristotle, according to Jaeger, "placed inspiration above reason and moral insight . . because it comes from God" --for while reason is far from infallible, "the sureness of inspiration, on the other hand, is like lightening." (Nibley. The Ancient State. 1991, p. 326-329. P. 363 From Thomas Edison came: "We don't know a millionth of 1% about anything." (Investors Business Daily: July 16, 2009.) I read the preliminary version and just received a copy of the "official" book from the author. Very well done!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    I bought this book from the author after attending a community education class that he taught. He has done extensive research, and raised many doubts about so called facts and theories that have been established as though they were proven when they are far from it. He offers a number of possible alternative explanations for many major events in the history of the world, while being careful not to go the other extreme and claim that those alternative scenarios are necessarily valid. I find those I bought this book from the author after attending a community education class that he taught. He has done extensive research, and raised many doubts about so called facts and theories that have been established as though they were proven when they are far from it. He offers a number of possible alternative explanations for many major events in the history of the world, while being careful not to go the other extreme and claim that those alternative scenarios are necessarily valid. I find those other plausible explanations to have some merit; certainly many of them seem no more far-fetched than what is commonly accepted by science at this time. The author also documents many of the changes in science as to what is accepted as fact, emphasizing that an explanation of this world and its history has undergone many changes, with no reason to believe that it will not continue to constantly change as more knowledge comes to light. He covers such topics as carbon dating, evolution, the Great Flood, continental drift, catastrophic events vs. the theory of uniformity, etc. He comes to no final conclusions as to what has happened on this earth for the past 100 million years, but does emphasize that no one can say for a certainty how the history of the earth unfolded. So-called evidence in many cases has been presented as very clear when much of the research related to it is in actuality very vague. The information gathered and thoroughly studied by Mr. Barker certainly gives the Christian who believes the Bible to be literally true some ground to stand on.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    This was an interesting book to read. I was disappointed that the author is a hobbyist scientist rather than a credentialed one, but it did mean that he kept his mind open to some theories that are well outside the mainstream. Some of his chapters were fascinating, especially about the difference between a view of the world where everything happens gradually and incrementally versus a view of the world where things can be sped up greatly because of natural disasters and comets and such. A lot of h This was an interesting book to read. I was disappointed that the author is a hobbyist scientist rather than a credentialed one, but it did mean that he kept his mind open to some theories that are well outside the mainstream. Some of his chapters were fascinating, especially about the difference between a view of the world where everything happens gradually and incrementally versus a view of the world where things can be sped up greatly because of natural disasters and comets and such. A lot of his ideas tried to reconcile a more literal interpretation of the Bible with scientific evidence, and frankly, I didn't find many of his ideas compelling because I think some of the literal stuff doesn't need to be read literally. I prefer the approach of the podcasts I was listening to during the same time period I was reading this book. Found here, they are the presentations of faithful LDS scientists in many fields. Many of them see no conflict between what their field teaches and what the Bible teaches: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Having said that, this was a really interesting book and I felt it worth my time to read it and consider the ideas.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    David Barker's book deserves a much more detailed review than I am prepared to give right now. Suffice it to say that the book was engaging and informative, and I learned a lot that I didn't already know, even though I have explored and taught this topic quite extensively. He has amassed a great deal of information about the state of science as it relates to the conservative Christian interpretation of the Bible in regards to the creation, the age of the earth, evolution, Noah's ark, the flood, David Barker's book deserves a much more detailed review than I am prepared to give right now. Suffice it to say that the book was engaging and informative, and I learned a lot that I didn't already know, even though I have explored and taught this topic quite extensively. He has amassed a great deal of information about the state of science as it relates to the conservative Christian interpretation of the Bible in regards to the creation, the age of the earth, evolution, Noah's ark, the flood, etc. Much of his information is rather dated, especially in terms of the often rapid progress of scientific knowledge. He points out legitimate issues with science's tendency to elevate theory to dogma, and to take as "given" theories about aspects of the universe that are clearly unmeasurable and are based on a huge pile of assumptions. My biggest difference with Barker would be his defense of the "young earth" which in my understanding of both the scriptures and the revelations of modern-day prophets seems to me to be a non-issue.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tosha Holliman

    I won this book through a good reads giveaway. I was very excited to get this boo, and learn more about science and religion. From the time I was born I grew up in both a Baptist and a J.W family. My mothers side was Baptist so when I was with her parents I would go to my Uncles Church and go to Kingdom Hall with My dads parents. Therefore I grew up believing in a bunch of different beliefs. They are both drastically different, And I am one of the few that believes parts of both so I love learnin I won this book through a good reads giveaway. I was very excited to get this boo, and learn more about science and religion. From the time I was born I grew up in both a Baptist and a J.W family. My mothers side was Baptist so when I was with her parents I would go to my Uncles Church and go to Kingdom Hall with My dads parents. Therefore I grew up believing in a bunch of different beliefs. They are both drastically different, And I am one of the few that believes parts of both so I love learning as much about different perspectives of religion. It was a breath of fresh air and I would highly recommend science and religion to everyone! Wonderfully written and very interesting.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    Barker explores the seeming inconsistencies between the use of science which is based on observation and testing and religion which is based on faith. He discusses the standards of both and attempts to reconcile the differences. The different modes of aging the Earth are evaluated and compared to information in the Bible. The work contains numerous footnotes, quotes, and charts. A thoughtful read. This was a free electronic download from the author.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I won a copy of this book in a first reads giveaway. This book goes a long way to showing that scientific fact and biblical truth are NOT mutually incompatible.

  14. 4 out of 5

    vicks

    I thought it was brilliantly written. Quite fascinating regarding fossils, and super novas.Couldn't put it down. I thought it was brilliantly written. Quite fascinating regarding fossils, and super novas.Couldn't put it down.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Skylar

    My cynical side says, "This is preaching to the choir." For those who are in the choir of creationism, this book aims to give you reassurance and ammunition for your beliefs. For someone not in the choir, it wasn't very interesting to read about how besieged "we" are. That besieging may be true, but I also wonder whether it is deserved, and that makes me part of the enemy. It just wasn't fair to the author for me to sit there mentally arguing with him, so I stopped reading. I'm a religious Jew, a My cynical side says, "This is preaching to the choir." For those who are in the choir of creationism, this book aims to give you reassurance and ammunition for your beliefs. For someone not in the choir, it wasn't very interesting to read about how besieged "we" are. That besieging may be true, but I also wonder whether it is deserved, and that makes me part of the enemy. It just wasn't fair to the author for me to sit there mentally arguing with him, so I stopped reading. I'm a religious Jew, and I don't think that science (including evolution) is contrary to science in either principle or fact. Can you make a literal description of the creation of all that is, was, and will be in a few hundred paltry words created by man? I don't believe human language is capable of such a feat, inspired or not. However, for the literalist who doesn't want to give up on science, check out books by Gerald Schroeder. In particular, his theory of how theoretical physics can reconcile 6 days and billions of years is downright beautiful if you can understand it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    I received this as a first-reads from Goodreads. I wanted to like this book but just couldn't. It is decently researched and for the most part well written. My problem with the writing is there is an overuse of block quotes that interrupt the flow. Also I am just not the target audience for the book. I hold to a much looser chronology of the bible than Barker does and for the most part do not hold it as literally as he does. I also found most of the science he covers to be on the basic side and I received this as a first-reads from Goodreads. I wanted to like this book but just couldn't. It is decently researched and for the most part well written. My problem with the writing is there is an overuse of block quotes that interrupt the flow. Also I am just not the target audience for the book. I hold to a much looser chronology of the bible than Barker does and for the most part do not hold it as literally as he does. I also found most of the science he covers to be on the basic side and things i learned in the first year of college, to fully disclose I have a BS in environmental science and an MS in industrial hygiene. For books and articles on science and religion I would recommend books and articles by John C. Polkinghorne.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Phil Clymer

    The author uses a poor imitation of scientific-style writing in an attempt to discredit any science that stands contrary to the 6,000 year age limit of the earth imposed by the Biblical book of Genesis. He has limited knowledge of the science materials, his statements are inaccurate and misleading, and contain nothing of substance. Author should leave science writing to the professionals.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    I found it very interesting in the explanation of when we pass away and the things we will find in heaven. It also helps us understand how we are all just so dependent of everything that goes around us that we forget and forgot that there is a God and that we will if we regret our sins and redeem ourselves with God we will see that beautiful life that God has for us in Heaven.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Written by my father in law!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Penny

  21. 5 out of 5

    Janine Brouillette

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anzala Khan

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gerald Madsen

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mack Douglass

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amine

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  29. 4 out of 5

    Victor

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aileen

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