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Queen of the Demonweb Pits

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Revisiting classic adventures has been extremely successful. "Queen of the Demonweb Pits" was one of the most popular adventures ever created for the Dungeons & Dragons game. This novelization appeals to those who have played through the adventure, as well as to those who have an interest in drow elves--one of the most popular races in the game. Revisiting classic adventures has been extremely successful. "Queen of the Demonweb Pits" was one of the most popular adventures ever created for the Dungeons & Dragons game. This novelization appeals to those who have played through the adventure, as well as to those who have an interest in drow elves--one of the most popular races in the game.


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Revisiting classic adventures has been extremely successful. "Queen of the Demonweb Pits" was one of the most popular adventures ever created for the Dungeons & Dragons game. This novelization appeals to those who have played through the adventure, as well as to those who have an interest in drow elves--one of the most popular races in the game. Revisiting classic adventures has been extremely successful. "Queen of the Demonweb Pits" was one of the most popular adventures ever created for the Dungeons & Dragons game. This novelization appeals to those who have played through the adventure, as well as to those who have an interest in drow elves--one of the most popular races in the game.

30 review for Queen of the Demonweb Pits

  1. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    Kidd's interpretation of the original material feels especially bombastic and freewheeling. The character concepts are especially outlandish and personalities are especially outsized, and he draws in quite a bit of weird kink between the interspecies romances and the need for "perfect butt" Escalla to go naked for a good portion of the time. It's quite a thing for an author of tie-in series fiction to go right for the broad comedy when his peers seem to go for the grim and dour. I don't think tha Kidd's interpretation of the original material feels especially bombastic and freewheeling. The character concepts are especially outlandish and personalities are especially outsized, and he draws in quite a bit of weird kink between the interspecies romances and the need for "perfect butt" Escalla to go naked for a good portion of the time. It's quite a thing for an author of tie-in series fiction to go right for the broad comedy when his peers seem to go for the grim and dour. I don't think that he quite lands on everything he tries: the tone whipsaws between the comic aspects/personalities and the fact that the demon hordes are in fact committing atrocities and that Lolth herself is one way craaaazeee violent lady. There's a manic aspect to the running gags--"Trust me, I'm a fairy!"--that only starts to grate with repetition, and I don't know how the characters are supposed to tolerate Polk's personality problems outside of a secret, shallow grave. Like the previous Greyhawk Classics line, Kidd has the impossible task of taking an elaborate and historied setting--a location where the inhabitants sit around waiting for the player characters to show up--and has to fabricate events and motives. The result in this case is not bad because it implies the preceding events of Descent into the Depths of the Earth and a pre-made motive for Lolth to get involved. But there is, of course, a certain point where the protagonists find themselves inside the Demonweb Pits of the title and from then on it is "Dungeon Crawl Ahoy!" with great fidelity to the source material, meaning replicating traps and side-ventures and call outs. Curiously, Kidd took a throwaway character from the module, a "Type V demon"--marilith, although that word is never used--who is the secretary / hostess of the mechanical spider palace, and expanded this into the tanar'ri secretary, Morag, the breakout character of the entire story. How do you plot against someone to whom you cannot lie and must obey totally?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    Queen of the Demonweb Pits is the fifth of seven novels set in the Greyhawk D&D setting and the third (and final) to follow the adventures of The Justicar, Escalla the Faerie and the rest of their odd bunch of heroes. This book picks up shortly after "Descent into the Depths of the Earth" and is the story about Loth's desire for revenge and how the band of heroes are forced to confront the Spider Queen once and for all. Like the other books in the series this is a novelization of a famous D&D Mo Queen of the Demonweb Pits is the fifth of seven novels set in the Greyhawk D&D setting and the third (and final) to follow the adventures of The Justicar, Escalla the Faerie and the rest of their odd bunch of heroes. This book picks up shortly after "Descent into the Depths of the Earth" and is the story about Loth's desire for revenge and how the band of heroes are forced to confront the Spider Queen once and for all. Like the other books in the series this is a novelization of a famous D&D Module of the same name. Like the others the dungeon crawl part of the adventure follows the flow of the module and evokes memories of late night D&D sessions. Of the Greyhawk novels the ones with the Justicar are my favorites. The books have an nice blend of story telling without being overly serious.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Blind_guardian

    Read this some years back, and it says something about how forgettable it is that I only now recalled it after someone posted about the author in a Facebook group. While I do enjoy Lolth and the Drow, the party of adventurers was bizarre and just weird. I might have enjoyed it more if I had read any of the 5 books previous to it, but this was a very bad jumping-on point. Plus, most of the characters are annoying enough that I don't think I really want to go through 5 more books of these guys. Es Read this some years back, and it says something about how forgettable it is that I only now recalled it after someone posted about the author in a Facebook group. While I do enjoy Lolth and the Drow, the party of adventurers was bizarre and just weird. I might have enjoyed it more if I had read any of the 5 books previous to it, but this was a very bad jumping-on point. Plus, most of the characters are annoying enough that I don't think I really want to go through 5 more books of these guys. Especially that stupid sex-crazed fairy. It says something when the most likeable character is someone's talking cloak made out of a skinned hellhound. Doubt if I'll read anything else by this author. Most authors have one chance to impress me and if they blow it, there's too many other good authors out there to waste time with them. It wasn't Jane Eyre-bad, but it was pretty lame.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Frank Trek Davis

    Another crazy adventure featuring Jus' and Escala with old and new pals. I enjoyed this one but not as much as the first two. The details of the adventure seemed to be driven by comedy alone and some of the jokes might be getting a bit tired. It's still a fun romp and I am disappointed that this is the last novel featuring these unlikely heroes. Another crazy adventure featuring Jus' and Escala with old and new pals. I enjoyed this one but not as much as the first two. The details of the adventure seemed to be driven by comedy alone and some of the jokes might be getting a bit tired. It's still a fun romp and I am disappointed that this is the last novel featuring these unlikely heroes.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    Listened to this on Audible audiobook - another in the series based on classic D&D modules. This story was not as engaging as the previous ones in the series, but it was still enjoyable - recommended if you enjoyed the others in the series!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dennis

    Most D&D books are good mainly for nostalgia. Queen of the Demonweb Pits is quite good, actually, both entertaining and quick moving. I will look for more of Kidd's books. Most D&D books are good mainly for nostalgia. Queen of the Demonweb Pits is quite good, actually, both entertaining and quick moving. I will look for more of Kidd's books.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Warreni

    This is the second novel-length adaptation of a classic D&D module I've read and I wasn't too impressed with it. Q1 was a module for a party in the level range of 10 - 14 and it was an adventure that was epic in scope, leading one on a journey through the Abyss to the lair of Lolth, goddess of the drow. The characters in Kidd's novel engage in a somewhat similar journey within the context of the Greyhawk setting (which was not, as I recall, especially well fleshed-out at the time the original mod This is the second novel-length adaptation of a classic D&D module I've read and I wasn't too impressed with it. Q1 was a module for a party in the level range of 10 - 14 and it was an adventure that was epic in scope, leading one on a journey through the Abyss to the lair of Lolth, goddess of the drow. The characters in Kidd's novel engage in a somewhat similar journey within the context of the Greyhawk setting (which was not, as I recall, especially well fleshed-out at the time the original modules were published). Kidd uses a motley crew of creatures as his protagonists, which is part of the problem. If you're expecting a group of typical adventurers including clerics, mages, thieves, and fighters of several races, you'll be surprised to encounter a ranger, his "apprentice", a talking badger, a sentient hell-hound hide, a fairy, a gymnosphinx and a fancy holy sword. This weird group of heroes manages, through the course of the adventure, to foil not just one but two gods (and to destroy one of them, while laying waste to the home plane of the other). The book has a deliberately (I say this because the final chapter is entitled "A Particularly Happy Ending") absurdly-happy ending. Some of the characters, intended to be quirky and endearing, instead tend to grate on one's nerves (Escalla in particular). The book does include allusions to some of the iconic traps of the adventure, such as the room with demons on floating columns 100' high and the demonweb itself but other things are oddly absent or greatly reduced in significance (the yochlol are relegated to a few brief sentences). Few of the obstacles seem to pose much of a challenge to a collection of characters who seem as though they'd have a hard time fighting their way out of a paper bag. On the whole this is a fairly disappointing re-imagining of the tale of the module; while I would expect that the story would require a certain amount of padding because modules represent an outline of a story told collectively by a group of people, this feels like a completely different and not terribly good story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dru

    Well, this was definitely my least favorite of the "Justicar" series in the module-to-novel books. Although better than the stinky "Keep on the Borderlands", this just didn't keep well enough to the module. Continuing on from "Descent into the Depths of the Earth" but adding a LOT of what I hated about that book, and really losing the whole train of the GDQ modules, this was 177 pages (out of 310) before our "party" got to the Abyss. What a load of CRAP! And they didn't get there the way you are Well, this was definitely my least favorite of the "Justicar" series in the module-to-novel books. Although better than the stinky "Keep on the Borderlands", this just didn't keep well enough to the module. Continuing on from "Descent into the Depths of the Earth" but adding a LOT of what I hated about that book, and really losing the whole train of the GDQ modules, this was 177 pages (out of 310) before our "party" got to the Abyss. What a load of CRAP! And they didn't get there the way you are supposed to from the module, which makes this all the worse. Blech and double blech about the whole stupid "Vampire Pool" and its role in defeating Lolth. All in all, this BARELY scrapes a 3 star...I may return and drop it to 2. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I'm putting this footer on all 7 of my reviews of "Greyhawk Classics", for consistency. Note that I read them them in LEVEL ORDER, not publication order. I wanted an overall review of the series of 8 in one spot, so here ya go: 1) (6th published) Keep on the Borderlands - Levels 1-3 : 2 stars 2) (4th published) The Temple of Elemental Evil - Levels 1-3 : 3 stars 3) (2nd published) White Plume Mountain - Levels 5-10 : 4 stars 4) (1st published) Against the Giants - Levels 8-12 : 3 stars 5) (3rd published) Descent into the Depths of the Earth - Levels 9-14 : 4 stars 6) (5th published) Queen of the Demonweb Pits - Levels 10-14 : 3 stars 7) (7th published) Tomb of Horrors - Levels 10-14 : 3 stars ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tomasz Bogusz

    Czytałem tę książkę jeszcze jako Mistrz Podziemi, a Mistrzowie Podziemi z ciekawskim okiem przyglądają się tego typu pozycjom. Znajome realia, znajome potwory, gadające miecze i barwna drużyna, szlachtująca wszystko na swojej drodze, a w między czasie kupa dobrych przygód. Jest to książka lekka i zaskakująco przyjemna, stanowiąca fajny zbiór inspiracji do sesji D&D.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    A really fun adventure, this book continues the adventures of the Justicar and his merry band through other planes while they chase after Lolth, all the while being hunted by old acquaintances. A wonderful final chapter to their stories.

  11. 5 out of 5

    James

    A book with action, adventure mystery and a great sense of humour. Every thing you need in a book right here.

  12. 5 out of 5

    JM

    The tone of this book is cartoony and I don't think it works at all. The tone of this book is cartoony and I don't think it works at all.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mateja Vidaković

  14. 5 out of 5

    Phil

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dave Barrack

  16. 4 out of 5

    matt westgate

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  18. 4 out of 5

    Wade

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  20. 4 out of 5

    Martin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Seth

  22. 5 out of 5

    Justin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Elmslie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Miranda

  25. 5 out of 5

    Slipfinger

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  27. 4 out of 5

    james whatley

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan L

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sabra Snider

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mike Mclatchey

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