web site hit counter Poetry as Experience - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Poetry as Experience

Availability: Ready to download

Lacoue-Labarthe's Poetry as Experience addresses the question of a lyric language that would not be the expression of subjectivity. In his analysis of the historical position of Paul Celan's poetry, Lacoue-Labarthe defines the subject as the principle that founds, organizes, and secures both cognition and action—a principle that turned, most violently during the twentieth Lacoue-Labarthe's Poetry as Experience addresses the question of a lyric language that would not be the expression of subjectivity. In his analysis of the historical position of Paul Celan's poetry, Lacoue-Labarthe defines the subject as the principle that founds, organizes, and secures both cognition and action—a principle that turned, most violently during the twentieth century, into a figure not only of domination but of the extermination of everything other than itself. This thoroughly universal, abstract, and finally suicidal subject eradicates all experience, save the singularity of this experience of voiding. But what is left, as Paul Celan insisted, is a remainder to the lyric voice alone: Singbarer Rest. Lacoue-Labarthe's detailed analyses of two decisive poems by Celan, "Tübingen, Jänner" and "Todtnauberg"—the one a response to Hölderlin, the other to Heidegger—and his sustained reading of "The Meridian" present Celan's verse of singularity as the movement at and beyond the border of generalizable experience, i.e., as an experience, a traversing of a dangerous field, in which language no longer dominates anything, but rather commemorates the voiding of concepts and the collapse of the constitutive powers of the subject. For Lacoue-Labarthe, poetry after the Shoah, the poetry of bared singularity, is no longer a poetry that would correspond to the concept of the subject—or, for that matter, to the concept of poetry—but is rather the language of the decept. Only by being disappointed of the heroic language of idealistic poetry, and of the mytho-ontological tendencies of philosophy, can Celan's poetry keep open the possibility of another history, another future.


Compare

Lacoue-Labarthe's Poetry as Experience addresses the question of a lyric language that would not be the expression of subjectivity. In his analysis of the historical position of Paul Celan's poetry, Lacoue-Labarthe defines the subject as the principle that founds, organizes, and secures both cognition and action—a principle that turned, most violently during the twentieth Lacoue-Labarthe's Poetry as Experience addresses the question of a lyric language that would not be the expression of subjectivity. In his analysis of the historical position of Paul Celan's poetry, Lacoue-Labarthe defines the subject as the principle that founds, organizes, and secures both cognition and action—a principle that turned, most violently during the twentieth century, into a figure not only of domination but of the extermination of everything other than itself. This thoroughly universal, abstract, and finally suicidal subject eradicates all experience, save the singularity of this experience of voiding. But what is left, as Paul Celan insisted, is a remainder to the lyric voice alone: Singbarer Rest. Lacoue-Labarthe's detailed analyses of two decisive poems by Celan, "Tübingen, Jänner" and "Todtnauberg"—the one a response to Hölderlin, the other to Heidegger—and his sustained reading of "The Meridian" present Celan's verse of singularity as the movement at and beyond the border of generalizable experience, i.e., as an experience, a traversing of a dangerous field, in which language no longer dominates anything, but rather commemorates the voiding of concepts and the collapse of the constitutive powers of the subject. For Lacoue-Labarthe, poetry after the Shoah, the poetry of bared singularity, is no longer a poetry that would correspond to the concept of the subject—or, for that matter, to the concept of poetry—but is rather the language of the decept. Only by being disappointed of the heroic language of idealistic poetry, and of the mytho-ontological tendencies of philosophy, can Celan's poetry keep open the possibility of another history, another future.

30 review for Poetry as Experience

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Yusuf

    ان التجربة عند هيدغر هي ثلاثة أجزاء تلقي ومعرفة و تحول و هي ما تحرك خلاله الناقد الفرنسي لابارث لحكاية قصة تسيلان الشعرية فالشعر الذي افترضه كائن يملي على الإنسان ويحوله كأنه اخر بداخله ينتقل من التواصل معه إلى تغييره وهذا الكائن الغريب عنا هو تجربة نعيشها في الوقت ذاته ، ان تسيلان بعد اوشفيتز يتم تصويره كمحارب بيده قصيدة أحتكاك النقد الفرنسي بالتأويل الألماني شئ مثير للاهتمام ولكنه يضيف لعبات لغوية زائدة إلى هذه الفلسفة التفكيكية وعلاقة هيدغر بتسيلان تظل تتكرر في قراءاتي ثانية و نوعا ما أحببت ه ان التجربة عند هيدغر هي ثلاثة أجزاء تلقي ومعرفة و تحول و هي ما تحرك خلاله الناقد الفرنسي لابارث لحكاية قصة تسيلان الشعرية فالشعر الذي افترضه كائن يملي على الإنسان ويحوله كأنه اخر بداخله ينتقل من التواصل معه إلى تغييره وهذا الكائن الغريب عنا هو تجربة نعيشها في الوقت ذاته ، ان تسيلان بعد اوشفيتز يتم تصويره كمحارب بيده قصيدة أحتكاك النقد الفرنسي بالتأويل الألماني شئ مثير للاهتمام ولكنه يضيف لعبات لغوية زائدة إلى هذه الفلسفة التفكيكية وعلاقة هيدغر بتسيلان تظل تتكرر في قراءاتي ثانية و نوعا ما أحببت هذا الهوس عند النقاد بربط حكاياتهما معا

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine

    I think that this is brilliant. It can be abstruse, but read intuitively and you realise it's a desperate attempt to articulate what we've been feeling about poetry all along. That, in my view, is the essence of good criticism -- the desperation to say, somehow or other, how art affects us. Or non-art, since in this book Lacoue-Labarthe talks about how art is the unheimliche, and how Celan seemingly dialectically opposes 'the human' to that -- how this dialectic is not even a dialectic because p I think that this is brilliant. It can be abstruse, but read intuitively and you realise it's a desperate attempt to articulate what we've been feeling about poetry all along. That, in my view, is the essence of good criticism -- the desperation to say, somehow or other, how art affects us. Or non-art, since in this book Lacoue-Labarthe talks about how art is the unheimliche, and how Celan seemingly dialectically opposes 'the human' to that -- how this dialectic is not even a dialectic because poetry is not the other of art ['the human' is not the anti-thesis of 'art'] but rather takes place within art itself. The difference of art from itself. What he says is quite true, that speaking is forgetting the human, when you speak you forget who you are -- utterance alienates. The challenge is to speak without speaking, to remember, to preserve singularity and to retain, in that, openness. This talks about the deterioration of the subject (wrt lyric poetry) -- the shift from the focus on 'the subject' to the possibility of address, in that sense *shifting* the attention from 'self' to 'other'. But phillippe lacoue-labarth is careful to say that this shift, in addressing a person (I avoid 'subject' due to theoretical problems) while open to alterity, is openness and NOT alterity, though always threatened by the fact that alterity might overwhelm. An address to being, which is nothingness -- not alterity. He talks about JF Lyotard's sublime and criticises it for talking about the unrepresentable as 'beyond representation' -- that already 'stabilises it' and turns it into the *unpresented*. That IS quite true. He asks us to think of poetry as a *movement* (it occurs to me this is useful for irony), a gesture. The movement of relating self to other (the act of defining them, by negative definition) is a more primal difference than the difference between self and other. Specifically it is a DIFFERANCE, in Derrida's terms 'the gift of the other within the same', as Lacoue-Labarth so smoothly puts it (structurally, also the difference of art within itself). The argument is very very neat. I think, though, that this is very difficult to read without some knowledge of Blanchot, Derrida, Freud and Heidegger. That is probably the drawback. I don't blame him -- these things are not easy to articulate. It ends with a quote from Anna Akhmatova's Requiem, which I find very touching: http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/requiem/ I think that it is a GREAT book for pausing and thinking what our experience of much art is -- and what the often abused concepts of 'transcendence' and 'beauty' actually mean.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Genjiro

    Lacoue-Labarthe, like his associate Nancy, can be impossible reading without having some cursory understanding of the larger field of references. Even so, the rigor of his analysis and the subject matter make for an illuminating encounter. I started re-reading this book, one I picked up several years ago and put down after a dozen pages, but this time I feel a stronger identification with the contents of his discourse having read some of Celan and Holderlin's poetry, and the recently published w Lacoue-Labarthe, like his associate Nancy, can be impossible reading without having some cursory understanding of the larger field of references. Even so, the rigor of his analysis and the subject matter make for an illuminating encounter. I started re-reading this book, one I picked up several years ago and put down after a dozen pages, but this time I feel a stronger identification with the contents of his discourse having read some of Celan and Holderlin's poetry, and the recently published work based on the encounter between Heidegger and Celan.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Calum

    Provocative, questioning rumination on Celan, Holderlin and the possibility of saying, of connecting, and the meaning of poetry.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ammon

    The importance of Celan for French Heideggerians cannot be overstated.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lee Sharks

  7. 4 out of 5

    Murat Yıldız

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  9. 4 out of 5

    Steel

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Lee

  11. 5 out of 5

    kathryn

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alessio

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rick

  16. 4 out of 5

    Raphae

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lyle Enright

  18. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  19. 4 out of 5

    .

  20. 4 out of 5

    david

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emerson Vieira

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laurence Kirmayer

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shelby Canterbury

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dominic

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Ekoko

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  30. 5 out of 5

    Josip Cmrečnjak

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.