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The Shadow of the Almighty Feaures the life story of missionary Jim Elliot, who was murdered in Ecuador. Full description


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The Shadow of the Almighty Feaures the life story of missionary Jim Elliot, who was murdered in Ecuador. Full description

30 review for The Shadow Of The Almighty (Authentic Classics)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Vellacott

    "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep, to gain that which he cannot lose." This book could be read as a prequel to Through Gates of Splendor, also by Elisabeth Elliot. It is basically a biography of the life of Jim Elliot, from the perspective of his wife, his lengthy and detailed journals and his letters to his family/friends. Jim Elliot's life was cut tragically short when he and four fellow missionaries were murdered by the Auca Indians in 1956 during one of their first outreaches to "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep, to gain that which he cannot lose." This book could be read as a prequel to Through Gates of Splendor, also by Elisabeth Elliot. It is basically a biography of the life of Jim Elliot, from the perspective of his wife, his lengthy and detailed journals and his letters to his family/friends. Jim Elliot's life was cut tragically short when he and four fellow missionaries were murdered by the Auca Indians in 1956 during one of their first outreaches to them. This story is told in Through Gates of Splendor. On reading about Jim's school life and growing experiences, I was impressed with his dedication to personal holiness and spiritual discipline. Also, his desire to understand the Bible for himself through thorough study rather than relying on, and adopting the viewpoints of, other respected Christians. Most of us tend to do the latter, often to our detriment, especially when it comes to apologetics as we are unable to effectively express our viewpoints/defend our faith as we haven't studied it in sufficient detail, or been persuaded ourselves what we believe. Elliot diligently and persistently studied the Word often adopting viewpoints that went completely against the grain at the time. He refused to get involved in leading a political group in school. He sought also to use every minute of his time wisely and only got himself involved in those things that would forward God's Kingdom in some aspect or another. Through reading his diaries it is clear that his dogmatic views changed over time but his heart was always to follow Scripture regardless the cost to his personal reputation. We can all learn from his example. Somewhat strangely Elliot seemed to become less effective/less dedicated when he actually went to a foreign mission field. Whether this was because he faced all kinds of difficulties; building swept away in typhoon weather, various deaths, potential colleagues marrying and remaining at home, or whether it was because God was expecting him to live more by faith as he matured spiritually, I don't know. His decision to go into Auca territory with the other men is an interesting one. I'm sure this has been debated endlessly. The author (his wife) was at first unsure and asked him whether he was sure that God led him into this decision. He confirmed that this was the case and then proceeded. Whether or not it was the right decision, I'm sure that Elliot believed it was and God has obviously used his testimony (and that of the others that died) for many years after his death. It is rare to read of someone so sold out for Jesus and this should be an inspiration/challenge to us all. Earthly things were of no consequence to Elliot and he spoke a lot about his frustrations in having to maneuver them. You will wonder then why I'm only giving this 3 stars. Whilst Elliot's life was interesting and his devotional life a challenge I found the style of the book hard going and much too detailed in places. Lengthy journal extracts and letters about flora and fauna, Elliot's personal spiritual experiences, details of his growing attachment to Elisabeth, may be exciting reading for his wife and family but I found it a struggle not to lose interest. For his life and dedication I would rate it 4 stars. Recommended for those with an interest in mission/missionaries. This is clean; free of bad language and sexual content. There is a little violence on the field and also some death scenes but nothing too graphic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol Bakker

    4.5 stars (re-read) One of my lifetime reading goals is to read through Elisabeth Elliot's oeuvre. I was delighted to find this audiobook available through my library, even more so because Elisabeth, with her steady, low, modulated voice, was the narrator. She so passionately loved Jim; her respect and affection shines both in her diction and in her voice. Jim's grasp of language was impressive; the descriptions of his travels were lyrical. Jim Elliot. A dynamic and direct (and dogmatic?) man. His 4.5 stars (re-read) One of my lifetime reading goals is to read through Elisabeth Elliot's oeuvre. I was delighted to find this audiobook available through my library, even more so because Elisabeth, with her steady, low, modulated voice, was the narrator. She so passionately loved Jim; her respect and affection shines both in her diction and in her voice. Jim's grasp of language was impressive; the descriptions of his travels were lyrical. Jim Elliot. A dynamic and direct (and dogmatic?) man. His intensity, his burning zeal ... made me shift in my seat, a bit uncomfortable, I'll admit. I admire him. If he had lived to threescore and ten, would his tone have modulated, I wonder? The way he made decisions, the dichotomy he made between spiritual and secular, and his rejection of the ceremony and pageantry of weddings were other areas that made me squirm. I was cheering when he loosened up the last half of his senior year at college. The close-knit fabric of his family life as seen through his letters is lovely. I had forgotten that his dad was able to come to Ecuador to help him with some construction projects. What a precious gift that time was. I was raised in the shadow of Jim and Betty Elliot. My family were part of the Plymouth Brethren chapel Jim had attended (whose complacency he complained about!) while a student at Wheaton College. Jim's uncle, a man who radiated enthusiasm and was ever so kind to me, was an elder; Jim's cousin currently employs several of my family members. I went to Bible college with Jim's niece. My Harper aunts were schoolmates with Betty Howard at DuBose, a boarding school in Florida. When my Aunt Betty died in South Africa, I inherited her personal effects. Among them, I found this picture. Fun quote: He sought the help of older Christians in learning to live for God. And there were occasions when he asked them to pray with him. Of one of these he wrote, "Had fellowship in prayer with Brother Harper and discussion of the things of God. A happy experience." <-- that's my Grandpa! Next up to read is Valerie Elliot Shepard's book, Devotedly: The Personal Letters and Love Story of Jim & Elisabeth Elliot I re-watched Elisabeth Elliot's funeral at Gordon College, throat-lumping through it all, especially relishing her brothers' reflections.

  3. 4 out of 5

    G.M. Burrow

    Jim Elliot's short, powerful life reminded me of what Christ's own life showed first: we are all born to die. It's up to us whether our lives simply peter out (result of the Fall and all that) or whether we find an altar, choose a cross, draw a line, pick an Alamo, raise a flag, and say, "Here. For this. For this I will give my life." One decision, many moments, throughout all the life God gives us. Jim Elliot's short, powerful life reminded me of what Christ's own life showed first: we are all born to die. It's up to us whether our lives simply peter out (result of the Fall and all that) or whether we find an altar, choose a cross, draw a line, pick an Alamo, raise a flag, and say, "Here. For this. For this I will give my life." One decision, many moments, throughout all the life God gives us.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mari Mauries

    It is difficult to find a story that stirs the soul quite like Jim Elliot's. His life reads just like a novel, and yet is all the more compelling knowing it really happened. He was a husband, a father, a missionary, and a martyr by the age of twenty-eight; most people do not live such a full life. The author and wife of Jim Elliot tells his story primarily through his own letters and journal entries, rather than her own narration, allowing the reader to dig deep into the mind and heart of Elliot It is difficult to find a story that stirs the soul quite like Jim Elliot's. His life reads just like a novel, and yet is all the more compelling knowing it really happened. He was a husband, a father, a missionary, and a martyr by the age of twenty-eight; most people do not live such a full life. The author and wife of Jim Elliot tells his story primarily through his own letters and journal entries, rather than her own narration, allowing the reader to dig deep into the mind and heart of Elliot without the distraction of author bias. Her goal is to tell his story plainly, without dramatizing any points - not even his terrible and sudden death at the hands of the savage Auca Indians. It is Jim Elliot's poetry and eccentric writing style that give Shadow of the Almighty its novel-like appeal. As with any biography, the reader is first and foremost acquainted with who Jim Elliot was, what made him the man he was by the time he died. However, just as Elliot chose a life dead to the attention and applause of this world, his story is not meant to persuade the reader to admire him, but the One after whom he patterned his entire existence. Every time I set the book down, I found myself thinking more intensely about what it means to be a follower of Christ. The book as a whole is essentially one man's example of true Biblical Christianity, something long forgotten in this country yet desperately needed. I would certainly recommend this book both to Christians seeking a more noble vision for the believer's life and non-Christians who feel called to a greater purpose than what the world has to offer. Elisabeth Elliot's straightforward and unassuming commentary and Jim Elliot's inspiring, convicting words make this a very worthwhile read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Regina

    This book was difficult and troubling to read throughout since one knows the painful end from the beginning. It didn't help that the pages were filled with Jim's allusions to lives poured out for God early, for his own readiness for death. Was this premonition or youthful romance and bravado? Beyond this aspect, however, I found the first two-thirds of the book down right disturbing on a personal basis. I felt that I did not like Jim Eliot and I suffered a dichotomy of soul to think that I did no This book was difficult and troubling to read throughout since one knows the painful end from the beginning. It didn't help that the pages were filled with Jim's allusions to lives poured out for God early, for his own readiness for death. Was this premonition or youthful romance and bravado? Beyond this aspect, however, I found the first two-thirds of the book down right disturbing on a personal basis. I felt that I did not like Jim Eliot and I suffered a dichotomy of soul to think that I did not like this fellow saint with whom I will spend eternity. I found him to be rather sanctimonious, as another reviewer has said, as well as judgmental and legalistic. I found his purple, King James-type prose to be pretentious and annoying. Throughout his college years he anguished and moaned about how sluggish and stale the American church was and how little worth was held in his studies or any other kind of work. He did not share the Reformed and Puritan views that all respectable work that is done as unto the Lord is wholly acceptable to Him. I found Jim's view quite snobbish. Further, I was completely befuddled by his failure to ACT. I believe that this failure must have been directly influenced by his denominational (Plymouth Brethren) practices. Apparently, the Brethren are Quaker-like in their worship services. There is no appointed minister and everyone sits around waiting to be inspired to speak or read or sing. (Jim also shared in common with the Quakers a passivity which he felt precluded him from participation in the military or in government or civic affairs.) This "waiting attitude" seemed to bleed over into the rest of Jim's life. After he graduated from college he went home and kind of just helped around the house while he waited to be called to Christian service, even though he clearly had a keen desire to go to the mission field. It seems as if he was awaiting an engraved invitation to serve. He also spent years declaring that he must deny himself a wife, despite the fact that the Lord had clearly provided a woman that he loved and who also happened to be called to the same mission field as he. These pages and pages of self-denial tasted so much of self-flagellation that it became excruciating to read. I so wanted to put this book down. I so dreaded and yet couldn't resist reading it. I was rewarded for my perseverance. When Jim finally allowed himself to ACT on the desires that God had put into his heart and the opportunities that God opened up for him, he blossomed like one of the flowers of which he was so fond. It became a joy and pleasure to watch him grow through the pages of his journal - to let go of that romantic, angst-ridden prose, and the bemoaning of his unfulfilled desires. It is very evident that the Lord placed the desire for mission work in Ecuador in Jim's heart. It was a joy to see Jim's happiness blossom. He still continued for a while to deny himself the wife God had placed right in front of him. The reasons he gave for his failure to act were that God had not allowed it. I am still bewildered at this. My belief is that if God puts a desire in our hearts and provides the fulfillment, he means for us to take hold of it, not to stand back and ask ourselves if this is what God wants for our lives. (With the caveat that the desired object meets godly and biblical prerequisites, which the mission field and the wife did.) It is still very unclear to me, when Jim accepted God's gifts, what it was that finally made it okay. At any rate, Jim's personal and spiritual growth were so evidenced in the later pages of the book that one can begin to see the early parts as what they were - evidence of youthful angst, zeal and romance. Thank God that no one has access to any of the journals I may have written during that part of my life. Jim was growing into a wonderful husband and father and a man of God that could appreciate the gifts he had been given. I ache to think that some of that leftover zeal could have caused impatience in dealing with the Aucas, but as is true in all things, God had a plan and He was able to work good.

  6. 5 out of 5

    J M Padoc

    Rating is based solely on the writing. The format of telling most of Jim Elliot's story from his own words in journals and letters is effective, I suppose, but ends up rather dry. Oddly, I found Mr. Elliot's writing poetic and compelling at times. I wonder if Mrs. Elliot could have simply relied on his own words too much? Perhaps she could have summarized more events. As for the person of Mr. Elliot . . . One cannot read a biography without forming at least a cursory opinion of the subject. If the Rating is based solely on the writing. The format of telling most of Jim Elliot's story from his own words in journals and letters is effective, I suppose, but ends up rather dry. Oddly, I found Mr. Elliot's writing poetic and compelling at times. I wonder if Mrs. Elliot could have simply relied on his own words too much? Perhaps she could have summarized more events. As for the person of Mr. Elliot . . . One cannot read a biography without forming at least a cursory opinion of the subject. If the rating were based on my opinion of Mr. Elliot, it might be different. I think if I had known Mr. Elliot in real life, I would have found him rather sanctimonious and occasionally a bit of a thug. The account of him and his friend shooting a duck in Portland, only to find out that it was a pet duck, disturbed me--not because the duck died, but because the young men simply hid from the weeping owner and just prayed that she would be comforted. I find that thuggish behavior, but the tone of the book suggests that we should wink and shake our heads and say "boys will be boys." In addition, Mr. Elliot made it clear that he would register as a conscientious objector should he be drafted. I confess that I do NOT understand at all this religious objection to defending freedom. It's interesting to note that I read a biography of George and Martha Washington at the same time I read this biography, and I would consider George Washington to have had as deep and abiding a faith as Mr. Elliot had. Mr. Washington, however, considered it an obligation to serve his country by defending the budding United States from tyranny--and indeed, several prominent Quakers left their sect and their pacifism to fight against the British in the Revolutionary War. So while I suppose I can respect Mr. Elliot's strength of conviction, I do not understand it, and I suspect that he would have been mightily offended by Mr. Washington's ability to reconcile his faith with serving in war. On the other hand, I have the deepest and most profound respect for Mr. Elliot's service to the kingdom of God. And I confess--as one who does not experience the voice of God except through His Word, I am rather jealous of someone who could be so completely convinced of his calling and his duty. In addition, I think that his assessment of the church in America was deadly accurate, and I found his criticism of the way we practice Christianity here a biting indictment that has only proven itself even more true in the intervening decades since he penned his comments. Finally, while I did find Mr. Elliot personally a bit offensive (really? He couldn't change diapers because he believed in the "division of labor"? And he considered staying with his daughter "babysitting"?), I also do believe that he seemed to be growing into a more mellow, more palatable person as he aged. Had he lived past the age of 28, he may have eventually been someone that I could have tolerated in adulthood. In any case, I'm glad I read it, and I will likely make time to read "Through the Gates of Splendor" eventually.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tori Samar

    "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose." "Jim left for me, in memory, and for us all, in these letters and diaries, the testimony of a man who sought nothing but the will of God, who prayed that his life would be 'an exhibit to the value of knowing God.'" This is an inspiring biography, and I don't use that description lightly. This book hit me with particular force because Jim Elliot was just a year older than I am right now when he was killed in missionary serv "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose." "Jim left for me, in memory, and for us all, in these letters and diaries, the testimony of a man who sought nothing but the will of God, who prayed that his life would be 'an exhibit to the value of knowing God.'" This is an inspiring biography, and I don't use that description lightly. This book hit me with particular force because Jim Elliot was just a year older than I am right now when he was killed in missionary service. The passion and commitment to God he manifested up to that point was equally compelling, causing me to stop and evaluate myself. What am I doing with my life, however much of it God chooses to give me? Does it reach even 1% of the passion for God and for the lost that Jim Elliot had? Am I willing to give what I cannot keep to gain what I cannot lose? So, as one young person reading about how another young person devoted his life to pursuing the will of God and the glory of God among those who have never known Him⁠—that is truly inspirational reading for me. By the world’s standards, Jim Elliot’s twenty-eight years were far too short. But he did much for the sake of the name in that time, and though he is dead, he still speaks. Thankful for biographies like these.

  8. 5 out of 5

    The other John

    This one's a biography of Jim Elliot, a missionary who was killed on the job in Equador back in 1956. Whereas the Woodrow Wilson biography I read preceding this one was a well crafted story, Shadow is more a collection of diary and correspondence excerpts, weaved together by a bit of narrative. I'm not quite sure how much I like the book. Overall, Jim Elliot came across as a sanctimonious young lad, quick to speak the word of Law to his peers and himself. Of course, I'm not quite sure how much o This one's a biography of Jim Elliot, a missionary who was killed on the job in Equador back in 1956. Whereas the Woodrow Wilson biography I read preceding this one was a well crafted story, Shadow is more a collection of diary and correspondence excerpts, weaved together by a bit of narrative. I'm not quite sure how much I like the book. Overall, Jim Elliot came across as a sanctimonious young lad, quick to speak the word of Law to his peers and himself. Of course, I'm not quite sure how much of that negative perspective flows from his youthful attitudes or how much flows from guilt over my own shortcomings. Jim Elliot was more faithful in his lifetime than I've been, even though I've had almost twice as much time to get it right. Lord, have mercy! Anyway, the life of Jim Elliot is a tale that should be told. I just not sure that Shadow of the Almighty is the best way to tell it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marla O'Fallon

    "I see clearly now that anything, whatever it is, if it be not on the principle of grace, it is not of God. Here shall be my plea in weakness; here shall be my boldness in prayer; here shall be my deliverance in temptation; at last, here shall be my translation. Not of grace? Then not of God." "I think there is nothing so startling in all the graces of God as His quietness." "We have found great joy in coming to the field as God's free folk. Answering to nobody but Himself, and with nobody's suppo "I see clearly now that anything, whatever it is, if it be not on the principle of grace, it is not of God. Here shall be my plea in weakness; here shall be my boldness in prayer; here shall be my deliverance in temptation; at last, here shall be my translation. Not of grace? Then not of God." "I think there is nothing so startling in all the graces of God as His quietness." "We have found great joy in coming to the field as God's free folk. Answering to nobody but Himself, and with nobody's support or promise but His very own...it is most gratifying to look aloft to the God who keeps promises and is sufficient." "He is giving me such good things I wonder that I could want more."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    This was just so good. What a life. What an impact he had - in South America himself and around the world because of the opportunities Elisabeth had because she was his widow. Hard to believe this man was only in his 20's - died at age 29. To hear the book read by Elisabeth was just icing on the cake. This was just so good. What a life. What an impact he had - in South America himself and around the world because of the opportunities Elisabeth had because she was his widow. Hard to believe this man was only in his 20's - died at age 29. To hear the book read by Elisabeth was just icing on the cake.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Eugene O'Fallon

    “One does not surrender a life in an instant. That which is lifelong can only be surrendered in a lifetime. Nor is surrender to the will of God (per se) adequate to fullness of power in Christ. Maturity is the accomplishment of years, and I can only surrender to the will of God as I know what that will is.” "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose." “One does not surrender a life in an instant. That which is lifelong can only be surrendered in a lifetime. Nor is surrender to the will of God (per se) adequate to fullness of power in Christ. Maturity is the accomplishment of years, and I can only surrender to the will of God as I know what that will is.” "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy

    The author Elisabeth Elliot was the wife of the famous missionary and martyr Jim Elliot. The author’s classic book on her husband, Through Gates of Splendor, was written in the 1950s but what makes this book different than the first one is that this is written many decades later. This book examines more of Jim Elliot’s own writing from his letters and personal diary. The letters examined include those written to Jim’s parents, siblings and Elisabeth before they got married. This book gives an ho The author Elisabeth Elliot was the wife of the famous missionary and martyr Jim Elliot. The author’s classic book on her husband, Through Gates of Splendor, was written in the 1950s but what makes this book different than the first one is that this is written many decades later. This book examines more of Jim Elliot’s own writing from his letters and personal diary. The letters examined include those written to Jim’s parents, siblings and Elisabeth before they got married. This book gives an honest portrait of a Christian who desires to serve God and also struggles as well. I was much encouraged reading this book although at times I felt it was somewhat prolonged in the author’s choice of what details to share to the readers. But don’t let that distract you as the reader: this book challenged me to think about the sacrifices involved with missions and also convicting to think about how young Jim Elliot and his fellow missionaries were when they went out to try to reach the unreached Huaorani tribe which of course they were eventually killed by when they were contacting them. Of course, the rest is history—as a result of their deaths, God used it to call more Christians to the missions field with their example and martyrdom. I plan one day to read Through Gates of Splendor also.

  13. 4 out of 5

    D.A. Cairns

    I first read this book more than twenty years ago when I was a much younger man, and quite a new Christian. I was impressed and inspired by Jim Elliot who I saw as a kindred spirit: a man of intensity and dedication, someone who was much harder on himself than anyone else was. He learned to enjoy grace over time, but never wavered in his fervour to serve God. This time, I saw the same man, but one who was so dedicated to what he believed God wanted for his life, that he lost it: killed by the ver I first read this book more than twenty years ago when I was a much younger man, and quite a new Christian. I was impressed and inspired by Jim Elliot who I saw as a kindred spirit: a man of intensity and dedication, someone who was much harder on himself than anyone else was. He learned to enjoy grace over time, but never wavered in his fervour to serve God. This time, I saw the same man, but one who was so dedicated to what he believed God wanted for his life, that he lost it: killed by the very people he was trying to reach with the gospel. He died young, and I am still here. Still looking for my thing, still learning about God and myself and doing the best I can with what He has given me. Particularly interesting to me this time round was his relationship with Elisabeth, the author of this impressive biography and the woman he eventually married. Theirs was a long, patient and chaste courtship which makes the relationships of today -most of them-look a little tawdry. Anyway, if you're a Christian you'll enjoy In the Shadow of the Almighty. If you're not, but you like good biographies, you'll also enjoy it. If you are neither, you probably aren't reading this review because you are not at all interested.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Zilkie

    I love this book. It is one of my all-time favorites as it describes the short life of a man whose motto was the very Kingdom centered "He is no fool who gives up what he can not keep to gain that which he can not lose." The passion and resolve of Jim Elliot to follow the leading of God, which for him was to the unreached tribes of South America, ultimately led to his death and the death of his four teammates as they tried to share the gospel with a dangerous yet unreached tribe. Dying before his I love this book. It is one of my all-time favorites as it describes the short life of a man whose motto was the very Kingdom centered "He is no fool who gives up what he can not keep to gain that which he can not lose." The passion and resolve of Jim Elliot to follow the leading of God, which for him was to the unreached tribes of South America, ultimately led to his death and the death of his four teammates as they tried to share the gospel with a dangerous yet unreached tribe. Dying before his 30th birthday, his young life and the lives of the other missionaries sparked a great movement in churches in the 1950s to go to the ends of the earth with the gospel of Jesus Christ. This biography gives more specific detail about the inner thoughts, feelings, and decisions that Jim Elliot nurtured and inspire all who read it to want more from this life than what this world can bring. Thanks to his wife Elizabeth for writing his biography and thank you God for giving us a young and zealous life, in the spirit of Stephen in Acts 7, to see that a life sold out to Jesus is still possible and needed in the world today.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bambi Moore

    This account of Jim Elliot's life, told through his journals and letters to family, friends and Elisabeth, is a story of a man wholly committed to God. His words are beautiful, poetic at times, and his discipline and passionate pursuit of the knowledge of God was so inspiring. One great quote: "Father, make me a crisis man. Bring those I contact to decision. Let me not be a milepost on a single road; make me a fork, that men must turn one way or another on facing Christ in me." Also inspiring was This account of Jim Elliot's life, told through his journals and letters to family, friends and Elisabeth, is a story of a man wholly committed to God. His words are beautiful, poetic at times, and his discipline and passionate pursuit of the knowledge of God was so inspiring. One great quote: "Father, make me a crisis man. Bring those I contact to decision. Let me not be a milepost on a single road; make me a fork, that men must turn one way or another on facing Christ in me." Also inspiring was the commitment to God that Jim and Elisabeth had in their relationship. Not in word only, but the two did not take steps in their relationship until they had the Lord's leading in it. For five years they corresponded by letter, encouraging one another in the work of missionary preparation and later, missionary work. Were it not for their wait, there would be no letters. Praise God they waited because the letters reveal Jim Elliot's bedrock of faith like nothing I've ever heard. Great blessing to read!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    For one week in the winter of 2004, I was moved into a different apartment while mine was renovated. A few weeks earlier, our Bible study leader (who is now in seminary) was so inspired by this book that he bought each of us a copy. No TV, no distractions, cold depressing January, and Mrs Elliot held my complete attention with this awe inspiring tale. Fast forward 3 years, and a friend/former Bible study guy is moving across the country to train to become a missionary pilot, citing this book as For one week in the winter of 2004, I was moved into a different apartment while mine was renovated. A few weeks earlier, our Bible study leader (who is now in seminary) was so inspired by this book that he bought each of us a copy. No TV, no distractions, cold depressing January, and Mrs Elliot held my complete attention with this awe inspiring tale. Fast forward 3 years, and a friend/former Bible study guy is moving across the country to train to become a missionary pilot, citing this book as a turning point in his life. Jim Elliot is a powerful witness and an incredible Christian. It's almost frightening to see what is possible when one dedicates his life completely to Christ. Frightening for reasons other than head hunting natives.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tori

    An amazing book. Jim Elliot was very much a modern-day Paul. His love for God and passion for sharing the gospel are admirable. I found myself wondering at first what more he could have done had he lived a longer life but then realized that through his wife's sharing of Jim's story, countless people have been touched. Again, proof that God's plan is greater than any we can come up with. I plan to read more of Elisabeth's writing as I have been inspired by these two. I feel like I'm a little late An amazing book. Jim Elliot was very much a modern-day Paul. His love for God and passion for sharing the gospel are admirable. I found myself wondering at first what more he could have done had he lived a longer life but then realized that through his wife's sharing of Jim's story, countless people have been touched. Again, proof that God's plan is greater than any we can come up with. I plan to read more of Elisabeth's writing as I have been inspired by these two. I feel like I'm a little late to the party in just discovering the Elliots, so my great thanks to my reading buddy and dear friend, Mary Rose, for bringing these to my attention!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Jim Elliott was an amazing man of God, and any book about his life is inevitably challenging in a spiritual sense. I found, however, that this particular book was otherwise a little dry. It was more the story of his inner spiritual growth rather than his actual life, although obviously the two are intertwined. I think also, upon reading this book, that I was mildly disillusioned about Jim Elliott, because he came across as a somewhat arrogant argumentative person that I probably would not be goo Jim Elliott was an amazing man of God, and any book about his life is inevitably challenging in a spiritual sense. I found, however, that this particular book was otherwise a little dry. It was more the story of his inner spiritual growth rather than his actual life, although obviously the two are intertwined. I think also, upon reading this book, that I was mildly disillusioned about Jim Elliott, because he came across as a somewhat arrogant argumentative person that I probably would not be good friends with were I to meet him.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joseph McBee

    I liked this book but found it difficult to read at times. It is pieced together from Jim Elliot's journals and correspondence and the chapters are well-structured but Elliot was--for lack of a better term--a little melodramatic. For that reason, there were large portions of the book I found myself just slogging through. However, there were also portions that were both inspiring and delightful. I do admire, like most people who know his story, Elliot's passion and sold-out heart for Christ. This I liked this book but found it difficult to read at times. It is pieced together from Jim Elliot's journals and correspondence and the chapters are well-structured but Elliot was--for lack of a better term--a little melodramatic. For that reason, there were large portions of the book I found myself just slogging through. However, there were also portions that were both inspiring and delightful. I do admire, like most people who know his story, Elliot's passion and sold-out heart for Christ. This book is worth reading.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Another missionary biography that makes you feel spiritually very small. Jim Elliott famously said 'He is no fool to give what he cannot keep, to gain what he cannot lose". After making great progress with several Indians in terms of converts and schooling, Elliott (along with 4 other men) was martyred by a more violent tribe of Indians he attempted to introduce to Christianity, but his legacy lives on today in many ways+. Recommend. Another missionary biography that makes you feel spiritually very small. Jim Elliott famously said 'He is no fool to give what he cannot keep, to gain what he cannot lose". After making great progress with several Indians in terms of converts and schooling, Elliott (along with 4 other men) was martyred by a more violent tribe of Indians he attempted to introduce to Christianity, but his legacy lives on today in many ways+. Recommend.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Luke Deacon

    "The principle of getting by spending is illustrated by the actions of God: 'He had yet one, a Beloved Son.' 'He giveth not the Spirit by measure.' 'He spared no His own son.' 'He emptied Himself.' Is heaven the poorer for this spending? Nay, both heaven and earth are enriched by it: Who dare not follow God's example?" (P.250) "The principle of getting by spending is illustrated by the actions of God: 'He had yet one, a Beloved Son.' 'He giveth not the Spirit by measure.' 'He spared no His own son.' 'He emptied Himself.' Is heaven the poorer for this spending? Nay, both heaven and earth are enriched by it: Who dare not follow God's example?" (P.250)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chase Chandler

    This book is incredibly impactful. Beginning it, I believed that it was the story of a man’s death. I did not realize this was not the case until after I finished the book. This book is the story of a man’s incredible faith and obedience throughout his entire life. We are given a front row seat to how Jim Elliot lived every single aspect of his life for God. Amazing book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Nail

    After listening to Elisabeth Elliot in Urbana, IL at a Inter-Varsity mission conference I read the book. I have a deep respect for Jim and Elisabeth. I love the quote on the front of the book and have used it many times.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ben Chapman

    The life and testament of Jim Elliot has served to increase my faith like nothing I've ever read, outside the Bible. Jim believed in a deep, serious obedience to Christ. And he was very unashamed of it. That's how he lived and that's how he died. The life and testament of Jim Elliot has served to increase my faith like nothing I've ever read, outside the Bible. Jim believed in a deep, serious obedience to Christ. And he was very unashamed of it. That's how he lived and that's how he died.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sonny

    “He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.” Jim Elliot “When Christ calls a man, he bids him come and die.” ― Deitrich Bonhoeffer, The Cost of Discipleship Jim Elliot was an Evangelical Christian who served as a missionary to the Quichua, an indigenous people group in the jungles of Ecuador. Shadow of the Almighty is the life and testament of Elliot, as told by his widow Elisabeth. The book covers Jim’s life up to the time of his martyrdom in 1956 at the age of 28. Ell “He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.” Jim Elliot “When Christ calls a man, he bids him come and die.” ― Deitrich Bonhoeffer, The Cost of Discipleship Jim Elliot was an Evangelical Christian who served as a missionary to the Quichua, an indigenous people group in the jungles of Ecuador. Shadow of the Almighty is the life and testament of Elliot, as told by his widow Elisabeth. The book covers Jim’s life up to the time of his martyrdom in 1956 at the age of 28. Elliot was one of five men killed while trying to evangelize the Huaorani people of Ecuador, an isolated tribe known for their violence against both their own people and outsiders who entered their territory. The Huaorani were known pejoratively as the Aucas (a modification of awqa, the Quichua word for “savages”). Jim and his four colleagues sought out the Huaorani, in obedience to the Great Commission, with the intention of being the first Christians to evangelize the previously uncontacted Huaorani. 18 And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.” Matthew 28:18-20 The martyrdom of Elliot and the other four men led to a renewed interest in world missions. Life magazine covered the deaths of the men with a photo essay. The ensuing worldwide publicity gave several missionary organizations significantly more visibility, especially in the United States and Latin America. Most notable among these was the Summer Institute of Linguistics (SIL), the organization for which Elisabeth Elliot worked. Numerous people felt the call to be missionaries through reading Elisabeth Elliot’s books. Chronologically, this book ends where her book Through Gates of Splendor begins. The story weaves together Jim’s early life, his dedication to ministry, his college days, and his rather distanced courtship with Elisabeth. Only the last few chapters cover his time on the mission field. Shadow of the Almighty is a challenging book to read. Rather than being a simple, straightforward narrative, the book is largely a collection of Jim Elliot’s journal entries and his personal letters, with brief explanations provided by the author, Elisabeth Elliot. It showcases his love for his Lord and his desire to serve Christ, even into death. Jim does not shy away from describing his struggles and doubts. The content is both inspirational and thought-provoking. "Jim left for me, in memory, and for us all, in these letters and diaries, the testimony of a man who sought nothing but the will of God, who prayed that his life would be 'an exhibit' to the value of knowing God." ― Elisabeth Elloitt, Shadow of the Almighty While I found the book a challenge to read, I often found that the words and thoughts of this young man challenged me. The book demonstrates that obedience is costly, a message reminiscent of the German pastor and theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer, who was killed at the command of Adolf Hitler for his staunch resistance to the Nazi dictatorship. “Costly grace is the gospel which must be sought again and again and again, the gift which must be asked for, the door at which a man must knock. Such grace is costly because it calls us to follow, and it is grace because it calls us to follow Jesus Christ. It is costly because it costs a man his life, and it is grace because it gives a man the only true life. It is costly because it condemns sin, and grace because it justifies the sinner. Above all, it is costly because it cost God the life of his Son: 'Ye were bought at a price', and what has cost God much cannot be cheap for us. Above all, it is grace because God did not reckon his Son too dear a price to pay for our life, but delivered him up for us. Costly grace is the Incarnation of God.” ― Dietrich Bonhoeffer, The Cost of Discipleship While the book is challenging to read (three stars), it inspires by showing what passion for Christ looks like (five stars).

  26. 4 out of 5

    Reeds

    "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep, to gain that which he cannot lose." Quote from another reviewer so I wouldn't have to find it again: "This book could be read as a prequel to Through Gates of Splendor, also by Elisabeth Elliot. It is basically a biography of the life of Jim Elliot, from the perspective of his wife, his lengthy and detailed journals and his letters to his family/friends. On reading about Jim's school life and growing experiences, I was impressed with his dedication to "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep, to gain that which he cannot lose." Quote from another reviewer so I wouldn't have to find it again: "This book could be read as a prequel to Through Gates of Splendor, also by Elisabeth Elliot. It is basically a biography of the life of Jim Elliot, from the perspective of his wife, his lengthy and detailed journals and his letters to his family/friends. On reading about Jim's school life and growing experiences, I was impressed with his dedication to personal holiness and spiritual discipline. Also, his desire to understand the Bible for himself through thorough study rather than relying on, and adopting the viewpoints of, other respected Christians. Most of us tend to do the latter, often to our detriment, especially when it comes to apologetics as we are unable to effectively express our viewpoints/defend our faith as we haven't studied it in sufficient detail, or been persuaded ourselves what we believe. Elliot diligently and persistently studied the Word often adopting viewpoints that went completely against the grain at the time. He sought also to use every minute of his time wisely and only got himself involved in those things that would forward God's Kingdom in some aspect or another. Through reading his diaries it is clear that his dogmatic views changed over time but his heart was always to follow Scripture regardless the cost to his personal reputation." “While Elliot's life was interesting and his devotional life a challenge I found the style of the book hard going and much too detailed in places. Lengthy journal extracts and letters about flora and fauna, Elliot's personal spiritual experiences, The format of telling most of Jim Elliot's story from his own words in journals and letters is effective, I suppose, but ends up rather dry. Oddly, I found Mr. Elliot's writing poetic and compelling at times. I wonder if Mrs. Elliot could have simply relied on his own words too much? Perhaps she could have summarized more events.” “Mr. Elliot made it clear that he would register as a conscientious objector should he be drafted. I confess that I do NOT understand at all this religious objection to defending freedom. It's interesting to note that I read a biography of George and Martha Washington at the same time I read this biography, and I would consider George Washington to have had as deep and abiding a faith as Mr. Elliot had. Mr. Washington, however, considered it an obligation to serve his country by defending the budding United States from tyranny--and indeed, several prominent Quakers left their sect and their pacifism to fight against the British in the Revolutionary War. So while I suppose I can respect Mr. Elliot's strength of conviction, I do not understand it, and I suspect that he would have been mightily offended by Mr. Washington's ability to reconcile his faith with serving in war.”

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eric Fults

    Great testimony of Jim Elliot's life. He was sold out for the Lord and desired to serve him with all that he had. Somewhat dry to read since it is primarily a compilation of Jim's journal entries, which is beautiful, but also can be overly detailed and cumbersome to read at times. The book is pretty slow-going because of that. Also, you need to be very discerning as you read this. Especially in Jim's early days he was extremely set in his ways and his opinions and convictions come across as facts Great testimony of Jim Elliot's life. He was sold out for the Lord and desired to serve him with all that he had. Somewhat dry to read since it is primarily a compilation of Jim's journal entries, which is beautiful, but also can be overly detailed and cumbersome to read at times. The book is pretty slow-going because of that. Also, you need to be very discerning as you read this. Especially in Jim's early days he was extremely set in his ways and his opinions and convictions come across as facts with which there is no room for disagreement. Also, some of his decisions lacked discernment and maturity. His prolonging of marriage was not a bad thing (I think there are definitely those who are called to singleness for the Kingdom), but Jim was essentially emotionally and relationally married to Elisabeth for years before they made the commitment, which I think was wrong. If he wanted to delay marriage, he shouldn't have kept up the emotional relationship with his eventual wife that he did. I think this decision and several others lacked judgment, so I think great discernment is needed when reading this. Nonetheless, Elisabeth does show how some of his views matured over time. All in all, great testimony. The ending was really short and non-descriptive regarding his final days up until death. Elisabeth Elliot's book Through Gates of Splendor is more of an account of these final days, so I'd recommend that book instead if that's what you want to know about.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    For content; an excellent book. Powerful testament of the life & death of Jim Elliot, a US missionary to the Haorani & Quechua indians of Ecuador. Finished the book convicted and encouraged for boldness of faith like Jim’s. In terms of form/style, the book is a compilation of Jim Elliot’s prayer book, journal, and letters to family. At times it doesn’t flow perfectly, and could be confusing trying to keep track of who a passage was written to, but don’t let this stop you from reading it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bradford Lartigue

    A MUST READ!!! I LOVE any books written by Elisabeth Elliott. I personally met her in White Sulphur Springs, Montana and at home in Big Sky. She had an onset of dementia the 2nd time we met, unfortunately. I have read the hard copy of this book, but now have it as an audible book as well. Need to read it again!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alysia

    Amazing story of the life of Jim Elliot, told by his wife through his journals, letters and her life with him. Jim Elliot was a man who had his eyes fixed on Jesus at all times. Very inspiring and I can’t wait to read “Through gates of splendour” next.

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