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Ramona and Her Mother

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This is a previously published edition of edition of ISBN 9780380709526. An alternative cover edition for this ISBN can be found here. Ramona Quimby is no longer seven, but not quite eight. She's "seven and a half right now," if you ask her! Not allowed to stay home alone, yet old enough to watch pesky Willa Jean, Ramona wonders when her mother will treat her like her older This is a previously published edition of edition of ISBN 9780380709526. An alternative cover edition for this ISBN can be found here. Ramona Quimby is no longer seven, but not quite eight. She's "seven and a half right now," if you ask her! Not allowed to stay home alone, yet old enough to watch pesky Willa Jean, Ramona wonders when her mother will treat her like her older, more mature sister, Beezus. But with her parents' unsettling quarrels and some spelling trouble at school, Ramona wonders if growing up is all it's cracked up to be. No matter what, she'll always be her mother's little girl…right? This warm-hearted story of a mother's love for her spirited young daughter is told beautifully by Newbery Medal winning author Beverly Cleary.


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This is a previously published edition of edition of ISBN 9780380709526. An alternative cover edition for this ISBN can be found here. Ramona Quimby is no longer seven, but not quite eight. She's "seven and a half right now," if you ask her! Not allowed to stay home alone, yet old enough to watch pesky Willa Jean, Ramona wonders when her mother will treat her like her older This is a previously published edition of edition of ISBN 9780380709526. An alternative cover edition for this ISBN can be found here. Ramona Quimby is no longer seven, but not quite eight. She's "seven and a half right now," if you ask her! Not allowed to stay home alone, yet old enough to watch pesky Willa Jean, Ramona wonders when her mother will treat her like her older, more mature sister, Beezus. But with her parents' unsettling quarrels and some spelling trouble at school, Ramona wonders if growing up is all it's cracked up to be. No matter what, she'll always be her mother's little girl…right? This warm-hearted story of a mother's love for her spirited young daughter is told beautifully by Newbery Medal winning author Beverly Cleary.

30 review for Ramona and Her Mother

  1. 5 out of 5

    Malbadeen

    I'm not able to think about Laura Ingels Wilder's "Little House" books objectively because when I hear a title or see one of the covers, I am brought back to my childhood bedroom and I can feel the weight of my mom at the end of my bed while she read aloud those books. A nice enough memory to be sure, but more so in light of the fact that things were frequently less than ideal at home. I have a friend that can rattle of pleasant memory after pleasant memory of her childhood while mine frequently I'm not able to think about Laura Ingels Wilder's "Little House" books objectively because when I hear a title or see one of the covers, I am brought back to my childhood bedroom and I can feel the weight of my mom at the end of my bed while she read aloud those books. A nice enough memory to be sure, but more so in light of the fact that things were frequently less than ideal at home. I have a friend that can rattle of pleasant memory after pleasant memory of her childhood while mine frequently ended with comments like "that was right after our house burned down" or "I think my grandma was in the mental institute then" or "I'm not sure why the neighbor shot our dog" and so on and so on. Of course there were plenty of moments of that weren't laced with trauma: being involved in local theater, hand making our own Christmas paper, eating snow cones while my dad coached baseball, etc, etc, etc but the memory that can bring back the most thorough and pleasant sensations is that of my mom at the end of my bed. Even when it was happening I could fell that it was a unique time and I didn't want to do anything to interfere with it. More than once she sat on my foot unintentionally and I laid as still as possible, ignoring the slight discomfort for fear of undoing any part of what was happening. Now I have my own kids and my own version of a "less than ideal home", and I read to them as well. The other night was chaotic and I was too occupied with other things to give them the attention they deserved and before I knew it bedtime was there and I was grumpy and yelling at them to get their teeth brushed and get to bed. I scolded myself in my mind AGAIN for not being the kind of parent I wanted to be that day and then... I sat in the hall between their rooms and read them the last chapter of Ramona and Her Mother and we laughed so hard at parts that I had to stop reading for us to collect ourselves and when Ramona referred to her mom as , "Better than any mother in the world" my daughter yelled "no!" and my son explained, when I looked up (assuming something had happened outside the book), "you're the best mom". And they're wrong. I am NOT the best mom in the world and I know that as they get older the juvenile idolization of parents will give way to a more cynical and frankly accurate perception of who I really am. They'll be able to reflect on all my parental short comings and likely find insecurities or imperfections in their personalities that they can blame on me BUT hopefully with that they will remember those moments when we forgot about cleaning rooms and brushing teeth and doing homework and bickering and we laughed really hard and talked about what we were reading and we just felt happy to be connected to each other.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    Beezus looked over her shoulder. “Is that toothpaste?” she asked in disbelief. Ramona scowled because she did not know what else to do. “Mother!” ..... “Get a spoon and a jar from the kitchen,” directed Mrs Quimby, “and scoop up the toothpaste.” Then she said to Beezus, “She can use it herself, and the rest of us can use a fresh tube.” Somehow Ramona felt sad knowing she was about to be excluded from the family tube of toothpaste for a long time. And she wished her mother would not speak to Beezus as Beezus looked over her shoulder. “Is that toothpaste?” she asked in disbelief. Ramona scowled because she did not know what else to do. “Mother!” ..... “Get a spoon and a jar from the kitchen,” directed Mrs Quimby, “and scoop up the toothpaste.” Then she said to Beezus, “She can use it herself, and the rest of us can use a fresh tube.” Somehow Ramona felt sad knowing she was about to be excluded from the family tube of toothpaste for a long time. And she wished her mother would not speak to Beezus as if she were not in the room. “Ramona,” said her mother, “don’t you ever let me catch you squeezing out a whole tube of toothpaste again.” “I won’t,” promised Ramona, and as she went off to the kitchen for a jar and a spoon she felt unexpectedly cheerful. She had done something she had always wanted to do. Of course she would never squeeze out a whole tube of toothpaste again. She had done it once. She did not need to do it again. This is the fifth book in the Ramona series, and is a bookend to the previous book, Ramona and Her Father. Although it was published two years later, it picks up a few weeks after the last book left off. When last we saw the Quimby’s, the girls had just been in the Christmas pageant and her father was due to begin a new job at the grocery after being out of work for months. Ramona is still in 2nd grade, Beezus is in 7th. (And Cleary finally makes open references about the story being set in Portland, Oregon.) It’s now New Year’s and the Quimby’s are throwing a neighborhood brunch. While Beezus helps her mother serve food and hangs out with the adults, Ramona is relegated to the indignity of babysitting her friend Howie’s (bratty) sister, Willa Jean, in the kitchen. Two outcomes of this brunch will affect Ramona for the rest of the book: someone compares Willa Jean to a younger Ramona (how very dare they) and Ramona's mother tells a guest she’d never get by without Beezus. Wait!! What about Ramona? Doesn’t her mother need her? Ramona is a bright and creative girl, but as we’ve seen before, that also makes her an anxious one. And so as the family weathers trials and comical misadventures of various types—Beezus’ disastrous trip to a student hairdresser, Ramona and Howie having their checkers games constantly interrupted by Willa Jean (not for nothing, exactly like Ramona once did to Beezus and Henry), Ramona’s father hating his new job—Ramona is concerned that maybe her mom doesn’t love her as much as she does her perfect older sister. This is where Cleary is brilliant at getting into the heads of her young protagonists. When Ramona tries and fails to make a pair of pants for her stuffed elephant and throws a tantrum, it’s not really about the pants. It’s about wanting to bond with her mother through sewing and failing on that task, while Beezus and Mrs. Quimby have a friendly, harmonious time (again!) hemming one of her skirts. Sometimes you get so frustrated when you can’t express yourself, you just have to give in to that urge to squeeze a plump, fresh tube of toothpaste. And NOT from the bottom. Everything is resolved of course, although there are always loose ends because Cleary’s world is a sweet but realistic one. Mr. Quimby will be quitting his job and going back to school and I’m sure there will be more to come on that in the next book. I’ve been off work for a few months for surgery, and for whatever reason concentrating on books is difficult (and I’m soooooo tired of television.) I’ve enjoyed revisiting this series with adult eyes and observing how well and thoughtfully Cleary pulls these stories off.

  3. 4 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    Once again, Beverly Clearly does it with the character of Ramona, making it easy for readers to connect with this 7-year old girl. She manages to capture the struggles of that age. Though it was longer ago than I care to think about, I remember being 7, and the struggles I had when I was expected to act more mature, but still had to follow the same rules as I did before and chafed at being treated like a "baby" while dealing with pesky younger siblings and/or cousins. The struggle is real, you g Once again, Beverly Clearly does it with the character of Ramona, making it easy for readers to connect with this 7-year old girl. She manages to capture the struggles of that age. Though it was longer ago than I care to think about, I remember being 7, and the struggles I had when I was expected to act more mature, but still had to follow the same rules as I did before and chafed at being treated like a "baby" while dealing with pesky younger siblings and/or cousins. The struggle is real, you guys :P And Beverly Cleary is one of these rare authors that really manages to capture it profoundly.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Julia Winknler

    At 7 and a half, with working parents and a sister at "a difficult age," Ramona Quimby tries hard to do her part to keep family peace. Usually, however, she ends up behind every uproarious incident in the house. Whether she's dying herself blue, watching while her young neighbor flings Kleenex around the house, or wearing her soft new pajamas to school one day (under her clothes, of course), Ramona's life is never dull. Through it all, she is struggling for a place in her mother's heart, worried At 7 and a half, with working parents and a sister at "a difficult age," Ramona Quimby tries hard to do her part to keep family peace. Usually, however, she ends up behind every uproarious incident in the house. Whether she's dying herself blue, watching while her young neighbor flings Kleenex around the house, or wearing her soft new pajamas to school one day (under her clothes, of course), Ramona's life is never dull. Through it all, she is struggling for a place in her mother's heart, worried that she might be unlovable. Not a chance. Ramona Quimby is nothing if not lovable. Beverly Cleary's gift for understanding the tangle of thoughts and emotions in a child's mind and heart is remarkable. Luckily, in addition to being empathic, witty, and astute, Cleary is also prolific. She has created over two dozen children's books, and been presented with many awards, including the Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw, as well as the Newbery Honor for Ramona and Her Father

  5. 4 out of 5

    Renata

    An all-time legend, I stan <3 http://www.frowl.org/worstbestsellers... An all-time legend, I stan <3 http://www.frowl.org/worstbestsellers...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The fifth book in the Ramona series focuses on Ramona and her mother. At the start the family has invited some of their neighbors over to celebrate Mr. Quimby finding a job at the supermarket. Ramona, of course is expected to entertain Willa Jean. I loved the chapter about the parent's argument, and fears that the sister have as they try to sleep that night. The great hair argument was very funny, and will appeal to people of all age's. My favorite is Ramona wearing her pajamas to school. I love The fifth book in the Ramona series focuses on Ramona and her mother. At the start the family has invited some of their neighbors over to celebrate Mr. Quimby finding a job at the supermarket. Ramona, of course is expected to entertain Willa Jean. I loved the chapter about the parent's argument, and fears that the sister have as they try to sleep that night. The great hair argument was very funny, and will appeal to people of all age's. My favorite is Ramona wearing her pajamas to school. I loved how the parent's deal with Ramona announcement that she is running away. Wonderful part of the Ramona Quimby story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I love how complex we see the family relationships and situations are. That a haircut out of the house is such a luxury. But the kicker for me was mom coming in and helping Ramona pack to run away. Actual LOL.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I didn’t remember how much the “father loses his job” plotline continues through the books. There’s also this, which is practically perfect in every way: Ramona was stern. “Grownups are supposed to be perfect.” Both her parents laughed. “Well, they are,” Ramona insisted, annoyed by their laughter. “Name one perfect grownup,” challenged Mr. Quimby. “You can’t do it.” “Haven’t you noticed grownups aren’t perfect?” asked Mrs. Quimby. “Especially when they’re tired.” “Then how come you expect us kids to I didn’t remember how much the “father loses his job” plotline continues through the books. There’s also this, which is practically perfect in every way: Ramona was stern. “Grownups are supposed to be perfect.” Both her parents laughed. “Well, they are,” Ramona insisted, annoyed by their laughter. “Name one perfect grownup,” challenged Mr. Quimby. “You can’t do it.” “Haven’t you noticed grownups aren’t perfect?” asked Mrs. Quimby. “Especially when they’re tired.” “Then how come you expect us kids to be perfect all the time?” demanded Ramona. “Good question,” said Mr. Quimby. “I’ll have to think of an answer.”These are so good.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    I remember how wonderful it felt wearing a new pair of flannel pyjamas. Unlike Ramona, though, I didn’t want to wear them under my day clothes, but I thought her logic was sound., even if in practice it didn’t work as well as she anticipated. This was another fun entry, with Beezus becoming more prickly, no doubt due to puberty, while Ramona begins to question her place in her mother’s heart. And how Ramona figures out that she is loved is sweet.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Hayes

    As a farming, homeschooling, radical homemaking Mama, I will happily go on record stating my distate for the likes of Junie B. Jones and Judy Moody. The modern sisters to Ramona Quimby, Junie and Judy, in my opinion, are simply brats living in a world that I'd prefer not to share with my daughters (although, I must admit, they rather enjoy them). But enter Ramona Quimby, and we are all on the same page. We all relate much more more with Ramona's mishaps and adventures, because they are based on As a farming, homeschooling, radical homemaking Mama, I will happily go on record stating my distate for the likes of Junie B. Jones and Judy Moody. The modern sisters to Ramona Quimby, Junie and Judy, in my opinion, are simply brats living in a world that I'd prefer not to share with my daughters (although, I must admit, they rather enjoy them). But enter Ramona Quimby, and we are all on the same page. We all relate much more more with Ramona's mishaps and adventures, because they are based on what most naughty behavior is based on - misunderstandings and good intentions with bad planning. Her character is believable and loveable, and the culture of the family resonates much more with our own experiences-- whether it is a night when Mom secretly feeds the girls tongue, or the fact that the family must get by with only one car, or that they confront the hardships of her dad being out of work or disliking his job, the hum of a sewing machine on a rainy Saturday, the smell of a slow cooker simmering away in the background, the unavoidable spats between moms and dads, or older sisters who come across as bossy, but who are truly well-meaning. Beverly Cleary's characters are believable and loveable, and the humor is timeless, good for full-belly laughter during bedtime reading.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Settare (on hiatus)

    I grew up with Ramona. Many kids of my generation in Iran grew up with Ramona because when we were kids (in the 2000s and 2010s) these books were one of the most popular translated children's series. Ramona and Her Mother was the first one in the series that I encountered. My mom read it to me when I was little, and it was only her exclusive right to read Ramona to me. (I didn't let my dad read Ramona, his reading tasks were Tintin and Pippi Longstocking) So I have very fond memories of this book I grew up with Ramona. Many kids of my generation in Iran grew up with Ramona because when we were kids (in the 2000s and 2010s) these books were one of the most popular translated children's series. Ramona and Her Mother was the first one in the series that I encountered. My mom read it to me when I was little, and it was only her exclusive right to read Ramona to me. (I didn't let my dad read Ramona, his reading tasks were Tintin and Pippi Longstocking) So I have very fond memories of this book even though I haven't re-read it in many years. My old Persian copy had a red cover and it was read so many times it got torn and lost. But this book always reminds me of my mom and is one of my favorite Ramonas to this date. The parts I've sympathized with or tried to imitate: - Squishing a whole tube of toothpaste in the sink just because she was angry - Getting ugly mushroom haircuts and always wanting a nice one - Making costumes for a stuffed animal that is old and ugly but loved, sewing alongside mom - Hugging mom - etc.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    We started reading the series of books starring Ramona Quimby, Beezus, Henry and their friends a few years ago, but we never made too much progress. We intended to read more, but we always chose something else. Our youngest was given the book Ramona the Pest (Ramona Quimby to read by her second grade teacher to practice her reading comprehension and I thought we'd give the series another try. We listened to this book narrated by Stockard Channing on audio CD on a family road trip to Williamsburg. We started reading the series of books starring Ramona Quimby, Beezus, Henry and their friends a few years ago, but we never made too much progress. We intended to read more, but we always chose something else. Our youngest was given the book Ramona the Pest (Ramona Quimby to read by her second grade teacher to practice her reading comprehension and I thought we'd give the series another try. We listened to this book narrated by Stockard Channing on audio CD on a family road trip to Williamsburg. Despite my hubby's initial objections, we all enjoyed listening to the story together, and the setting brought back a sense of nostalgia for my hubby and I. (R-O-L-A-I-D-S spells relief) Although these were written more than thirty years ago, they are still fun and great for children. It's refreshing to see that as time passes, some things still stay the same. I like the Ramona's sincerity and the fact that she experiences real emotions. She gets angry at times, but she is also joyous, fearful and proud. She is jealous of her older sister, but loves her and looks up to her as well. She worries when her parents fight. We really enjoyed listening to this book together.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Genevieve

    The Ramona books were a big part of my childhood reading, but I hadn't revisited Ramona and Her Mother in a couple of decades. Boy does this book hold up! When I played the audiobook for my kids on a road trip, I laughed and cried. And I didn't even particularly like this narrator (Stockard Channing), so full credit goes to Beverly Clearly, who is a genius at understanding the soul of a child. I can't think of a fictional character who is more real and more lovable than Ramona Quimby. Every word The Ramona books were a big part of my childhood reading, but I hadn't revisited Ramona and Her Mother in a couple of decades. Boy does this book hold up! When I played the audiobook for my kids on a road trip, I laughed and cried. And I didn't even particularly like this narrator (Stockard Channing), so full credit goes to Beverly Clearly, who is a genius at understanding the soul of a child. I can't think of a fictional character who is more real and more lovable than Ramona Quimby. Every word rings true. My kids loved the book too.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ginnie

    This is at times a touching, funny, relatable tale of Ramona when she is 7 and a half. Beverly Cleary as an amazing talent for writting about everyday life in an amusing, way, but also writes about life's little hardships that don't seem so little when you are living them. Enjoyed this book immensely! This is at times a touching, funny, relatable tale of Ramona when she is 7 and a half. Beverly Cleary as an amazing talent for writting about everyday life in an amusing, way, but also writes about life's little hardships that don't seem so little when you are living them. Enjoyed this book immensely!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lydia

    I think I really enjoyed this. Even though she is a punk I like it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    BHodges

    Solid. Not my fav in the series, though. Daughter still loving these.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    I'm just so glad that these hold up. So many of my fondly remembered childhood favorites don't. But Ramona is real, and the story here has just as much tough stuff as it does happiness. I am so happy that Ramona exists. I'm just so glad that these hold up. So many of my fondly remembered childhood favorites don't. But Ramona is real, and the story here has just as much tough stuff as it does happiness. I am so happy that Ramona exists.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Abhi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. SPOILER ALERT! “I think it was kind of funny when she wore her pajamas to school.“

  19. 5 out of 5

    Loriann Fish

    This book has one of my favorite Ramona stories in it, the time when Ramona wore her pajamas to school. For some reason, the app will not let me rate this book accurately. 4 stars.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    No one captures the epitome of a precocious little firecracker of a girl better than Beverly Cleary! I read my first ‘Ramona’ book when I was in the 2nd grade (“Ramona Quimby, Age 8” – still my favorite) and my enjoyment of them has not waned in the slightest 21 years later! I absolutely adore these books. They convey such a warm sense of family, even when times are tough (and they have to “scrimp and pinch to make ends meet”). Cleary’s ability to write from the perspective of a “seven and a hal No one captures the epitome of a precocious little firecracker of a girl better than Beverly Cleary! I read my first ‘Ramona’ book when I was in the 2nd grade (“Ramona Quimby, Age 8” – still my favorite) and my enjoyment of them has not waned in the slightest 21 years later! I absolutely adore these books. They convey such a warm sense of family, even when times are tough (and they have to “scrimp and pinch to make ends meet”). Cleary’s ability to write from the perspective of a “seven and a half” year old is so spot-on that you’ll find yourself remembering what it was like to be that age. I have read that not being able to find books containing characters she could relate to frustrated Cleary as a child; she went on to earn a library science degree and spent a lot of time around children who felt the same way she did. In writing her books, Cleary created a world of wonderful characters and stories that children could relate to for decades, and I would just like to say THANK YOU!! Much to my utter amazement, there is a new (to me) Ramona book that came out in 1999 called “Ramona’s World”. I will be adding this one to my To Read list!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    I feel awful giving this book three stars. I think this series is the best ever! But my girls and I are listening to the series on audiotape (read by Stockard Channing), and I just didn't enjoy this one as much as the others. My girls think the toothpaste incident was hilarious, and are still talking about it...I take a deep breathe everytime I walk into the bathroom now. I think what I didn't like about this book so much is that its real - the bad haircut, the struggle to be understood, the per I feel awful giving this book three stars. I think this series is the best ever! But my girls and I are listening to the series on audiotape (read by Stockard Channing), and I just didn't enjoy this one as much as the others. My girls think the toothpaste incident was hilarious, and are still talking about it...I take a deep breathe everytime I walk into the bathroom now. I think what I didn't like about this book so much is that its real - the bad haircut, the struggle to be understood, the perceived unfairness. This series is wonderful - families aren't perfect, and I love the way they work through their problems. But it felt like this book had more problems than it did happy times. But that's life sometimes, right? My girls give this book five stars, and given that they are the audience it was written for, I suppose that is what matters! Therefore, my 4 star rating is the average.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    Once again, Cleary pulled up incidents from my own past. Seven-year-old Ramona admits that she's always wanted to pull Kleenex out of a box, just for the joy of pulling them. Then she wants to squeeze a new tube of toothpaste, sculpting a shape from the long white 'worm' that keeps growing. My sister was intrigued with powder in a powder mitt. Locked in the bathroom, she put a pat of powder in each of the tiles that covered the walls. Ramona would have approved. Here's the opening sentence of the Once again, Cleary pulled up incidents from my own past. Seven-year-old Ramona admits that she's always wanted to pull Kleenex out of a box, just for the joy of pulling them. Then she wants to squeeze a new tube of toothpaste, sculpting a shape from the long white 'worm' that keeps growing. My sister was intrigued with powder in a powder mitt. Locked in the bathroom, she put a pat of powder in each of the tiles that covered the walls. Ramona would have approved. Here's the opening sentence of the book. It says so much; no words are wasted. "When will they be here?" asked Ramona Quimby, who was supposed to be dating the living room but instead was twirling around trying to make herself dizzy.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    Want to do a reread so will review at that time.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    I look forward to reading this one to my girls.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer (JenIsNotaBookSnob)

    I don't really have much to say about this one- I liked it more than Ramona and Her Father. I was in the wrong mood to read it, having just had an argument with spouse. I don't know why, but, I really hate the father in the book. Every time he speaks I displace a whole lotta rage on that character. I don't know why they are bothering to send his whiny arse to college. If working in a grocery store was too stressful, a job I enjoyed for 7 years, I don't know how he's going to handle doing anythin I don't really have much to say about this one- I liked it more than Ramona and Her Father. I was in the wrong mood to read it, having just had an argument with spouse. I don't know why, but, I really hate the father in the book. Every time he speaks I displace a whole lotta rage on that character. I don't know why they are bothering to send his whiny arse to college. If working in a grocery store was too stressful, a job I enjoyed for 7 years, I don't know how he's going to handle doing anything else. Granted, retail work isn't easy, but, the way he complains is just absurd for an adult with children. I mean, he does realize the grocery store customers are also going to be using the services of any other skill he learns right? Anyhow, I didn't mind the dad until "Ramona and her Father" and now I spend the whole book wishing he would just leave. Everyone would be better off without that wet blanket.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Misti

    Everyone always says that Beezus is her mother's girl, that her mother couldn't get along without her. Why doesn't anyone say that about Ramona? What will it take for her to be called "her mother's girl?" Another solidly enjoyable entry in the Ramona series. I find that the episodic nature of these means that I have trouble remembering which anecdote belongs to which book -- if, as in the current case, I'm listening to the whole series without taking a lot of breaks between books, sometimes they Everyone always says that Beezus is her mother's girl, that her mother couldn't get along without her. Why doesn't anyone say that about Ramona? What will it take for her to be called "her mother's girl?" Another solidly enjoyable entry in the Ramona series. I find that the episodic nature of these means that I have trouble remembering which anecdote belongs to which book -- if, as in the current case, I'm listening to the whole series without taking a lot of breaks between books, sometimes they start to blend together.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Ramona's sister Beezus is at "that age" where everything seems challenging. But Ramona finds life hard as well and doesn't think anyone understands. Ramona's parents also seem to be unhappy and even have a fight! What will become of the Quimbys? A fun story of growing up and learning that life isn't always perfect and everyone isn't always happy. But that doesn't mean that they stop being a family. Ramona's sister Beezus is at "that age" where everything seems challenging. But Ramona finds life hard as well and doesn't think anyone understands. Ramona's parents also seem to be unhappy and even have a fight! What will become of the Quimbys? A fun story of growing up and learning that life isn't always perfect and everyone isn't always happy. But that doesn't mean that they stop being a family.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carrie ReadingtoKnow

    Another win from Beverly Cleary! She really wrote amazingly memorable characters. My kids are begging me through this series. They think Ramona "fun!", "funny!", "enjoyable!", etc., etc. Honestly I had no plans to read through the Ramona series this year but the kids would seem to have us well on our way to doing it. These books have made for wonderful read aloud times! Another win from Beverly Cleary! She really wrote amazingly memorable characters. My kids are begging me through this series. They think Ramona "fun!", "funny!", "enjoyable!", etc., etc. Honestly I had no plans to read through the Ramona series this year but the kids would seem to have us well on our way to doing it. These books have made for wonderful read aloud times!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I chose this for a reading challenge prompt, "Reread a favorite book from your childhood." Wow, Beverly Cleary had such an amazing insight into the way children think and perceive their world. I remember clearly being on Team Ramona before, but now I have more appreciation for her tired parents, haha. I chose this for a reading challenge prompt, "Reread a favorite book from your childhood." Wow, Beverly Cleary had such an amazing insight into the way children think and perceive their world. I remember clearly being on Team Ramona before, but now I have more appreciation for her tired parents, haha.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tamara York

    Read aloud to my 7 and 9 year old. So happy to share these childhood favorites with my kids. They are even better read as an adult. This is the Year of Ramona in our house. We are 5 books in, 3 to go.

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