web site hit counter Brief Lives - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Brief Lives

Availability: Ready to download

Compiled as material for Anthony Wood's histories of Oxford University, this text contributes to the oral history of Elizabethan and Stuart England. It parades statesmen, poets, philosopers and scientists, Raleigh and Bacon, Shakespeare and Milton, and Boyle and Halley. They, together with less well known figures, are brought to life in the recorded memories of a vast circ Compiled as material for Anthony Wood's histories of Oxford University, this text contributes to the oral history of Elizabethan and Stuart England. It parades statesmen, poets, philosopers and scientists, Raleigh and Bacon, Shakespeare and Milton, and Boyle and Halley. They, together with less well known figures, are brought to life in the recorded memories of a vast circle of Aubrey's acquaintance and from the personal knowledge of an author who revelled in the variety of human nature and in the intimate, specific and sometimes scandalous aspects of his subjects' lives.


Compare

Compiled as material for Anthony Wood's histories of Oxford University, this text contributes to the oral history of Elizabethan and Stuart England. It parades statesmen, poets, philosopers and scientists, Raleigh and Bacon, Shakespeare and Milton, and Boyle and Halley. They, together with less well known figures, are brought to life in the recorded memories of a vast circ Compiled as material for Anthony Wood's histories of Oxford University, this text contributes to the oral history of Elizabethan and Stuart England. It parades statesmen, poets, philosopers and scientists, Raleigh and Bacon, Shakespeare and Milton, and Boyle and Halley. They, together with less well known figures, are brought to life in the recorded memories of a vast circle of Aubrey's acquaintance and from the personal knowledge of an author who revelled in the variety of human nature and in the intimate, specific and sometimes scandalous aspects of his subjects' lives.

55 review for Brief Lives

  1. 4 out of 5

    Smiley

    Written sometime with anecdotes and probably to amuse himself and friends, this book on some 134 personalities (excluding himself covering 108 pages by the editor) has since been read and admired by those bibliophiles as well as voracious readers since his name’s been off and on mentioned together with those familiar, vaguely known or unknown men/women of eminent stature, for instance, the first 15 names with their professions should suffice in the meantime: George Abbot: Archbishop of Canterbur Written sometime with anecdotes and probably to amuse himself and friends, this book on some 134 personalities (excluding himself covering 108 pages by the editor) has since been read and admired by those bibliophiles as well as voracious readers since his name’s been off and on mentioned together with those familiar, vaguely known or unknown men/women of eminent stature, for instance, the first 15 names with their professions should suffice in the meantime: George Abbot: Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Allen: Mathematician Lancelot Andrewes: Divine Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Albans: Philosopher and statesman Isaac Barrrow: Mathematician Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher: Playwrights Sir John Birkenhead: Poet and journalist Sir Henry Blount: Traveller Edmund Bonner: Divine Caisho Borough: n/a James Bovey: n/a Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork: Statesman The Hon. Robert Boyle: Natural philosopher and chemist Henry Briggs: Mathematician Elizabeth Broughton: n/a After each profession, we would read his/her synopsis written by the editor, then the text itself which might be short or long according to his/her famous or unique deeds as recorded, informed and referenced by the informants or formal publications. However, some might wonder if the biographies in this book are worth reading at all; therefore, I’d like to tell you on two facts, first, they span a two-century timeframe: between the 16th and 17th centuries (back cover) and, two, the material used in this edition has been taken from the real thing, that is, “from fifty volumes in the Bodleian Library at Oxford and from sixteen volumes in the libraries of the Wiltshire Archeological and Natural History Society, The Royal Society, the Corporation of London, and the British Museum” (p. 1). I think there are really some illustrious Aubrey scholars who have written their inspiring reviews on this book or, hopefully, on some biographies from those formidable original volumes kept in the mentioned libraries in England. So it’s my idea to write something on only three excerpts I’ve found originally interesting as follows: First, around half a century ago I sometime heard some people or teachers comment on some friends’ or students’ illegible handwriting in terms of its unreadability and mockingly/humorously said in Thai, ลายมือเหมือนไก่เขี่ย (literally translated: This handwriting is like a hen’s scratches). I thought it’s well said to signify something concrete as a Thai sentence but it was my misunderstanding when I read the Edmund Weller biography and came across this one, “He writes a lamentably poor hand, as bad as the scratching of a hen” (p. 361). So that’s it! The Thai phrase might, arguably, have mysteriously been translated from this English one by our anonymous Thai scholars who probably happened to have read this and subtly translated and adopted it to comment on such poor handwriting. It works and is a kind of informally spoken Thai because we can instantly understand how poor it is. Next, I found this paragraph on Richard Boyle amazingly and incredibly fascinating, something like what you’d expect to read in Ripley’s Believe It or Not!: Master Boyl, after Earle of Cork (who was then a Widdower) came one morning to waite on Sir Jeofry Fenton, at that time a great Officer of State in that Kingdome of Ireland, who being ingaged in business, and not knowing who it was who desired to speake with him, a while delayed him access; which time he spent pleasantly with his young Daughter in her Nurse's Arms. But when Sir Jeoffry came, ... , he civilly excused it. But Master Boyl replied, he had been very well entertayned; and spent his time much to his satisfaction, in courting his Daughter, if he might obtaine the Honour to be accepted for his Son-in-lawe. At which Sir Jeoffry, smiling (to hear one who had been formerly married, move for a Wife carried in Arms, and under two years old) asked him if would stay for her? To which he frankly answered him he would, and Sir Jeoffry as generously promised him he should then have his consent. And they both kept their words honourably. And by this virtuous Lady he had thirteen Children, ten of which he lived to see honourably married, and died a grandfather by the youngest of them. (pp. 138-139)"

  2. 4 out of 5

    David

    Loads of touching and fascinating details about the daily lives of contemporary figures, and anecdotes that bring them to life, like looking through small windows of time into their private lives. Any page has something of interest in it. We learn that Raleigh, for example, 'took a pipe of tobacco a little before he went to the scaffold, which some formal persons were scandalised at', and that William Harvey, besides discovering the circulation of the blood, 'kept a pretty young wench to wait on Loads of touching and fascinating details about the daily lives of contemporary figures, and anecdotes that bring them to life, like looking through small windows of time into their private lives. Any page has something of interest in it. We learn that Raleigh, for example, 'took a pipe of tobacco a little before he went to the scaffold, which some formal persons were scandalised at', and that William Harvey, besides discovering the circulation of the blood, 'kept a pretty young wench to wait on him, which I guess he made use of for warmth-sake as King David did'.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rozzer

    There are idiosyncratic books and then there are idiosyncratic books. Aubrey's "Brief Lives" (along with "Le Grand Meaulnes") is the most idiosyncratic book of which I know. There are some who would argue for "The Anatomy of Melancholy." There are those who would nominate others. But I think that John Aubrey was born and died within his own head and never absorbed anyone else's criteria for anything. Not for biography, not for history, not for memoirs or diaries. No. John Aubrey, whether he knew There are idiosyncratic books and then there are idiosyncratic books. Aubrey's "Brief Lives" (along with "Le Grand Meaulnes") is the most idiosyncratic book of which I know. There are some who would argue for "The Anatomy of Melancholy." There are those who would nominate others. But I think that John Aubrey was born and died within his own head and never absorbed anyone else's criteria for anything. Not for biography, not for history, not for memoirs or diaries. No. John Aubrey, whether he knew it or not, made his own rules. And every single one of his miraculous "Brief Lives" bears the traces of his so terribly individual mental processes. To read them is to enter into another world. I have to get a new copy every so often because I always give my copy away. Keep in mind, though, that no one actually has to shell out money for Aubrey anymore. Free Aubrey is widely available on the net. Aubrey's approach to "biography" (which is so different as to truly require the scare quotes) permits him to include the vaguest suspicions, the most (to some) "irrelevant" details, and the strangest attributions of weird personal qualities. There's a relationship here with the works of Joseph Cornell. Most of Aubrey's subjects live in and only in Aubrey's work, having otherwise lost all semblance of human interest since the 17th Century. We have, after that time, built up many sorts of informational filters in order to limit our attention to people of "real" interest, of "real" value (mainly "celebrities"), and excluding the polloi of the ages. But 99.999% of us ARE "polloi" and it's really interesting when, as here in Aubrey, they (we) get some attention. Aubrey's "Brief Lives" are available in their entirety and for free here: (Volume 1) http://archive.org/details/brieflives... and (Volume 2) here: http://archive.org/details/brieflives....

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lee Ann

    This was soooo good. Lots of fun. It makes me want to learn more about Elizabethan England. As we gossip lovers say, it's juicy. I didn't realize how mathematics was all the rage back then. It was everyone's hobby. Like Suduku for smart people. Almost everyone was a clergyman and mathematician. There are some neat stories on Phillip Sidney and Edmond Spenser. There was also a bawdy “tap the bottom” story on Aubrey's own grandfather. JA's character sketches were vivid but I'm not sure how accurat This was soooo good. Lots of fun. It makes me want to learn more about Elizabethan England. As we gossip lovers say, it's juicy. I didn't realize how mathematics was all the rage back then. It was everyone's hobby. Like Suduku for smart people. Almost everyone was a clergyman and mathematician. There are some neat stories on Phillip Sidney and Edmond Spenser. There was also a bawdy “tap the bottom” story on Aubrey's own grandfather. JA's character sketches were vivid but I'm not sure how accurate. JA is very opinionated and standards for historiography were pretty shaky. But that makes it better! I especially liked the entry on Dr. Harvey of circulation of the blood fame. He believed you should not marry a widow as her womb would hold the “character” of her late husband and all your kids would really be his. Kind of like the old story about how if a blooded dog mates with a mongrel all the blooded dog's future pups will be mutts. JA himself is amusingly Protestant. He is pretty honest about showing the rapaciousness of Henry VIII's “reforms.” JA thinks the whole English Reformation was just a big looting. It's quite cynical. It also explains why so many of his sketch subjects were so irreligious. Fat Henry and his greedy reformers made it all seem like crap.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Holly Lindquist

    If John Aubrey were alive today, I imagine it'd be fantasticly entertaining to have a conversation with him down at the local watering hole, be it coffeehouse, pub, or disreputable tavern. He collected juicy bits of gossip the way some folk hoard stamps or comic books, and this book is a treasure-house of anecdotes regarding notable Elizabethan figures. You'll read about the naughty hijinks of Sir Walter Raleigh, the ill-timed fart that sent an earl into self-imposed exile for seven years, the v If John Aubrey were alive today, I imagine it'd be fantasticly entertaining to have a conversation with him down at the local watering hole, be it coffeehouse, pub, or disreputable tavern. He collected juicy bits of gossip the way some folk hoard stamps or comic books, and this book is a treasure-house of anecdotes regarding notable Elizabethan figures. You'll read about the naughty hijinks of Sir Walter Raleigh, the ill-timed fart that sent an earl into self-imposed exile for seven years, the very dumb death of a very smart man, and the unforgettable episode of the coffin liquor. Yes, you read that correctly.. coffin liquor. P. S. Don't miss Oliver Lawson Dick's sparkling biography of Aubrey in the edition published by David R. Godine books!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    John Aubrey was a real hoot.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    Although abridged, I thoroughly enjoyed both Brian Cox's reading and Aubrey's descriptions of the people of his time. I'm glad that I started with the abridged because, despite my reasonable familiarity of the time I did not recognize many names. Perhaps with reading it I will associate them with characters from other books and simply did not recognize their spoken name. Regardless, the tales were humorous, engaging, and obviously interestingly intuitive by Aubrey. I need to know more about him. Although abridged, I thoroughly enjoyed both Brian Cox's reading and Aubrey's descriptions of the people of his time. I'm glad that I started with the abridged because, despite my reasonable familiarity of the time I did not recognize many names. Perhaps with reading it I will associate them with characters from other books and simply did not recognize their spoken name. Regardless, the tales were humorous, engaging, and obviously interestingly intuitive by Aubrey. I need to know more about him.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    I read this under duress for reasons I'd rather not get into. Honestly, it was a slog and a slow read. Though I did appreciate the humor of Aubrey's observations, and his unique take on what makes for a biographical sketch. Overall, I'm glad I read it. I appreciated Lawson Dick's biography of John Aubrey -- that helped me put it all into context. But if you are looking for a quick, easy read, this isn't it! I read this under duress for reasons I'd rather not get into. Honestly, it was a slog and a slow read. Though I did appreciate the humor of Aubrey's observations, and his unique take on what makes for a biographical sketch. Overall, I'm glad I read it. I appreciated Lawson Dick's biography of John Aubrey -- that helped me put it all into context. But if you are looking for a quick, easy read, this isn't it!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chasmom

    Another book that hooked me on history--another volume read in my grandfather's library, lost after his death, and hunted down for my own library. I suspect Terry Pratchett read this when very young, too. Another book that hooked me on history--another volume read in my grandfather's library, lost after his death, and hunted down for my own library. I suspect Terry Pratchett read this when very young, too.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Graychin

    In an 1852 journal entry, Henry David Thoreau describes visiting the library in nearby Cambridge and looking over an aged volume by Samuel Purchas, possibly Hakluytus Posthumus (1625). The experience of reading the book, says Thoreau, was "like looking into an impassable swamp, ten feet deep with sphagnum, where the monarchs of the forest, covered with mosses and stretched along the ground, were making haste to become peat." This is his way of recommending something. For Thoreau, old books like In an 1852 journal entry, Henry David Thoreau describes visiting the library in nearby Cambridge and looking over an aged volume by Samuel Purchas, possibly Hakluytus Posthumus (1625). The experience of reading the book, says Thoreau, was "like looking into an impassable swamp, ten feet deep with sphagnum, where the monarchs of the forest, covered with mosses and stretched along the ground, were making haste to become peat." This is his way of recommending something. For Thoreau, old books like Purchas's "suggested a certain fertility, an Ohio soil, as if they were making a humus for new literatures to spring in." And yet, he complained, they were "rarely opened, are effectually forgotten and not implied by our literature and newspapers." I’m not sure it's true, or means very much, to say that the old books are no longer "implied by our literature and newspapers," but there is something especially rich and peaty in the English literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Shakepeare and Marlowe and Jonson, of course, are just a beginning. There are in addition the poets (too many to mention) and the philosophers, plus Burton and Browne and Traherne, and translators of genius like Philemon Holland, Thomas Urquhart, and John Florio, whose 1603 version of Montaigne T.S. Eliot considered the best work of translation in the English language. The flavor of that golden era resurfaces here and there throughout the eighteenth century and even into the nineteenth. You taste it in Swift, for example; in Walton's The Compleat Angler; in Gilbert White; in Sterne's Tristram Shandy; in Charles Lamb; and even, I suggest, in certain writings of our own Benjamin Franklin, and in Moby Dick. By the twentieth century, however, it appears only in works of self-conscious copy-catism, like Holbrook Jackson's pleasantly Burtonesque The Anatomy of Bibliomania or John Barth's The Sot Weed Factor. For the best of the authentic old flavor, you must take a slice of the old books themselves. This I recently did. Visiting a favorite used bookshop, I was able, in the panicked last moments before my wife finally extracted me from the stacks, to pick out a copy of John Aubrey's Brief Lives. I had first discovered Aubrey (1626-1697), as most people do, through quotations from his work borrowed by other writers. Rose Macaulay, for example, published a wonderful commonplace book titled The Minor Pleasures of Life, which includes more quotes from Aubrey than from any other author. The Penguin edition of Brief Lives, introduced and edited by Oliver Lawson Dick, is a mere selection from Aubrey's original, but it still includes more than 120 of his short biographies. Aubrey's subjects span the Elizabethan era through to the restoration of Charles II. He seems to have been related to half of the people he mentions, and many were still living when he wrote. Reading the book from cover to cover is like watching old England march by in grand procession – poets, mathematicians, peasants, doctors, divines, alchemists, soldiers, scientists, astrologers, aristocrats – while an inveterate gossipmonger whispers in your ear all their public foibles and personal shames. Aubrey's diction and spelling (preserved in my copy) reek gloriously of the seventeenth century. The preposterous, winning names of some of his subjects are enough in themselves to summon the era – names like Hasdras Waller, Ithamara Reginalds, Hierome Sanchy, Venetia Digby, Carlo Fantom, Wenceslas Hollar, Caisho Borough, Leoline Jenkins, and Sylvanus Scory. Aubrey's gift for physical description and telling anecdote are unbeatable, his stories by turns poignant, superstitious, snarky, and uproariously bawdy. Every paragraph is a pleasure and a surprise. Of a Lady Honywood, for example, Aubrey writes: "Said she (holding a Venice-glass in her Hand), I shall as certainly be Damned, as this Glasse will be broken: And at that word, threw it hard on the Ground; and the Glasse remained sound; which gave her great comfort." Of John Hoskyns: "Now when I have sayd his Inventive faculty is so great, you cannot imagine his Memory to be excellent, for they are like two Bucketts, as one goes up, the other goes downe." Of Mary Herbert, Countess of Pembroke: "She was very salacious, and she had a Contrivance that in the Spring of the yeare, when the Stallions were to leape the Mares, they were to be brought before such a part of the house, where she had a vidette (a hole to peepe out at) to looke on them and please herselfe with their Sport; and then she would act the like sport herselfe with her stallions. One of her great Gallants was Crooke-back’t Cecil, Earl of Salisbury." Of James Harrington: "Anno Domini 1660, he was committed prisoner to the Tower; then to Portsey castle. His durance in these Prisons (he being a Gentleman of a high spirit and a hot head) was the procatractique [originating] cause of his deliration or madnesse; which was not outrageous, for he would discourse rationally enough and be very facetious company, but he grew to have a phansy that his Perspiration turned to Flies, and sometimes to Bees." Of Sir William Petty, when he was challenged to a duel: "Sir William is extremely short-sighted, and being the challengee it belonged to him to nominate place and weapon. He nominates for the place, a darke Cellar, and the weapon to be a great Carpenter’s Axe. This turned [his opponent’s] challenge into Ridicule, and so it came to nought." Of Shakespeare Aubrey reports (how reliably I don't know) that as a young man he was briefly apprenticed to a butcher in Stratford and used to make florid speeches whenever he prepared to kill a calf. Francis Bacon Aubrey assures us was a pederast. He tells us also that William Harvey, who discovered the circulation of the blood, liked to meditate in the dark and had caves dug on his property just for this purpose. It goes wonderfully on and on. I don’t suppose that Aubrey’s Brief Lives is quite the sort of thing that Thoreau had in mind with his image of a rich old book like "an impassable swamp, ten feet deep in sphagnum." He may not have approved. But where Purchas's books may or may not have failed make a promising seedbed for future literatures to spring in, there can be little doubt, I think, that Aubrey's did. At least I like to imagine there's a direct line of descent from Brief Lives to the modern literature of celebrity gossip, hearsay, and personal sniping that is so ubiquitous in the tabloids and newspapers and blogosphere of the English-speaking world. No one today, however, can match Aubrey for humor, wit, and limitless antique charm.

  11. 4 out of 5

    pierlapo quimby

    Estratto dall'edizione in due volumi Andrew Clark, Oxford, 1898: John Colet, D.D., deane of St. Paule's, London—vide Sir William Dugdale's Historie of Paule's church. After the conflagration his monument being broken, his coffin, which was lead, was full of a liquour which conserved the body. Mr. Wyld and Ralph Greatorex tasted it and 'twas of a kind of insipid tast, something of an ironish tast. The body felt, to the probe of a stick which they thrust into a chinke, like brawne. The coffin was o Estratto dall'edizione in due volumi Andrew Clark, Oxford, 1898: John Colet, D.D., deane of St. Paule's, London—vide Sir William Dugdale's Historie of Paule's church. After the conflagration his monument being broken, his coffin, which was lead, was full of a liquour which conserved the body. Mr. Wyld and Ralph Greatorex tasted it and 'twas of a kind of insipid tast, something of an ironish tast. The body felt, to the probe of a stick which they thrust into a chinke, like brawne. The coffin was of lead and layd in the wall about 2 foot ½ above the surface of the floore. Il buon J.R. Wilcock deve essercisi divertito parecchio: John Colet, dott. in teologia, Arciprete di Saint Paul’s a Londra. Dopo l’incendio di Londra (siccome il suo monumento era rotto) qualcuno fece un buchino vicino al coperchio della sua bara, che era chiusa come il recipiente per fare un pasticcio e piena di un liquido atto a conservare la salma. Mr Wyld e Ralph Greatorex l’assaggiarono e aveva una specie di gusto insipido, qualcosa come un gusto ferrugginoso. La bara era di piombo e incassata nel muro, circa a due piedi e mezzo sopra la superfìcie del pavimento. Questo era un modo strano, rarissimo, di conservare un corpo: forse era una salamoia, come per la carne, la cui salsedine i molti anni e il piombo avevano addolcito e resa insipida. Il corpo, tastato con un paletto introdotto in una fessura, sembrava maiale lesso. Prosit!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    I admire this book, and the philosophy of Aubrey in writing it, but I admit I had trouble actually reading it. The entries were all very disjointed. I love the idea of brief lives --of potted biographies that get to the heart of a person via a few well-chosen anecdotes -- but this isn't really that. There are good anecdotes, and also dishy asides, but it doesn't really cohere. It reads like it was: a collection of miscellany that was never really finished, much less edited into shape. That is, w I admire this book, and the philosophy of Aubrey in writing it, but I admit I had trouble actually reading it. The entries were all very disjointed. I love the idea of brief lives --of potted biographies that get to the heart of a person via a few well-chosen anecdotes -- but this isn't really that. There are good anecdotes, and also dishy asides, but it doesn't really cohere. It reads like it was: a collection of miscellany that was never really finished, much less edited into shape. That is, what I want is the anecdotes to layer on top of each other to produce a portrait. But this is more like some sort of abstract art, wild brush strokes going this way and that. Some people love that, and would love it in this book, but for me it made it a bit of a slog.

  13. 4 out of 5

    James Violand

    This is a fascinating book of biographies by a friend of many of the most prominent Englishmen in the Seventeenth Century. If Aubrey did not know the individual, he spoke to friends who had been close to the subject. Filled with tasty morsels of information, it is a fairly quick read. The author was a tragic figure who hob-knobbed with the aristocracy and nobility and was an eye-witness to many of the pivotal events of this era. Encumbered by outrageous inherited debts, Aubrey survived by the la This is a fascinating book of biographies by a friend of many of the most prominent Englishmen in the Seventeenth Century. If Aubrey did not know the individual, he spoke to friends who had been close to the subject. Filled with tasty morsels of information, it is a fairly quick read. The author was a tragic figure who hob-knobbed with the aristocracy and nobility and was an eye-witness to many of the pivotal events of this era. Encumbered by outrageous inherited debts, Aubrey survived by the largess of his powerful friends.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    Wonderful book. A disjointed treasure trove of biography, rumour, scandal, gossip, and random meteorological information. If you are interested in the Elizabethan or Restoration periods, it is a must read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sweta

    hhh

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jake Bornheimer

    Interesting short gossipish biographies of people from 1400-1697, well worth a read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Wonderfully gossipy, but to be taken with a pinch of salt.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    I've been wanting to read this for years and somehow never got round to it. It wasn't very coherent, and frankly I was rather bored. I found it an excellent insomnia cure. I've been wanting to read this for years and somehow never got round to it. It wasn't very coherent, and frankly I was rather bored. I found it an excellent insomnia cure.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Simon

    Charming short biographical tale written in 1680 were written from what Aubrey had seen or heard.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marie (UK)

    been trying to read books that have been on my TBR shelf a while (and on my real bookshelves too) but my son is right i need to get back to something that will grab my imagination. This one certainly lives up to its title of brief lives as Aubrey gives potted biographies of 17th century Personalities. There is more information in many of the editors notes than in most of the Author's writing. It has not helped by the fact that in each biography the editors have tried to modernise the english by been trying to read books that have been on my TBR shelf a while (and on my real bookshelves too) but my son is right i need to get back to something that will grab my imagination. This one certainly lives up to its title of brief lives as Aubrey gives potted biographies of 17th century Personalities. There is more information in many of the editors notes than in most of the Author's writing. It has not helped by the fact that in each biography the editors have tried to modernise the english by putting in brackets after it modern translation or by the fact that Aubrey does a planned biography and then adds notes after it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This was brief sketches in the lives of noble people in mostly the late 1500s and early 1600s. I had no idea who most of these people were so I didn't find much of it interesting at all. This is a great historical piece for people studying this period of time but for just about anyone else, not too interesting. The Appendix on antiquities was actually the most interesting part. This was brief sketches in the lives of noble people in mostly the late 1500s and early 1600s. I had no idea who most of these people were so I didn't find much of it interesting at all. This is a great historical piece for people studying this period of time but for just about anyone else, not too interesting. The Appendix on antiquities was actually the most interesting part.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    Anything containing 'he [Francis Bacon] had for his assitance a favourite of his, a St Alban's man, Mr Dobson... a very ingeniose person... but he spending his estate upon woemen, necessity forced his son Will Dobson to be the most excellent Painter that England hath yet bred' gets 5 stars. Gossipy snippets of a wide range of eminents, some even worse behaved than Papa Dobson. Great stuff. Anything containing 'he [Francis Bacon] had for his assitance a favourite of his, a St Alban's man, Mr Dobson... a very ingeniose person... but he spending his estate upon woemen, necessity forced his son Will Dobson to be the most excellent Painter that England hath yet bred' gets 5 stars. Gossipy snippets of a wide range of eminents, some even worse behaved than Papa Dobson. Great stuff.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    This is a curious, but enjoyable read. A mass of potted biographies of significant (mostly English) and some not so significant individuals from the 16th and 17th centuries. Informal and gossipy and seemingly written as an early draft. Includes politicians, philosophers, scientists, playwrights, theologians etc.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eric Smith

    Wonderfully mad.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    Comic to tragic. Wonderful.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kay Robart

    See my review here: https://whatmeread.wordpress.com/2019... See my review here: https://whatmeread.wordpress.com/2019...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ibis3

    Edition irrelevant.2005-06-08

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jo Christian

  29. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Well worth reading

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  31. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

  32. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

  33. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

  34. 5 out of 5

    Bill Yarrow

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

  36. 5 out of 5

    Christine

  37. 4 out of 5

    Wrpainting

  38. 4 out of 5

    Mark Mirabello

  39. 4 out of 5

    Theron

  40. 5 out of 5

    patience

  41. 4 out of 5

    Roger Herriott

  42. 4 out of 5

    Inna

  43. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  44. 5 out of 5

    Marina

  45. 4 out of 5

    Alexandre

  46. 5 out of 5

    Cat4cwa

  47. 4 out of 5

    V

  48. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  49. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

  50. 5 out of 5

    Mariana

  51. 5 out of 5

    Lynn McGuire

  52. 4 out of 5

    Edward Waverley

  53. 4 out of 5

    Maya

  54. 4 out of 5

    Fitzgerald

  55. 4 out of 5

    Rock

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.