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Change the Culture, Change the Game: The Breakthrough Strategy for Energizing Your Organization and Creating Accountability for Results

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A fully revised and updated installment from the bestselling author of The Oz Principle Series. Two-time New York Times bestselling authors Roger Connors and Tom Smith show how leaders can achieve record-breaking results by quickly and effectively shaping their organizational culture to capitalize on their greatest asset-their people. Change the Culture, Change the Game joi A fully revised and updated installment from the bestselling author of The Oz Principle Series. Two-time New York Times bestselling authors Roger Connors and Tom Smith show how leaders can achieve record-breaking results by quickly and effectively shaping their organizational culture to capitalize on their greatest asset-their people. Change the Culture, Change the Game joins their classic book, The Oz Principle, and their recent bestseller, How Did That Happen?, to complete the most comprehensive series ever written on workplace accountability. Based on an earlier book, Journey to the Emerald City, this fully revised installment captures what the authors have learned while working with the hundreds of thousands of people on using organizational culture as a strategic advantage.


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A fully revised and updated installment from the bestselling author of The Oz Principle Series. Two-time New York Times bestselling authors Roger Connors and Tom Smith show how leaders can achieve record-breaking results by quickly and effectively shaping their organizational culture to capitalize on their greatest asset-their people. Change the Culture, Change the Game joi A fully revised and updated installment from the bestselling author of The Oz Principle Series. Two-time New York Times bestselling authors Roger Connors and Tom Smith show how leaders can achieve record-breaking results by quickly and effectively shaping their organizational culture to capitalize on their greatest asset-their people. Change the Culture, Change the Game joins their classic book, The Oz Principle, and their recent bestseller, How Did That Happen?, to complete the most comprehensive series ever written on workplace accountability. Based on an earlier book, Journey to the Emerald City, this fully revised installment captures what the authors have learned while working with the hundreds of thousands of people on using organizational culture as a strategic advantage.

30 review for Change the Culture, Change the Game: The Breakthrough Strategy for Energizing Your Organization and Creating Accountability for Results

  1. 4 out of 5

    Denisita

    I believed in the message and attempted to read this book, but found it much too complex. I couldn't get into the model or pyramid and unfortunately had to bail early on. I'm an avid reader but prefer an easy, understandable read backed my theory and instructions for practice. Might just be too intellectual for my taste. I believed in the message and attempted to read this book, but found it much too complex. I couldn't get into the model or pyramid and unfortunately had to bail early on. I'm an avid reader but prefer an easy, understandable read backed my theory and instructions for practice. Might just be too intellectual for my taste.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elese Roger

    This book was selected by my Leadership Book Club, and it was fantastic. Lots of wonderful validation. More importantly it anchors accountability, good basic leadership acumen and the power of people when it comes to change. Capturing hearts, minds and souls - it provides you the formula for doing that...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andralynn

    Okay, so I didn't technically finish this book, but I can tell you that I didn't need to. It says the exact same thing over and over in every chapter. So if you read the intro and the first couple of chapters, you get all the information you need. Okay, so I didn't technically finish this book, but I can tell you that I didn't need to. It says the exact same thing over and over in every chapter. So if you read the intro and the first couple of chapters, you get all the information you need.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jenifer

    This book is repetitive and ridiculous. I think the authors should have stopped with The Oz Principle. In addition to feeling like I read the same book that I had already read (The Oz Principle), this book made me feel like I was reading a math book. There were maybe three useful things in it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Iman Shabani

    (It's more of a 1.5) Can't really recommend reading it. (It's more of a 1.5) Can't really recommend reading it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert Chapman

    I read this book as a follow-up to The OZ Principle which to this day I consider one of the best books I have ever read relating to business. You could read this book without first having read The OZ Principle, however, I believe you would get far more out of this book having first done so. The book is great for the same reasons The OZ Principle is - it's great information, provided in a simple and digestible format which allows the reader to start taking immediate action. Don't be fooled by the I read this book as a follow-up to The OZ Principle which to this day I consider one of the best books I have ever read relating to business. You could read this book without first having read The OZ Principle, however, I believe you would get far more out of this book having first done so. The book is great for the same reasons The OZ Principle is - it's great information, provided in a simple and digestible format which allows the reader to start taking immediate action. Don't be fooled by the above statement, the information may be simple, but like anything related to accountability, the results come from a deep commitment to the actions needed to create change. The authors focus on defining, building, and creating organization wide adoption of cultural beliefs as the means to change the culture. The vehicle to achieving these results is joint accountability to create experiences which change personal beliefs. Only when beliefs are changed will the proper actions be taken which lead to achieving the key results. Similar to what I said in my review of The OZ Principle, there are lots of books written on this topic, but few will offer the value this one does. I highly recommend this book, that is of course after you read The OZ Principle.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Alright but very repetitive. Great tips and ideas but not sure of the practical use over time.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Interesting premise but the text is clearly predicated on the authors' previous book so reading this feels like coming into a movie half way through. Interesting premise but the text is clearly predicated on the authors' previous book so reading this feels like coming into a movie half way through.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Julie Spencer

    This book has certainly taken me a while to read, it is one that I have dipped in and out of, I read it at my leisure and not so much for pleasure. I've read so many books of late which discuss the importance of accountability. In my youth this was unheard of and it was a given through training and education that accountability was core to the importance of being and attaining a great occupation in the future. Accountability encourages good practice, it generates a sense of enthusiasm and a sense This book has certainly taken me a while to read, it is one that I have dipped in and out of, I read it at my leisure and not so much for pleasure. I've read so many books of late which discuss the importance of accountability. In my youth this was unheard of and it was a given through training and education that accountability was core to the importance of being and attaining a great occupation in the future. Accountability encourages good practice, it generates a sense of enthusiasm and a sense of pride in our actions which intentionally achieve the results. Maybe if I hadn't have read this book I wouldn't have learned through others experiences the importance of what accountability is, and why it is essential, not just in organisational practice, in everyday life. I do recommend this book, but it isn't one that you can read swiftly, put down and walk away, the importance of this Hardcover is to keep it with you as a point of reference and a reminder that accountability generates a focus, aligns people and connects people to work productively both independently and as part of a supportive team. It may have taken some time, overall, I enjoyed learning from the ideas shared within this book by Roger Connors.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Robert Bogue

    Most books on change conveniently dodge the challenge of culture. After all, changing an organizational culture is difficult. It’s easier to deliver a tactical project than it is to change the way that people think. However, Roger Connors and Tom Smith rightfully think that until you change the beliefs embedded into the culture, you’ll never achieve the breakthrough results you really want. In Change the Culture, Change the Game: The Breakthrough Strategy for Energizing Your Organization and Cre Most books on change conveniently dodge the challenge of culture. After all, changing an organizational culture is difficult. It’s easier to deliver a tactical project than it is to change the way that people think. However, Roger Connors and Tom Smith rightfully think that until you change the beliefs embedded into the culture, you’ll never achieve the breakthrough results you really want. In Change the Culture, Change the Game: The Breakthrough Strategy for Energizing Your Organization and Creating Accountability for Results, they lay out a process for getting different results based on the foundation of accountability and beliefs. Read more

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I'd describe this book as a whitepaper made into a book when it should've stayed a whitepaper. The premise could be summed up with a view visuals in an infographic format with some case studies to provide application. Instead, it drones on for over 200 pages using algebraic equation-like style to convey current state and desired state as if that makes it more mysterious or impressive (C1 to C2, R1 to R2, B1 to B2, etc.). It felt like this book was written just to sell consulting services versus I'd describe this book as a whitepaper made into a book when it should've stayed a whitepaper. The premise could be summed up with a view visuals in an infographic format with some case studies to provide application. Instead, it drones on for over 200 pages using algebraic equation-like style to convey current state and desired state as if that makes it more mysterious or impressive (C1 to C2, R1 to R2, B1 to B2, etc.). It felt like this book was written just to sell consulting services versus being written to facilitate self-learning.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mike Budzik

    There are some great examples and really good principles, but there is also A LOT of repetition. This audiobook could have been 5.25 hours instead of 7.5 (or 175 pages instead of 250 for the print edition). The audiobook came with a great PDF that bridged the gap between the audiobook and the print edition. That was great feature and made the audiobook edition a reasonable choice for me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Lewis

    This book is a very focused culture management toolkit. It is part of a larger set of tools developed by a consulting firm. The nice thing here is that the book contains both some of the introspection that leadership teams need to do to make culture change happen but also gives concrete tools on how to engage with the workforce.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Esteban

    Really interesting approach, presentedwith vast details and examples. It'd be nice though to have further examples of difficulties encountered during the process, like bosses resisting the changes or playong against it. Really interesting approach, presentedwith vast details and examples. It'd be nice though to have further examples of difficulties encountered during the process, like bosses resisting the changes or playong against it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nikolas Fox

    This was not as rife with privilege and victim blaming as the Oz Principle, and had some good points about how to change the culture of an organization. It was still quite redundant and could have been condensed to about half the size.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tamara Whitters

    More complex than needed The overall writing was not as clear as it could be. The authors needed more examples, stories and implementation plans.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jay Hennessey

    UGGG!!!! Repetitive, Repetitive, Repetitive — worst of all, I was not a huge fan of the content either.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Brower

    Solid information but very, very dry and also quite basic. Includes a lot of sales talk for the authors’ previous book and consulting.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    Concepts are sound and proven but the presentation drags on and is very repetitive from prior writings.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shane Young

    Good book with good concepts. Due to the nature of the book, I feel that the audience is limited to those that want to change the culture and have the power to.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nacho Bassino

    A very good framework for thinking and implementing culture change. Some specific examples mixed with "theory" and a way to think about culture change. A very good framework for thinking and implementing culture change. Some specific examples mixed with "theory" and a way to think about culture change.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I have witnessed successful implementations of this approach. The book is a helpful overview but could not possibly take the place of an experienced leadership consultant.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tony Vynckier

    This book introduces a methodology for changing the way people think and act throughout an organization to make certain they achieve their key results. The main idea this book puts forward is: Changing the company culture is the only way to improve. Roger Connors and Tom Smith clearly state: Either you manage the culture, or it will manage you! When attempting to modify the corporate ethos and create a sustainable competitive advantage consider four essential ideas: - Change the culture of top mana This book introduces a methodology for changing the way people think and act throughout an organization to make certain they achieve their key results. The main idea this book puts forward is: Changing the company culture is the only way to improve. Roger Connors and Tom Smith clearly state: Either you manage the culture, or it will manage you! When attempting to modify the corporate ethos and create a sustainable competitive advantage consider four essential ideas: - Change the culture of top management first - It is the culture that drives the results and not vice versa - A culture of Accountability is to be used in order to be successful - The Results Pyramid will accelerate the cultural change As a company you need to make sure you move away from the blame game and move towards a common mindset of solution and progress. The steps to take towards a culture of Accountability are: - See It : acknowledge reality and recognize what must be done - Own It : proactively invest effort and commit to getting things done - Solve It : recognize and eliminate barriers together - Do It : produce the top priority results in the right way, as promised The authors have taken the concept of creating a Culture of Accountability to a higher level by demonstrating how to accelerate cultural change in order to keep an organization competitive and focused. An audacious new objective always triggers a cultural shift because it shuffles people around and forces to use new work patterns. On top of this leaders will need to apply tools like: constructive feedback, motivational storytelling and positive recognition. Each reader should select what is most relevant and responsive to the needs of his or her organization. In order to change your company culture use the Results Pyramid. It has four levels that need to be addressed simultaneously: Results, Actions, Beliefs and Experiences. As a leader you have to change the experiences, beliefs and actions of your people. As the right experiences foster beliefs, improved beliefs influence actions and focussed actions produce results. You need to get all of your people involved and motivated, changing a culture is a team effort. The book also mentions tree leadership skills crucial to making the cultural change happen: lead the change, be able to constructively respond to feedback and be facilitative while listening with empathy. Definitely a book to consider as a lot of companies have to adjust their culture to the changing environment to stay in profit. The book is well-written and good examples bring the topic to life. Tony VYNCKIER

  24. 4 out of 5

    Soundview Executive Book Summaries

    Change the Culture, Change the Game: The Breakthrough Strategy for Energizing Your Organization and Creating Accountability for Results by Roger Connors and Tom Smith was chosen by Soundview Executive Book Summaries as one of the Top 30 Business Books of 2011. THE SOUNDVIEW REVIEW: When it comes to accountability, readers would be hard pressed to find two better authors to discuss the subject than Roger Connors and Tom Smith. This book serves as a natural next-step from the pair’s previous best-se Change the Culture, Change the Game: The Breakthrough Strategy for Energizing Your Organization and Creating Accountability for Results by Roger Connors and Tom Smith was chosen by Soundview Executive Book Summaries as one of the Top 30 Business Books of 2011. THE SOUNDVIEW REVIEW: When it comes to accountability, readers would be hard pressed to find two better authors to discuss the subject than Roger Connors and Tom Smith. This book serves as a natural next-step from the pair’s previous best-sellers The Oz Principle, Journey to the Emerald City and How Did That Happen?. Executives who read this book will no doubt spend a considerable amount of time reflecting on the book’s main premise: your current culture will not help you achieve your future results. Take a moment to think about this idea. While it sounds rather intuitive, Connors and Smith point out just how few organizations are able to make the connection between their organizational culture and the results that it produces. Of course, when one considers this idea, the logic of it becomes as clear as the midday sun. The book is one of the most densely packed instructional volumes that executives will encounter. However, the results that it is certain to produce more than justify the investment of time that readers will devote to it. It’s also a book that has definite shelf-life. In today’s business book climate, that’s a rare commodity. Connors and Smith cite management legend Peter Drucker who said, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” With Change the Culture, Change the Game, readers will learn exactly why this is the case. Soundview's 8-page Executive Book Summary of Change the Culture, Change the Game is available here.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ravi Warrier

    When I first started reading this book a few months back, I put it down after probably the first 2 or 3 pages. I believe, I misunderstood what Roger Conners and Tom Smith were trying to say. But that was months back. I picked up the book again two weeks back and went past my mental barrier just to find that I actually agree to most of the things Conners/Smith has to say about helping organizations and teams develop their culture. The authors have shed light on subjects that usually elude our cons When I first started reading this book a few months back, I put it down after probably the first 2 or 3 pages. I believe, I misunderstood what Roger Conners and Tom Smith were trying to say. But that was months back. I picked up the book again two weeks back and went past my mental barrier just to find that I actually agree to most of the things Conners/Smith has to say about helping organizations and teams develop their culture. The authors have shed light on subjects that usually elude our conscious mind. We vaguely understand, if at all we do, the impact of our actions as leaders on, not only the physical output (goods/services) but the intangibles like culture and beliefs. Conners/Smith have codified their entire concept into formulas that leaders can use to change their organization's culture and thus their results. The book might as well have been a book on mathematical theories, as the duo have meticulously explained with comprehensive examples, the meaning and the impact on and of each variable in the equations. For example, speaking on a personal level, I had never chalked out a path between leadership's actions and final results on the shop floor, or the invisible results that permeates like ether in the organization. And reading this book has helped me understand this journey better. The book gives plenty and great examples, but could have been more instructive if the examples were directly linked to the actions of Conners/Smith as consultants and their clients, instead of general steps of dos and don'ts. Nevertheless, it's a book I'll encourage every business leader to read. Even if you disagree to how your actions influence how your people sleep at nights, you can now not say, "I didn't know!"

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bob Wallner

    I read many negative reviews saying Change The Culture kept repeating themselves. I guess we are all to assume that those reviewers had absolutely no problems making huge cultural changes in their workplaces. For the rest of us, the authors do a great job of getting key points through your head. This book provides a step by step instruction to get from today to tomorrow. I listened to the audiobook and my one criticism is the constant use of R1/R2, B1/B2, etc. It was difficult to follow at times; I read many negative reviews saying Change The Culture kept repeating themselves. I guess we are all to assume that those reviewers had absolutely no problems making huge cultural changes in their workplaces. For the rest of us, the authors do a great job of getting key points through your head. This book provides a step by step instruction to get from today to tomorrow. I listened to the audiobook and my one criticism is the constant use of R1/R2, B1/B2, etc. It was difficult to follow at times; however, it made much more sense when I was able to view the visuals. I really enjoyed this book and will put in on my "Re-Read" list.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    A read for work, this is based on the Partners in Leadership Culture Change Track. The book is wildly similar to the training (making it consistent). There were for sure a few extra nuggets in here that made it worth reading, but as far as the text itself, a lot of the meat of it can get a little bit jargin-y and at times repetitive, and (for better or worse) the the text is filled with anecdotes. All in all, I buy in to the theory of culture change and the tools presented by the authors and thin A read for work, this is based on the Partners in Leadership Culture Change Track. The book is wildly similar to the training (making it consistent). There were for sure a few extra nuggets in here that made it worth reading, but as far as the text itself, a lot of the meat of it can get a little bit jargin-y and at times repetitive, and (for better or worse) the the text is filled with anecdotes. All in all, I buy in to the theory of culture change and the tools presented by the authors and think it is a great tool for any organization undergoing culture change.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I listened to this book on audio and then bought it because I wanted to dig into it more. So I have not "officially" read it. It addresses the need to change the experiences employees and leaders have in order to change their beliefs which drive their actions and ultimately the results. It also addresses holding people accountable for their actions and results, and makes this difficult topic palatable. The book has lots of good graphics that step you through the process and make it easy to skim, I listened to this book on audio and then bought it because I wanted to dig into it more. So I have not "officially" read it. It addresses the need to change the experiences employees and leaders have in order to change their beliefs which drive their actions and ultimately the results. It also addresses holding people accountable for their actions and results, and makes this difficult topic palatable. The book has lots of good graphics that step you through the process and make it easy to skim, especially after having heard it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Yes, it is repetitive, but the authors are reinforcing lessons from previous works. It is designed to build upon earlier concepts and to take the learning to a higher level. It's supposed to be repetitive, at least to a degree. Negative reviews are not fully understanding the purpose and scope of this work. Oz provides the foundation; each successive book expands the learning and intended application. Yes, it is repetitive, but the authors are reinforcing lessons from previous works. It is designed to build upon earlier concepts and to take the learning to a higher level. It's supposed to be repetitive, at least to a degree. Negative reviews are not fully understanding the purpose and scope of this work. Oz provides the foundation; each successive book expands the learning and intended application.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dug

    Part 1 could be reduced to one chapter. Part 2 has more meat. The book is much more valuable if you have the opportunity to take the class given by Partners In Leadership. The concepts are simple but challenging to implement and maintain. If senior leadership is not on board to drive the change, it will be waste of time.

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