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The Rector and The Doctor's Family

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"She watched him as women often do watch men ... The incomprehensibleness of women is an old theory, but what is that to the curious wondering observation with which wives, mothers and sisters watch the other unreasoning animal ..!" These two short novels raise the curtain on an entrancing new world for all who love Jane Austen, George Eliot, and Trollope's "Barsetshire Ch "She watched him as women often do watch men ... The incomprehensibleness of women is an old theory, but what is that to the curious wondering observation with which wives, mothers and sisters watch the other unreasoning animal ..!" These two short novels raise the curtain on an entrancing new world for all who love Jane Austen, George Eliot, and Trollope's "Barsetshire Chronicles". The setting is Carlingford, a small town not far from London in the 1800s. The cast ranges from tradesmen to aristocracy and clergy ... The Rector opens as Carlingford awaits the arrival of their new rector. Will he be high church or low? And--for there are numerous unmarried ladies in Carlingford--will he be a bachelor? After fifteen years at All Souls the Rector fancies himself immune to womanhood: he is yet to encounter the blue ribbons and dimples of Miss Lucy Wodehouse. The Doctor's Family introduces us to the newly built quarter of Carlingford where young Dr Rider seeks his living. Already burdened by his improvident brother's return from Australia, he is appalled when his brother's family and sister-in-law, Nettie, follow him to Carlingford. But the susceptible doctor is yet to discover Nettie's attractions--and her indomitable Australian will.


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"She watched him as women often do watch men ... The incomprehensibleness of women is an old theory, but what is that to the curious wondering observation with which wives, mothers and sisters watch the other unreasoning animal ..!" These two short novels raise the curtain on an entrancing new world for all who love Jane Austen, George Eliot, and Trollope's "Barsetshire Ch "She watched him as women often do watch men ... The incomprehensibleness of women is an old theory, but what is that to the curious wondering observation with which wives, mothers and sisters watch the other unreasoning animal ..!" These two short novels raise the curtain on an entrancing new world for all who love Jane Austen, George Eliot, and Trollope's "Barsetshire Chronicles". The setting is Carlingford, a small town not far from London in the 1800s. The cast ranges from tradesmen to aristocracy and clergy ... The Rector opens as Carlingford awaits the arrival of their new rector. Will he be high church or low? And--for there are numerous unmarried ladies in Carlingford--will he be a bachelor? After fifteen years at All Souls the Rector fancies himself immune to womanhood: he is yet to encounter the blue ribbons and dimples of Miss Lucy Wodehouse. The Doctor's Family introduces us to the newly built quarter of Carlingford where young Dr Rider seeks his living. Already burdened by his improvident brother's return from Australia, he is appalled when his brother's family and sister-in-law, Nettie, follow him to Carlingford. But the susceptible doctor is yet to discover Nettie's attractions--and her indomitable Australian will.

30 review for The Rector and The Doctor's Family

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ali

    These days of course a series is a very popular thing, both with readers and booksellers. A series of books of course are by no means a new thing. Anthony Trollope’s Barsetshire chronicles for example have delighted readers for many a long year. Less well known perhaps though from a similar era, are the Chronicles of Carlingford by Mrs (Margaret) Oliphant. Written in the 1860’s they then spent many years out of print. The Rector (a short story) and The Doctor’s Family a short novel– were publish These days of course a series is a very popular thing, both with readers and booksellers. A series of books of course are by no means a new thing. Anthony Trollope’s Barsetshire chronicles for example have delighted readers for many a long year. Less well known perhaps though from a similar era, are the Chronicles of Carlingford by Mrs (Margaret) Oliphant. Written in the 1860’s they then spent many years out of print. The Rector (a short story) and The Doctor’s Family a short novel– were published together by Virago Modern Classics and are the first two stories in the series. The books are now best obtained either on Kindle or in second hand VMC’s – I have three of the next four books in the series (2 VMC’s and a penguin classic) and hope it will be as easy to pick up number 5, books 2, 3 and 4 are fairly chunky, this delightful little book serving as something of an introduction to Carlingford – much in the same way as The Warden does with Barsetshire. The Rector of the opening story is Mr Proctor – a middle aged clergyman who having spent the previous fifteen years cloistered happily away at All Souls, now takes up the living in Carlingford, in part to provide a comfortable home for his ageing mother. Mr Proctor is somewhat unused to the world is certainly unprepared for the blue ribboned prettiness of Miss Lucy Wodehouse. “The Rector was not vain – he did not think himself an Adonis; he did not understand anything about the matter, which indeed was beneath the consideration of a Fellow of All-Souls. But have not women been incomprehensible since ever there was in this world a pen with sufficient command of words to call them so? And is it not certain that, whether it may to their advantage or disadvantage, every soul of them is plotting to marry somebody?” In ‘The Doctor’s Family’ we meet the young Doctor Edward Rider, a bachelor who lives in the newer part of Carlingford, with a blue plaque outside his door bearing the legend M.R.C.S he ministers to those afraid of the word physician. It is Dr Marjoribanks in the older part of the town who has the practice Dr Rider coverts. However Edward’s elder and dissolute brother Fred has arrived back from Australia unexpectedly taking up idle residence in Edward’s house. Edward is incensed by his brother’s idle selfishness, and yet is little expecting to be faced by his brother’s wife Susan, three children and sister-in-law Nettie, arrived from the colonies to seek him out. Nettie is a small but determined young woman, she manages her family completely as Fred’s wife is as lazy and useless as he is himself. Only Nettie is able to manage the children, and it is only Nettie who has any money on which the family can live. Nettie secures the family some lodgings and her sister and brother-in-law much to Edward Riders disgust are happy to live upon her goodness and be managed absolutely by her. Dr Rider’s feeling towards Nettie inevitable lean towards romance and he is appalled that Nettie should be quite so content to sacrifice herself to others. “Edward Rider stared at his brother, speechless with rage and indignation. He could have rushed upon that listless figure, and startled the life half out of the nerveless slovenly frame. The state of mingled resentment, disappointment, and disgust he was in, made every particular of this aggravating scene tell more emphatically. To see that heavy vapour obscuring those walls which breathed of Nettie – to think of this one little centre of her life, which always hitherto had borne in some degree the impress of her womanly image, so polluted and vulgarised, overpowered the young man’s patience. Yet perhaps he of all men in the world had least right to interfere.” I absolutely loved this book. I hope it doesn’t spoil it for future readers to say that the ending is of course very satisfactory. Readers today may like to think ourselves oh so more sophisticated than in the 1860’s – but really? don’t we all rather like a happy ending? I am already a fan of Carlingford, and hope I find the next much fatter instalments of the series just as charming and readable.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wealhtheow

    Two sweet little novellas set in Carlingford, Oliphant's imaginary Victorian town. In "The Doctor's Family," young Dr. Rider is burdened with a small practice and a good-for-nothing older brother. When his brother's family tracks him down and requires his assistance, Dr.Rider is annoyed--until he falls in love with his sister-in-law's sister, the willful workhorse Nettie. Stubborn, practical, and devoted to her sentimental sister, Nettie refuses to be considered a martyr while simultaneously ref Two sweet little novellas set in Carlingford, Oliphant's imaginary Victorian town. In "The Doctor's Family," young Dr. Rider is burdened with a small practice and a good-for-nothing older brother. When his brother's family tracks him down and requires his assistance, Dr.Rider is annoyed--until he falls in love with his sister-in-law's sister, the willful workhorse Nettie. Stubborn, practical, and devoted to her sentimental sister, Nettie refuses to be considered a martyr while simultaneously refusing to be anything but selfless. I was surprised by how much I liked Nettie. "The Rector" follows Morley Proctor, a man who has lived all his life in the cloisters of All-Souls. After spending his youth in the driest of studies, he goes to Carlingford in pursuit of a slightly wider life--he hopes for a family of his own. But his decades in academia have not prepared him for the exigicies of being the pastor of a small town. He lacks any ability to relate to his fellow humans, or bring them comfort through Christ. Mr.Proctor struggles with the question of whether to return to his passionless, useless cloistered life or to stay in Carlingford, overwhelmed, overworked, but striving toward becoming a better human being.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Liz Mackie

    Having read and adored Miss Marjoribanks (pronounced, surprisingly, “Marchbanks”) this past year, I returned to Mrs Oliphant’s Carlingford novels to begin at the beginning with these two shorter but equally riveting comedies of love, manners, and sexual anxiety. Mrs Oliphant was disparaged by both George Eliot and Virginia Woolf, a one-two punch that would stagger any reputation. But I hope a reappraisal and a new century of keen delight and celebration might be in store for this generous, funny Having read and adored Miss Marjoribanks (pronounced, surprisingly, “Marchbanks”) this past year, I returned to Mrs Oliphant’s Carlingford novels to begin at the beginning with these two shorter but equally riveting comedies of love, manners, and sexual anxiety. Mrs Oliphant was disparaged by both George Eliot and Virginia Woolf, a one-two punch that would stagger any reputation. But I hope a reappraisal and a new century of keen delight and celebration might be in store for this generous, funny, and hard-working writer who quite possibly made her distinguished heiresses and critics rather jealous with her gifts for characterization and plot. (A previous reviewer share this link which is a gem: http://www.oliphantfiction.com/index.php.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jack Deighton

    Being two shorter works The Rector, not even novella length, and the more substantial The Doctor’s Family. In The Rector, the old Rector (profoundly Low Church, “lost in the deepest abysses of Evangelicalism”) has died. Mr Proctor - Fellow of All-Souls Oxford - has come to replace him but finds the practice of ministry very different from the academic life he has left. When his aged mother joins him she divines instantly that at least one of the churchwarden’s two daughters will be “intended” fo Being two shorter works The Rector, not even novella length, and the more substantial The Doctor’s Family. In The Rector, the old Rector (profoundly Low Church, “lost in the deepest abysses of Evangelicalism”) has died. Mr Proctor - Fellow of All-Souls Oxford - has come to replace him but finds the practice of ministry very different from the academic life he has left. When his aged mother joins him she divines instantly that at least one of the churchwarden’s two daughters will be “intended” for him. He is terrified and reflects, “But have not women been incomprehensible since ever there was in this world a pen with sufficient command of words to call them so? …. And is it not certain that .... every soul of them is plotting to marry somebody? …. Who could fathom the motives of a woman?” Meanwhile his mother, “watched him as women do often watch men, waiting till the creature should come to itself again and might be spoken to.” That fear, combined with Mr Proctor’s total inability to cope with the needs of a dying parishioner and the demands of sociability lead him to reconsider his position. The Doctor’s Family. Dr Edward Rider, not the pre-eminent physician in Carlingford - that would be Dr Marjoribanks - has the medical care of the less well-off of Carlingford society. His only burden is that of his waster of a brother Fred, back from the colonies under a cloud, indolent to a fault and an almost permanent resident in an easy-chair. Two ladies arrive at the door one day and Edward is astonished to find that Fred has a wife, Susan - and three more or less uncontrolled children - come over from Australia with Susan’s sister Nettie, who in turn has just about the means to support them. Nettie is the practical one, arranging lodgings for the ensemble in St Roques’s cottage, and undertaking all the work of the household. Edward becomes enamoured of Nettie, but her sense of duty to her sister’s family is so strong that she will not contemplate leaving them for anything. It is reasonably clear from Edward’s first encounter with Nettie where all this will be going. There are of course minor complications to the narrative, a potential rival for Nettie’s affections in the person of the permanent curate of St Roques’s Church, a tentative leaning towards Miss Marjoribanks while Edward works through his irritation at Nettie’s refusal of his own, but even when Fred dies, drowned in a canal after a night in the pub, Nettie will not abandon her duty. Only the entrance of Richard Chatham, another Australian, (un)distinguished by a luxuriant beard - not common in Carlingford in those days, only Mr Lake has such an affectation and his is very much subdued by comparison - changes the dyamic. Oliphant’s style is wordy, she was a nineteenth century novelist after all, but her eye for the human heart, for its predicaments, is sure.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joan Richardson

    50-year-old Mr Proctor has had a very satisfying life as Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. Now he has ventured out from that academic haven to become Rector of the parish church in Carlingford. Instead of adjusting gradually to his new surroundings, Mr Proctor becomes more and more uncomfortable in his role of parish clergyman. Finally his presence at the deathbed of a parishioner will bring his feelings to a crisis. This story also introduces members of Carlingford society who will be featur 50-year-old Mr Proctor has had a very satisfying life as Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. Now he has ventured out from that academic haven to become Rector of the parish church in Carlingford. Instead of adjusting gradually to his new surroundings, Mr Proctor becomes more and more uncomfortable in his role of parish clergyman. Finally his presence at the deathbed of a parishioner will bring his feelings to a crisis. This story also introduces members of Carlingford society who will be featured in future installments of the Carlingford series: 20-year-old Lucy Wodehouse; her middle-aged sister Mary; their father, the churchwarden; and Frank (Cecil) Wentworth, the Perpetual Curate of St Roque's, who does not yet quite realise that he is in love with Lucy. The Rector is the second of seven works set in the delightful country town of Carlingford. Free download of all seven works in the series can be found here: Chronicles of Carlingford

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    First in Mrs Oliphant's series of Carlingford novels. The first (short) tale of a rector who leaves his position in an Oxford university for a normal role in a small town- and finds himself seriously ill-suited - wasn't hugely gripping. But the main part of the tale is taken up with the most compelling Doctor's Family. Not, as you might imagine, a wife and children, but a dead-loss, alcoholic brother, who has billetede himself on his long-suffering brother after returning from Australia. And then First in Mrs Oliphant's series of Carlingford novels. The first (short) tale of a rector who leaves his position in an Oxford university for a normal role in a small town- and finds himself seriously ill-suited - wasn't hugely gripping. But the main part of the tale is taken up with the most compelling Doctor's Family. Not, as you might imagine, a wife and children, but a dead-loss, alcoholic brother, who has billetede himself on his long-suffering brother after returning from Australia. And then his abandoned wife and children come looking for him, along with his spirited sister-in-law, Nettie, who keeps it all together... Many trials and tribulations, most readable. Was further intrigued to discover that some think Carlingford might be my hometown of Aylesbury (the author's husband came here to create stained glass windows in St Mary's Church!)

  7. 5 out of 5

    belva hullp

    The Doctor's Family and Other Stories by Mrs Oliphant; VMC; ROOT; (4*) (a): The Executor: I thoroughly enjoyed this. Lovely but rather Victorian story, aren't they all lovely? (4*) (b): The Rector: Again I thoroughly enjoyed this Victorian short. I love how Mrs. Margaret Oliphant uses her words. (4 1/2*) (c): The Doctor's Family; An enjoyable story about a young woman who takes care of & provides for her sister & her family of 3 children. Yearning for but refusing to admit that she wants a life of The Doctor's Family and Other Stories by Mrs Oliphant; VMC; ROOT; (4*) (a): The Executor: I thoroughly enjoyed this. Lovely but rather Victorian story, aren't they all lovely? (4*) (b): The Rector: Again I thoroughly enjoyed this Victorian short. I love how Mrs. Margaret Oliphant uses her words. (4 1/2*) (c): The Doctor's Family; An enjoyable story about a young woman who takes care of & provides for her sister & her family of 3 children. Yearning for but refusing to admit that she wants a life of her own, she goes about her duties with a happy heart daily. I love a happy ending (sometimes) and I think our protagonist did as well. (4*) Lovely writing from Mrs. Oliphant.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sobriquet

    This is a collection of two short novels, I preferred 'The Rector' to 'The Doctor's Family'. What has made me rate this as only OK, is partly the style. It lacked conversations and told me how characters feeling, what their personalities were like and so on rather than letting me observe them. The way the story is related by the narrator is fine, but I couldn't really care about the characters, or consequently what happened to them. It's hard to say what is is exactly that put me off, style, cha This is a collection of two short novels, I preferred 'The Rector' to 'The Doctor's Family'. What has made me rate this as only OK, is partly the style. It lacked conversations and told me how characters feeling, what their personalities were like and so on rather than letting me observe them. The way the story is related by the narrator is fine, but I couldn't really care about the characters, or consequently what happened to them. It's hard to say what is is exactly that put me off, style, characters, my own mood. I'll try another Oliphant novel (perhaps not straight away) and see if a longer format works better for me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Although it was interesting to read something by a somewhat forgotten Victorian female author, I do find self-sacrificing Victorian heroines to be oh so irritating, I just want to give them a good shake. At least Nettie isn't as insufferably wet as most of them. Although it was interesting to read something by a somewhat forgotten Victorian female author, I do find self-sacrificing Victorian heroines to be oh so irritating, I just want to give them a good shake. At least Nettie isn't as insufferably wet as most of them.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

    https://piningforthewest.co.uk/2019/0... https://piningforthewest.co.uk/2019/0...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lynden Wade

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The first of the Chronicles of Carlingford Characters running through the 3 stories here are – Bessie Christian, dropped by Doctor Rider in “The Executor,” briefly appears in “The Doctor’s Family,” Dr Rider becomes a main character in “The Doctor’s Family,” the Wodehouse sisters are minor characters in all 3, with hints that there is the development of a love story between the curate and Lucy, and the curate plays minor roles in the 2nd and 3rd. There are plot development, too, because Dr Rider, The first of the Chronicles of Carlingford Characters running through the 3 stories here are – Bessie Christian, dropped by Doctor Rider in “The Executor,” briefly appears in “The Doctor’s Family,” Dr Rider becomes a main character in “The Doctor’s Family,” the Wodehouse sisters are minor characters in all 3, with hints that there is the development of a love story between the curate and Lucy, and the curate plays minor roles in the 2nd and 3rd. There are plot development, too, because Dr Rider, unable to bring himself to propose to Bessie in the first story because he would then take on her helpless parents, finds ironically in the 3rd that he is saddled with a helpless brother, and then when his sister in law arrives and takes his brother and dependants off his hands he is again faced with the fact that he loves a woman but cannot bring himself to take on her responsibilities too. MO is an anti-romantic, the notes at the front say. Having seen Bessie make a marriage of comfort rather than passion means I read “The Doctor’s Family” with more eagerness than the average romance, because I was not at all certain that Nettie and Doctor Rider would end up together, or even that it would be a good idea. Nettie and the doctor are drawn very well. Nettie sticks by her family regardless, but her fierce proud spirit and her insistence that there is no choice means she is not some tiresome good female doing her duty. Her dreadful sister complains about Nettie’s organisational powers, complaining that she manages things without consulting Susan’s wishes; are we to believe that Nettie can be a bit irritating? Or do we disregards Susan’s opinion, as she is a selfish, self-centred parasite? And interestingly, when she is relieved of it quite abruptly, she is distressed at being suddenly unnecessary. The doctor dashes round in his curricle thinking of sweeping Nettie off her feet, and raging when she is given no respect by her relatives but in fact is unheroic in his inability to accept her and her family together. He is better in a medical crisis, taking on the extra duties that a death in the family requires, and whilst this is not explored, it suggests that their marriage could succeed if they split their work according to ability and temperament. I like the use of details in their homes. I like the description of the cottage, with its ecclesiastical details that in fact make the apartment of the Smiths, the landlord and landlady, like a cell. I like the way in which Doctor Rider starts to see his own bachelor house in a different light when he comes home to find Nettie sitting in his chair, and he reacts too to Fred taking possession of his room (and later, of Nettie’s parlour) and Mrs Smith coming into his parlour. Nettie’s space in the cottage gradually gets taken over too, so while her marriage to the doctor may not be perfect, I wonder if she could have slid from competent manager of her sister’s family to drudge. I like, too, that the “lower” classes have names and characters, like Mrs Smith, whose speech suggests a lower class socially but who has a nice turn of phrase at times, and Mary, the doctor’s domestic, who might be a little slovenly or might merely be unable to be everywhere at once to attend the doctor’s erratic demands. And although some situations might seem hard to relate to in this century – like the duty to look after a lazy relative or the demands of a rector’s calling, a slightly closer look will show they are not so different from our times after all. We still wonder, as a society rather than as individuals, whether to help those who won’t help themselves. And I’m sure I’m not the only one who has wondered whether to stay in a job they are not equipped to do well in order not to let down others around them.

  12. 5 out of 5

    MaryBliss

    Oliphant really does do an excellent job of telling quiet, daily human stories that portray men and women dealing with the challenges of well-meaning lives. These two short novels, the second and third in her "Chronicles of Carlingsford" series, printed between 1862 and 1865, though quiet, stayed on my mind as I thought about the universal nature of the conflicts and struggles she portrayed in the lives of villagers a century and a half ago. These are not exciting, romantic or tragic plots, but Oliphant really does do an excellent job of telling quiet, daily human stories that portray men and women dealing with the challenges of well-meaning lives. These two short novels, the second and third in her "Chronicles of Carlingsford" series, printed between 1862 and 1865, though quiet, stayed on my mind as I thought about the universal nature of the conflicts and struggles she portrayed in the lives of villagers a century and a half ago. These are not exciting, romantic or tragic plots, but they are well-portrayed and sympathetic portrayals of good-hearted men and women on a small stage trying their best to rise to challenges that they face, but are far from expert at doing so. Penelope Fitzgerald's introduction to this Penguin edition points out the parallels between Oliphant's life and the life situation and choices of one of the protagonists, Nettie Underwood. Seeing that connection added to the thoughtfulness of the reading experience.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tom Walsh

    I am to summarize Chaps 9-12 on Yahoo Group otherlit Aug 2nd. I am ashamed to say, as an English major in a NE Corridor university, I was never exposed to Mrs. Oliphant! Her writing is witty, empathetic, but not overly sweet and innocent. In fact, she is more like Zola (who was born after her work) than Dickens. "The Doctor's Family" introduces us to some very well-developed characters. Nettie is the strong-willed SIL to Susan and Fred Rider. Fred is a lazy, unmotivated sloth, who gains most of I am to summarize Chaps 9-12 on Yahoo Group otherlit Aug 2nd. I am ashamed to say, as an English major in a NE Corridor university, I was never exposed to Mrs. Oliphant! Her writing is witty, empathetic, but not overly sweet and innocent. In fact, she is more like Zola (who was born after her work) than Dickens. "The Doctor's Family" introduces us to some very well-developed characters. Nettie is the strong-willed SIL to Susan and Fred Rider. Fred is a lazy, unmotivated sloth, who gains most of the humerous scenes, while Susan, a hand-wringer is under complete contol of Nettie. Nettie "likes" Dr. Rider, who seems sensible (the only one here!). I type "likes" because she cannot seem to commit herself to love, nor to affection. The complete control of her little family is her goal. Tragic events, however, interfere with the bubble of life, and that's all I can relate. If you like VicLit and are tired of Dickens and Trollope, open one of Oliphant's97 (ninety seven!!) novels.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

    Sort of Trollope without the know-all intrusive author - which sounds as if I don't like Trollope, which I do, so this was OK but just lacking that detachment. The characterisations are excellent, the writing fluent and the ambience gentle. I'm surprised costume drama television hasn't found this author yet. Sort of Trollope without the know-all intrusive author - which sounds as if I don't like Trollope, which I do, so this was OK but just lacking that detachment. The characterisations are excellent, the writing fluent and the ambience gentle. I'm surprised costume drama television hasn't found this author yet.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Selene

    A lot of exposition, which gets difficult given the length of the book and your desire to hear the characters converse. That said, I continue to be astounded by Oliphant's fascinating female characters. A lot of exposition, which gets difficult given the length of the book and your desire to hear the characters converse. That said, I continue to be astounded by Oliphant's fascinating female characters.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Corinna Laughlin

    "The Rector" is a short story, "The Doctor's Family" a short novel. Nettie, the heroine, is described as a fairy way too many times. Still, it was charming. "The Rector" is a short story, "The Doctor's Family" a short novel. Nettie, the heroine, is described as a fairy way too many times. Still, it was charming.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  18. 4 out of 5

    Austenfan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Diane Wilkes

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anne Battye

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sonia Johnson

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  23. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  24. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bookgirl

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kalie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gregory

  29. 4 out of 5

    Terriann Rea-gaustad

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura

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