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Made for Happiness

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In Made for Happiness, Jean Vanier examines the basis for modern moral philosophy and its role in our lives today. Having discovered through his work with the intellectually disabled the degree to which our society is divided, and our values misplaced, Vanier invites us to read with fresh eyes theories of happiness written 2,400 years ago. The book follows the links between In Made for Happiness, Jean Vanier examines the basis for modern moral philosophy and its role in our lives today. Having discovered through his work with the intellectually disabled the degree to which our society is divided, and our values misplaced, Vanier invites us to read with fresh eyes theories of happiness written 2,400 years ago. The book follows the links between psychology, spirituality, and morality: psychology helps us face our fears and limitations; spirituality gives us strength; and morality helps us to choose the best actions, those that will make us happier, and thus more human. The combination of these paths to knowledge and wisdom gives meaning to our lives and allows us to make the best use of our freedom on our way to happiness.


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In Made for Happiness, Jean Vanier examines the basis for modern moral philosophy and its role in our lives today. Having discovered through his work with the intellectually disabled the degree to which our society is divided, and our values misplaced, Vanier invites us to read with fresh eyes theories of happiness written 2,400 years ago. The book follows the links between In Made for Happiness, Jean Vanier examines the basis for modern moral philosophy and its role in our lives today. Having discovered through his work with the intellectually disabled the degree to which our society is divided, and our values misplaced, Vanier invites us to read with fresh eyes theories of happiness written 2,400 years ago. The book follows the links between psychology, spirituality, and morality: psychology helps us face our fears and limitations; spirituality gives us strength; and morality helps us to choose the best actions, those that will make us happier, and thus more human. The combination of these paths to knowledge and wisdom gives meaning to our lives and allows us to make the best use of our freedom on our way to happiness.

51 review for Made for Happiness

  1. 4 out of 5

    J.L. Slipak

    In Made for Happiness, Jean Vanier examines the basis for modern moral philosophy and its role in our lives today. Having discovered through his work with the intellectually disabled the degree to which our society is divided, and our values misplaced, Vanier invites us to read with fresh eyes theories of happiness written 2,400 years ago. The book follows the links between psychology, spirituality, and morality: psychology helps us face our fears and limitations; spirituality gives us strength; In Made for Happiness, Jean Vanier examines the basis for modern moral philosophy and its role in our lives today. Having discovered through his work with the intellectually disabled the degree to which our society is divided, and our values misplaced, Vanier invites us to read with fresh eyes theories of happiness written 2,400 years ago. The book follows the links between psychology, spirituality, and morality: psychology helps us face our fears and limitations; spirituality gives us strength; and morality helps us to choose the best actions, those that will make us happier, and thus more human. The combination of these paths to knowledge and wisdom gives meaning to our lives and allows us to make the best use of our freedom on our way to happiness. Lucidly written, Made for Happiness links classical thought to contemporary challenges, and nourishes the heart and mind. This new edition includes an introduction by Ian Brown. MY THOUGHTS: I received this edition in exchange for my honest review. Can we say gorgeous cover or what? I absolutely love it and it will look great among the classics on my shelf. This is one man’s interpretation of a great philosopher’s work on how to be happy during Aristotle’s time. It’s an easy piece to read, a bit dry, but well worth the effort. Vanier was an outcast or “excluded” member of society. He explains how Aristotle’s teacher was Plato and how Aristotle didn’t agree with Plato’s theoretical spirituality teachings. I absolutely love how Aristotle feels that being human means becoming as perfectly accomplished as humanly possible in all aspects of life–academically, politically, scientifically, and personally. Achieving happiness is by committing humane acts–by being good in all ways. We all have the potential to be good, but we must rise above those things that have the potential for bringing out the bad in us. He talks about being a leader, not a follower, not to settle for what others think and do but to question, disagree, disgust and make choices that benefit you personally to enhance your own personal growth in good, humane fashion. Vanier points out some of Aristotle’s short-comings: snobbery, racism, sexism, etc. It’s an interesting breakdown. You may find that Aristotle’s philosophies make a lot of sense, and some of Vanier’s interpretations are questionable and interesting. There’s the flip side too, where some of Aristotle’s thoughts/feelings will make your head shake. The book gives you interesting insights as to where issues of snobbery, racism, sexism and others came from and how far back in history these horrible concepts were founded. This book is thought provoking, easy to read (thank goodness), and very much so recommended by me. It’s a great collector’s book too with such a beautiful cover, not too thick and in paperback format. Overall, whether you agree with Vanier’s interpretations, and Aristotle’s insights, you will find this read very interesting.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Weber

    I'm leaving this unrated (and pretty much this is a non-review). I looked this book up after finding out about Vanier's sexual assault history (https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montre...), because I remembered I had read a book by him. But it looks like I never added it to my Goodreads. I can't recall the book itself; I remember coming upon it because I was interested in different versions of existentialism... but the best my memory can recollect is that I was put off by the religious aspect. Anyways I'm leaving this unrated (and pretty much this is a non-review). I looked this book up after finding out about Vanier's sexual assault history (https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montre...), because I remembered I had read a book by him. But it looks like I never added it to my Goodreads. I can't recall the book itself; I remember coming upon it because I was interested in different versions of existentialism... but the best my memory can recollect is that I was put off by the religious aspect. Anyways, it's interesting now... knowing what we know about the man; and yet still taking the content of the book at face value. It's hard. Like R. Kelly's Remix to Ignition. Such a great song. Such a horrible man.

  3. 4 out of 5

    J. Robert

    Good introduction to Aristotle. I find the writing style can be a bit annoying - framing things as questions and that sort of thing. But John Vanier is no doubt one of the modern human rights heroes of our age and it's nice to see some attempt at reconciling the Ancients to contemporary human rights philosophy. Easy to read and a good beginner introduction to Aristotle's moral thought for someone who's never studied philosophy. Good introduction to Aristotle. I find the writing style can be a bit annoying - framing things as questions and that sort of thing. But John Vanier is no doubt one of the modern human rights heroes of our age and it's nice to see some attempt at reconciling the Ancients to contemporary human rights philosophy. Easy to read and a good beginner introduction to Aristotle's moral thought for someone who's never studied philosophy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marsmannix

    NOT an easy read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Suzie

    Not bad. Made me a little more friendly towards Aristotle. I used to view him as a bad influence on the Catholic Church due to his obvious issues with sexuality. Now I see that his views are, for the most part, sterile in nature and lack humanity in many arenas. He's too theoretical for my taste and as such way too 'black and white' in his thinking. Not bad. Made me a little more friendly towards Aristotle. I used to view him as a bad influence on the Catholic Church due to his obvious issues with sexuality. Now I see that his views are, for the most part, sterile in nature and lack humanity in many arenas. He's too theoretical for my taste and as such way too 'black and white' in his thinking.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Czarny Pies

    This is an outstanding introduction to the philosophy of Artistotle intended for the Catholic lay person. It would also be of use history students wishing to understand the link between Aristotle and Catholic theology. For what is a very short read, it delivers tremendous benefits.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    This is a theoretical look at happiness and the the philosophy of Aristotle. It is a hard read but well worth it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    210713: Christian interpretation of Aristotle.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Dreesmann Al-Shihabi

  10. 5 out of 5

    Roland Kawka

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cory Dupont

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Diver

  14. 4 out of 5

    Carlo

  15. 5 out of 5

    Luke

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ramona

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pierre-Jean Eude

  18. 4 out of 5

    Travis Timmons

  19. 4 out of 5

    John Donnelly

  20. 4 out of 5

    Darrin Belousek

  21. 5 out of 5

    Louis

  22. 4 out of 5

    Margo

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anders Jecha

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Moore

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bjorn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Sullivan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tariq

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael Condran

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vern

  31. 5 out of 5

    Young

  32. 4 out of 5

    House of Anansi and Groundwood Books

  33. 4 out of 5

    Joelaf

  34. 5 out of 5

    David

  35. 4 out of 5

    Graeme

  36. 5 out of 5

    EunSung

  37. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  38. 4 out of 5

    A I

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sheena

  40. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemay

  41. 5 out of 5

    Cesar Agudelo

  42. 4 out of 5

    Kapamalo

  43. 4 out of 5

    Seth Forwood

  44. 4 out of 5

    Phil Cooke

  45. 5 out of 5

    Brian Currie

  46. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Reeson

  47. 5 out of 5

    Astuti

  48. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  49. 5 out of 5

    Daymian

  50. 4 out of 5

    Karl Möller

  51. 5 out of 5

    Steve Rose

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