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Justice League of America, Vol. 8: Dark Things

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Bursting from the pages of BRIGHTEST DAY comes an all-new team-up of the Justice League of America and the Justice Society of America!The return of the hero called Jade in the pages of BLACKEST NIGHT heralds the release of the powerful Starheart that empowers her father, Green Lantern Alan Scott. Now this chaotic force is unleashed on Earth, causing magic to go wild – and Bursting from the pages of BRIGHTEST DAY comes an all-new team-up of the Justice League of America and the Justice Society of America!The return of the hero called Jade in the pages of BLACKEST NIGHT heralds the release of the powerful Starheart that empowers her father, Green Lantern Alan Scott. Now this chaotic force is unleashed on Earth, causing magic to go wild – and new metahumans to emerge! It’s more than one super team can handle, but can even the combined efforts of the Justice League and the Justice Society contain the light and dark power wielded by one of their own? Collects Justice League of America #44-48, Justice Society of America #41-42


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Bursting from the pages of BRIGHTEST DAY comes an all-new team-up of the Justice League of America and the Justice Society of America!The return of the hero called Jade in the pages of BLACKEST NIGHT heralds the release of the powerful Starheart that empowers her father, Green Lantern Alan Scott. Now this chaotic force is unleashed on Earth, causing magic to go wild – and Bursting from the pages of BRIGHTEST DAY comes an all-new team-up of the Justice League of America and the Justice Society of America!The return of the hero called Jade in the pages of BLACKEST NIGHT heralds the release of the powerful Starheart that empowers her father, Green Lantern Alan Scott. Now this chaotic force is unleashed on Earth, causing magic to go wild – and new metahumans to emerge! It’s more than one super team can handle, but can even the combined efforts of the Justice League and the Justice Society contain the light and dark power wielded by one of their own? Collects Justice League of America #44-48, Justice Society of America #41-42

30 review for Justice League of America, Vol. 8: Dark Things

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    A bland JLA / JSA team-up that is nothing more than one prolonged fight. Alan Scott is taken over by the Starheart and the Starheart starts driving random heroes crazy as he grows in power. James Robinson used to be one of my favorite writers but a decade away in Hollywood seems to have robbed him of that special something he used to put into books like Starman and Leave It to Chance. A bland JLA / JSA team-up that is nothing more than one prolonged fight. Alan Scott is taken over by the Starheart and the Starheart starts driving random heroes crazy as he grows in power. James Robinson used to be one of my favorite writers but a decade away in Hollywood seems to have robbed him of that special something he used to put into books like Starman and Leave It to Chance.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    3.5 stars This was a pretty solid story. I haven't been following Justice League, so there were some parts of the plot that were a bit shaky to me. However, the majority of it was easy to follow. It starts off with Jade (back from the dead after Blackest Night) being carried to earth encased in a huge hunk of the Starheart. Random superpeople go insane, and her father starts to look a lot like Parallax. Except not. Made up mostly of B-list or obscure heroes, this is a fun way to spend the afternoo 3.5 stars This was a pretty solid story. I haven't been following Justice League, so there were some parts of the plot that were a bit shaky to me. However, the majority of it was easy to follow. It starts off with Jade (back from the dead after Blackest Night) being carried to earth encased in a huge hunk of the Starheart. Random superpeople go insane, and her father starts to look a lot like Parallax. Except not. Made up mostly of B-list or obscure heroes, this is a fun way to spend the afternoon.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anchorpete

    Isn't the title for this trade really lame? I just read this, and I am not completely sure how the title relates to the actual story. The title of this trade is similar to how I felt about this book, and how I feel about James Robinson- ambiguous to the point of confusion. I have read a bit Robinson's work, all of his Starman stuff, most of his superman work, and The Golden Age. The Golden Age and Starman are fantastic, comic book Masterpieces that do not get the amount of praise that they deser Isn't the title for this trade really lame? I just read this, and I am not completely sure how the title relates to the actual story. The title of this trade is similar to how I felt about this book, and how I feel about James Robinson- ambiguous to the point of confusion. I have read a bit Robinson's work, all of his Starman stuff, most of his superman work, and The Golden Age. The Golden Age and Starman are fantastic, comic book Masterpieces that do not get the amount of praise that they deserve, always overshadowed by Sandman and Watchmen and the Dark Knight Rises. Then, there is his Superman work and this. There is no personality here, it is just generic stuff that could have come out of the 90s. I suppose, since this particular story focuses on members of Infinity Inc and their connection to the Justice Society, that makes it stand out against other pre - new 52 books, but other than that, there wasn't anything in this book that made me want to keep reading.

  4. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    It's amazing that a book series that started off so well, has died with such a pathetic whimper. It's amazing that a book series that started off so well, has died with such a pathetic whimper.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    What I like most about James Robinson's work is his use of obscure characters. There are a number of panels full of characters I have barely even heard of and makes me interested in the back stories of these lesser characters. As anjoyable as this book was at times, this is far from Robinson's best work. The dialogue is weak for someone of his calibre (I lost track of how many times a character said "In God's name..."). It's an interesting idea to have so many thought balloons in a book to displ What I like most about James Robinson's work is his use of obscure characters. There are a number of panels full of characters I have barely even heard of and makes me interested in the back stories of these lesser characters. As anjoyable as this book was at times, this is far from Robinson's best work. The dialogue is weak for someone of his calibre (I lost track of how many times a character said "In God's name..."). It's an interesting idea to have so many thought balloons in a book to display what each "hero" thinks about during a story. I don't think he quite got it right here though, many of the thoughts were repetetive or, again, weak. Mark Bagley is far from my favourite artist and this is definately NOT his A game. It might be down to the fact his pencilling 2 series in this book and he ended up having to rush. My main irk with his work is he makes every character look 5 years younger than they actually are. This book was okay, it was by no means the worst book i've read but I know Robinson can do better.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eskana

    Another lesson in "Why not to jump into comic book stories you know nothing about..." Knowing this was coming out of "Brightest Day" would've helped with understanding the plot a little bit (there was nothing about it on the inside flap), but really, I was a little out of my depth here. We've got a plot involving the JSA, the JSA All-stars (did not even know that was a team), some Titans, and a smattering of other small-time characters. Sheesh, I thought I knew a lot of smaller characters, but no Another lesson in "Why not to jump into comic book stories you know nothing about..." Knowing this was coming out of "Brightest Day" would've helped with understanding the plot a little bit (there was nothing about it on the inside flap), but really, I was a little out of my depth here. We've got a plot involving the JSA, the JSA All-stars (did not even know that was a team), some Titans, and a smattering of other small-time characters. Sheesh, I thought I knew a lot of smaller characters, but not being familiar with the JSA really was a disadvantage here. This is also not a very self-contained story arc. Some trades are very concise, and you get begining, middle, and end of a story. Here, though, you have to jump in knowing not only the characters I mentioned above, but how they are related, or previous relationships. You have to be able to catch that this Batman is Dick Grayson, although it's not mentioned (luckily, Dick does not act like Batman, plus he's teaming up with Titans like Donna Troy, so I was able to figure that out.) The art is nice by the panel structure seems cluttered and messy, and it was kinda hard to see which direction to read it in. Plot Synopsis: I'll try to summarize the best I can.... Alan Scott, the original Green Lantern (who's not technically a real Green Lantern, but whatever,) is dying on Earth. His daughter Jennie, aka Jade, who had died (I guess) previously, arrives on Earth powered by the "Starheart," some kind of mysterious power that was what originally powered Alan's lantern. But the power of the Starheart begins possessing metas across Earth and making them go crazy and attack everyone. So the JSA, Batman, Donna Troy, Congo Bill, Starman (Mikaal), Mr. Terrific, Mr. Miracle II, Felix Faust, Kyle Rayner, and a bunch of other people (it's crowded) go on a complicated goose-chase trying to find what they need to save Alan. It was confusing, and it didn't help that I didn't know who half the people were, and didn't care about the other half. But I have a hard time believing that even if you liked these people, you'd like this story. Every comic is someone's first, and as a new reader, I will tell you that this collection did a very poor job of introducing ANY of these characters or getting me to care. This collection is for fans only.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Will Montgomery

    On the individual merits alone, I would give this a 3.5 or a 3.25. I give it a 4 here because it has a lot of characters that I personally like, I'm very familiar with the romantic entanglement of Kyle Rayner, Donna Troy, and Jenny Hayden, I like how the story used Michael Holt and Karen Star, & Mark Bagley is one of my favorite artists. But if you like JLA/JSA crossovers & "Epic Scale" comic stories I would recommend this. On the individual merits alone, I would give this a 3.5 or a 3.25. I give it a 4 here because it has a lot of characters that I personally like, I'm very familiar with the romantic entanglement of Kyle Rayner, Donna Troy, and Jenny Hayden, I like how the story used Michael Holt and Karen Star, & Mark Bagley is one of my favorite artists. But if you like JLA/JSA crossovers & "Epic Scale" comic stories I would recommend this.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rylan

    Robinson’s run starts to finally find its footing and gets a direction. I’m a huge fan of this roster, using the second gen versions of the OG Justice League is a really cool idea. The story is really good I liked all the stuff with the starheart and Jade. Overall this was a very solid read and a way bigger improvement over the first volume.

  9. 5 out of 5

    J. Griff

    Not much to say about this storyline. Standard crossover between two teams, world ending problem, & finding a solution in the nick of time. There are obvious foreshadowing for future stories. On a positive note I do love Mark Bagley’s artwork.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Duncan

    A whole story without killing ONE major character - And even the backup feature was murder-free!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eldon Farrell

    I think I'll take a break from this series. It's reached absurd levels here :( I think I'll take a break from this series. It's reached absurd levels here :(

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jason Tanner

    Robinson and Bagley seem to be having a blast on this title, and I'm really digging it. Robinson and Bagley seem to be having a blast on this title, and I'm really digging it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dave Anderson

    Firstly, I am a fan of James Robinson. I've enjoyed The Golden Age; his recent Fantastic Four run; but especially his Starman. I will probably end up grabbing either this trade paperback or putting the individual issues on my bucket list simply for James Robinson and Mark Bagley. There are a couple of things though. This is Justice-Titans. It's not enough of one or the other. I'd pay good money to read Robinson write The Magnificent Seven. I'd pay good money to read James Robinson write either t Firstly, I am a fan of James Robinson. I've enjoyed The Golden Age; his recent Fantastic Four run; but especially his Starman. I will probably end up grabbing either this trade paperback or putting the individual issues on my bucket list simply for James Robinson and Mark Bagley. There are a couple of things though. This is Justice-Titans. It's not enough of one or the other. I'd pay good money to read Robinson write The Magnificent Seven. I'd pay good money to read James Robinson write either the original Teen Titans or New Teen Titans. I'd pay good money to read him revive the classic, original Infinity, Inc. Based on his The Golden Age, Justice Society and Starman, he has an awesome sense of history. I'd love to see that on Justice League or Titans. I'd love to see him write a Golden Age sidekicks story! As a fan, I liked this story. However for a JLA-JSA team-up, it was a soup. A hybrid of characters. None of the original seven. Too many characters to the point of brushing cameos aside. The Demon shows up, and when he's changed back to Jason Blood, he's actually invited to leave!- like he's David Banner - and he does. The best JLA-JSA team-ups feature a small core team. This is like a Cecil B. DeMille grand production. I'm still trying to figure out how Obsidian got the better of The Shade...? How did that happen? This is so epic - it's almost too epic if that's possible. There are so many characters and so many voices. This could maybe work as a novel, each chapter a different point of view. Or a shifting point of view. The final problem is who the villain turns out to be. Don't heroes fight bad guys anymore? There are actually no villains in this story, except heroes gone bad. I've read so many stories where Todd Rice's Obsidian is rogue, I am weary. I would love to see Robinson write The Magnificent Seven versus one or more of their classic adversaries. Same for the Titans and Infinity, Inc. Taken for what it is, it's pretty okay. I enjoyed it for Robinson's unique voice and Bagley's art. Robinson is one of my go-to authors.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    James Robinson seems to be intent of having fun and creating toss away minor characters upon his return to comics after about a decade in Hollywood. What attracted me to this TPB is that hits on one of my Justice League guilty pleasures-a JLA/JSA combined adventure. Here Jennie Lynn Haden, whom a previous writer had killed off (aka friged), is being returned to the land of the living. Much like his British compatriots, Grant Morrison and Alan Moore (yes that Alan Moore) Robinson loves to delve in James Robinson seems to be intent of having fun and creating toss away minor characters upon his return to comics after about a decade in Hollywood. What attracted me to this TPB is that hits on one of my Justice League guilty pleasures-a JLA/JSA combined adventure. Here Jennie Lynn Haden, whom a previous writer had killed off (aka friged), is being returned to the land of the living. Much like his British compatriots, Grant Morrison and Alan Moore (yes that Alan Moore) Robinson loves to delve into DC Comics trivia. In addition to resurrecting Jennie aka Jade we get her brother, the Starheart mythology, her father (and a cameo by his wife a former villain), and a decently paced story. When he returned to DC Robinson took over a Superman title featuring Mon-El, and in an one issue story took Mon on a world tour and tossed in about half a dozen characters in foreign lands whom frankly I wanted to see more of. Here he does the same thing creating the German equivalent of the Rocket Red Brigade and he uses them quite well for the brief time the characters are int he story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Yuck. Picked this up from my library as a quick read during my lunch break, and wish I hadn't wasted my time. I loved James Robinson's "Starman" series, and really WANT him to be able to write established characters/teams with the same fresh perspective, but... this was just a mess. Too many characters, too little characterization; heroes and villains drop in and out with little logic. The plot doesn't make any sense. Dialogue is horrendous, and the fight scenes feel so posed, so inert. Plus, it Yuck. Picked this up from my library as a quick read during my lunch break, and wish I hadn't wasted my time. I loved James Robinson's "Starman" series, and really WANT him to be able to write established characters/teams with the same fresh perspective, but... this was just a mess. Too many characters, too little characterization; heroes and villains drop in and out with little logic. The plot doesn't make any sense. Dialogue is horrendous, and the fight scenes feel so posed, so inert. Plus, it simultaneously requires you to know a lot of back-story of many of the heroes, while ignoring other aspects of their pasts. With crap like this, I understand why DC felt the need to re-set their entire universe.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    Due to the various events happening in DC comics and editorial interference, James Robinson's JLA run was a pretty uneven thing. Shame, as when he's good, it's a really entertaining read and shows how good it could have been if he'd just been left alone. This JLA/JSA team up is a solid example of how good this comic could have been as well as a nice throw back to the team ups of old. He has a good handle on all the heroes, gives everyone something to do and makes good use of DC history to tell his Due to the various events happening in DC comics and editorial interference, James Robinson's JLA run was a pretty uneven thing. Shame, as when he's good, it's a really entertaining read and shows how good it could have been if he'd just been left alone. This JLA/JSA team up is a solid example of how good this comic could have been as well as a nice throw back to the team ups of old. He has a good handle on all the heroes, gives everyone something to do and makes good use of DC history to tell his story. Liked his smaller line-up and use of stand ins for big gun heroes.

  17. 5 out of 5

    TJ Shelby

    I was wondering when this would happen. Not if but when. Knowing that Robinson had spent time writing for JSA, I had a feeling a crossover was coming. Luckily for me, I liked Robinson's JSA days and he doesn't disappoint here. The return of Jade during Blackest Night and how the Starheart affects her, her father and other heroes spawns the entire theme of this book. Powergirl and Supergirl...enough said. I was wondering when this would happen. Not if but when. Knowing that Robinson had spent time writing for JSA, I had a feeling a crossover was coming. Luckily for me, I liked Robinson's JSA days and he doesn't disappoint here. The return of Jade during Blackest Night and how the Starheart affects her, her father and other heroes spawns the entire theme of this book. Powergirl and Supergirl...enough said.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    As a Robinson fan, it is very hard for me to admit, but I thought this book was awful. Too many different voices giving us internal monologues at once. Dialogue is stilted as well, and I'm not a big fan of Bagley's art either. But one reason why the book doesn't work for me is that the team isn't what it should be. I'd LOVE to see Robinson write the REAL Justice League (and Starman and Congorilla, natch) rather than these substitutes. As a Robinson fan, it is very hard for me to admit, but I thought this book was awful. Too many different voices giving us internal monologues at once. Dialogue is stilted as well, and I'm not a big fan of Bagley's art either. But one reason why the book doesn't work for me is that the team isn't what it should be. I'd LOVE to see Robinson write the REAL Justice League (and Starman and Congorilla, natch) rather than these substitutes.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    Public library copy. Unfortunately this story appears to be editorially driven as the thrust of the story is about resurrecting a deceased character. I'm not sure why the story was told under the JLA banner as the main cast feature characters from JSA and Teen Titans. Public library copy. Unfortunately this story appears to be editorially driven as the thrust of the story is about resurrecting a deceased character. I'm not sure why the story was told under the JLA banner as the main cast feature characters from JSA and Teen Titans.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Sadly, Robinson isn’t able to give much depth to this large crossover cast. That’s a shame when the core of the comic is a big, overly decompressed fight. A lot more could have been done with the space.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    Very choppy, especially in dialogue. Art is average. Robinson starts off large in scope, but can not hold together the panoply of characters and trifecta of narratives. The result is a rushed ending lacking in catharsis.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    An interesting romp and the Robinson JLA held together better than I expected it to, even though the mix was too strange to truly be either organic or more than temporary. Seriously--Congorilla & the 70's Starman? An interesting romp and the Robinson JLA held together better than I expected it to, even though the mix was too strange to truly be either organic or more than temporary. Seriously--Congorilla & the 70's Starman?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    I have always enjoyed the JLA, in all it's various incarnations through the decades. This new modern JLA is a very enjoyable read. Great art and plot make this JLA a great read for an older fan or a perfect place for a new fan. Very recommended I have always enjoyed the JLA, in all it's various incarnations through the decades. This new modern JLA is a very enjoyable read. Great art and plot make this JLA a great read for an older fan or a perfect place for a new fan. Very recommended

  24. 4 out of 5

    Esther

    There is not a single world in which Batman is not Bruce Wayne that I can honestly say I like. :(

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Another review where I express incomprehension at how bad James Robinson's comics often are when he was also the writer of the peerless art deco/hipster superhero epic Starman. Another review where I express incomprehension at how bad James Robinson's comics often are when he was also the writer of the peerless art deco/hipster superhero epic Starman.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    The best part of this trade was seeing Dick Grayson maturing as his own version of the Batman.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Graham Bailey

    This book is all over the place; cluttered and messy. Writing is sub-par and art is adequate.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    too busy, too many characters that got just too confusing.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Forgot how much I didn't really like The Justice League Society. Lame story with even lamer dialogues. Forgot how much I didn't really like The Justice League Society. Lame story with even lamer dialogues.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Koen

    Wut wut wut... this was just a mess. Way too many characters, trying so much.. Couldn't follow this whatsoever.. Really had to struggle to finish this one. Wut wut wut... this was just a mess. Way too many characters, trying so much.. Couldn't follow this whatsoever.. Really had to struggle to finish this one.

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