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V roce 2007 zaujal Robbinse v New Yorkeru kreslený vtip zasazený do baru, kde sedí ob několik stoliček od sebe byznysmen a šupák, a muž v obleku komentuje jejich společnou žízeň: "Pochybuju, že by se dobře prodávala dětská knížka o pivu." Robbinsovi se to tak zalíbilo, že se rozhodl takovou knihu napsat. Pivo a mnohé o něm je jednotícím prvkem v příběhu o šestileté předško V roce 2007 zaujal Robbinse v New Yorkeru kreslený vtip zasazený do baru, kde sedí ob několik stoliček od sebe byznysmen a šupák, a muž v obleku komentuje jejich společnou žízeň: "Pochybuju, že by se dobře prodávala dětská knížka o pivu." Robbinsovi se to tak zalíbilo, že se rozhodl takovou knihu napsat. Pivo a mnohé o něm je jednotícím prvkem v příběhu o šestileté předškolačce Grácii Perkelové, která tráví čas nejraději se svým strýčkem Moem, jenž pivu značně holduje. Grácie si občas sama přihne a pak se jí zjevuje pivní víla, která ji odnáší do jiného světa.


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V roce 2007 zaujal Robbinse v New Yorkeru kreslený vtip zasazený do baru, kde sedí ob několik stoliček od sebe byznysmen a šupák, a muž v obleku komentuje jejich společnou žízeň: "Pochybuju, že by se dobře prodávala dětská knížka o pivu." Robbinsovi se to tak zalíbilo, že se rozhodl takovou knihu napsat. Pivo a mnohé o něm je jednotícím prvkem v příběhu o šestileté předško V roce 2007 zaujal Robbinse v New Yorkeru kreslený vtip zasazený do baru, kde sedí ob několik stoliček od sebe byznysmen a šupák, a muž v obleku komentuje jejich společnou žízeň: "Pochybuju, že by se dobře prodávala dětská knížka o pivu." Robbinsovi se to tak zalíbilo, že se rozhodl takovou knihu napsat. Pivo a mnohé o něm je jednotícím prvkem v příběhu o šestileté předškolačce Grácii Perkelové, která tráví čas nejraději se svým strýčkem Moem, jenž pivu značně holduje. Grácie si občas sama přihne a pak se jí zjevuje pivní víla, která ji odnáší do jiného světa.

30 review for P jako pivo

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I see you. Yes, you. The Tom Robbins fan. Quit making that face. Yank out the wedgie. Relax, man! This two-star rating bears no reflection on YOU. I’m not giving YOU two stars. I’m not even giving Tom Robbins two stars. It’s just that B is for Beer is terribly disappointing. I mean, you see the cover, right? Look at it! Look how totally awesome and retro it looks, right? You see the Simpson-esque largesse of the stein, with a hoard of dance-happy (overly long-armed) adults surrounding? They’re l I see you. Yes, you. The Tom Robbins fan. Quit making that face. Yank out the wedgie. Relax, man! This two-star rating bears no reflection on YOU. I’m not giving YOU two stars. I’m not even giving Tom Robbins two stars. It’s just that B is for Beer is terribly disappointing. I mean, you see the cover, right? Look at it! Look how totally awesome and retro it looks, right? You see the Simpson-esque largesse of the stein, with a hoard of dance-happy (overly long-armed) adults surrounding? They’re living the good life, gazing up at the cup which runneth over, celebrating the rush of good energy that races through any crowd of joyful imbibers. Such promise! Such hope! Can such pure, overwhelming joy really emanate from these 125 pages? When I finish reading this book, will I feel as gleeful as the people on the cover? Meh. The fact of the matter is, B is for Beer is sort of a textbook. And a boring one. It’s hard to make beer production interesting, because, let’s face facts, science and agriculture are fascinating, but not as fascinating as, say, sex. Or murders. Or time travel. (Wait, unless it’s sex with a time-traveling scientist, dragging you with him across space and time as he attempts to outrun the contract on his head!) I digress... So, yeah, B is for Beer is sorta textbooky. Even the arrival of a Beer Fairy doesn’t do much to make the adventure wilder or more brewski-like. And it doesn’t help that the protagonist is a 6-year-old girl. We’re meant to believe that this 6-year-old girl is quite cute, quite smart, and quite curious, but frankly, I don’t even buy into the fact that she’s a 6-year-old girl, let alone a cute, smart, and curious 6-year-old girl. I’m bored. Let us then quell my boredom and discuss two points which I found to be lovely, uplifting, scenic points. 1. Costa Rica. 6-year-old Gracie’s uncle moves to Costa Rica. Did you know that Costa Rica has free health care, has a zillion national parks, and has no military? Sign me up! I wanna move to Costa Rica!!! 2. Sappy quotes. As Gracie and the Beer Fairy part ways after rescuing a young ingenue from impending doom, the fairy says to Gracie, “I want you to promise me that you’ll always be this brave, that when exploiters disguised as public servants offer you protection from puffed-up dangers, you’ll turn your back and skip away. Promise me you won’t be afraid of travel, of people different than yourself, of spiders, bats, bullies, dentists, attorneys, peer pressure, bad taste, social disapproval, insecurity, Sugar Elves... That you won’t quake before old men with titles, and most especially, that you’ll never be afraid to love, not even when there’s a chance you aren’t being loved in return.” Oh. My. God. You tugged my heart strings and jerked my tears, Tom Robbins! I don’t care if it’s cliche. I shall hold my hand over my heart, cry one round, salty tear, and toast life with a cold one. Adieu.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    I read Tom Robbins decades ago for the madcap humor, the quips, the absurdity. The sheer wacky invention. B is for Beer has much less of all that—well, it is short, so it has less of everything, I guess—than I might have liked. I read that it was written as a kind of challenge—betcha can’t write a book about beer for children!--and it really isn’t. It’s a book for the Robbins fan club, grandpas and grandmas, most of them imagining reading it to their grandkids, maybe, but they really wouldn’t. I I read Tom Robbins decades ago for the madcap humor, the quips, the absurdity. The sheer wacky invention. B is for Beer has much less of all that—well, it is short, so it has less of everything, I guess—than I might have liked. I read that it was written as a kind of challenge—betcha can’t write a book about beer for children!--and it really isn’t. It’s a book for the Robbins fan club, grandpas and grandmas, most of them imagining reading it to their grandkids, maybe, but they really wouldn’t. It’s written with the help of Google, I am guessing, a series of lighthearted lectures about the history and making of beer filled with oodles of factoids. "No, pumpkin, beer isn't extracted from grasshoppers. Nor hop toads, either. A hop is some funky vegetable that even vegans won't eat. Farmers dry the flowers of this plant and call them 'hops.' I should mention that only the female hop plants are used in making beer, which may be why men are so attracted to it. It's a mating instinct." Okay, that’s pretty good, for a way for framing information, and I did laugh a couple times, but you can already tell I wanted to like it more than I did. It’s kind of a “children’s book for adults” in that it is narrated by Gracie. 6 year old Gracie has an indifferent mommy, a grumpy daddy, a kind of hip philosopher Uncle Moe; at one point she drinks a whole can of beer, gets sick and meets a beer fairy who tells her the same kind of things about beer her uncle did. And stuff about Costa Rica—which has no military!—to which said uncle moves. This gives you a glimpse into Robbins’ wit: “As you are surely aware, our planet is turning on its axis around and around in space. It turns slowly, however, making one complete rotation only every twenty-four hours; and that's a good thing -- isn't it? -- because if our world turned as fast as Gracie's room appeared to be turning, the sun would be either rising or setting every fifteen minutes, astronomers would be as woozy as rodeo clowns, and it'd be nearly impossible to keep our meatballs from rolling out of our spaghetti.” Not bad. So Robbins can still write, and amusingly, but most of this book is just information that will lead home brewers to own the book. But a bit sluggish, on the thicker side of stout. Bogs down, I mean. And after a series of infomercials from both Gracie’s uncle AND the beer fairy, I didn’t need sappy kid lectures about the difference between courage and liquid courage: "Courage is where you find it. Bravery that comes from a bottle-- or from book or from a sermon-- lacks the full strength and purity of bravery that comes straight from the heart." Or the warnings about liver damage and so on. I know this stuff. I have a liver. This is supposed to be a funny book, Tom. Okay, I did like this one, though: “The world is a wonderfully weird place, consensual reality is significantly flawed, no institution can be trusted, certainty is a mirage, security a delusion, and the tyranny of the dull mind forever threatens — but our lives are not as limited as we think they are, all things are possible, laughter is holier than piety, freedom is sweeter than fame, and in the end it’s love and love alone that really matters.” I listened to it, a couple hours time, and it was worth a few smiles. But if you have never read Robbins, start with Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, Another Roadside Attraction or Still Life With Woodpecker.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    I'd forgotten how much I love Tom Robbins. His quirky sense of humor is as refreshing as a cold ...Diet Coke --sorry, I'm not a beer drinker :) But the book is funny--and insightful. There are some great quotes here. Some of my favorites: "You know what the game of golf is, don't you? It's basketball for people who can't jump and chess for people who can't think." "Every time a person goes to the mall, she loses a little piece of her soul." There's a warning from the Beer Fairy to Gracie: "When cons I'd forgotten how much I love Tom Robbins. His quirky sense of humor is as refreshing as a cold ...Diet Coke --sorry, I'm not a beer drinker :) But the book is funny--and insightful. There are some great quotes here. Some of my favorites: "You know what the game of golf is, don't you? It's basketball for people who can't jump and chess for people who can't think." "Every time a person goes to the mall, she loses a little piece of her soul." There's a warning from the Beer Fairy to Gracie: "When considering beer as a vehicle, one had better bear in mind that it's hardly reliable transportation. It's a very old cart, in fact; a wagon pushed and pulled by forgotten forces, by agricultural spirits, the ancient spirits of grain and the land. It's a wagon, my dear, that can easily swerve and run off the road." And a little philosophy, as well: "...It's a vehicle, a neutral, unattached object, kind of like a knife that can be used for peeling turnips in an orphanage or for slicing off a man's ears. Many things in life are like that, including, and perhaps most especially, people's political and religious beliefs--but that's a subject for a much later day. What you need to remember now is that matters are very seldom all black or all white. They can even be both at the same time." "And did they live happily ever after? No, nobody ever does--at least not totally. But whenever Karla was blindsided by bad days, as most of us are from time to time, she'd make a point of refusing to take them too seriously, and that, dear reader, is the next best thing to everlasting happiness."

  4. 5 out of 5

    foteini_dl

    The main characters fo this book are a 6-year old girl,her uncle and a fairy and...beer!Well,that's quite something. Tom Robbins has a quirk sense of humor and in a point or two in the beginning there are Woody Allen-esque influences. His use of language is really good,too (not exceptional,but really good).Plus,he is an excellent storyteller and could easily write children's stories. A light,readable and funny book is what you need when it's 40 degrees out there. And -some kind of-magic.And accord The main characters fo this book are a 6-year old girl,her uncle and a fairy and...beer!Well,that's quite something. Tom Robbins has a quirk sense of humor and in a point or two in the beginning there are Woody Allen-esque influences. His use of language is really good,too (not exceptional,but really good).Plus,he is an excellent storyteller and could easily write children's stories. A light,readable and funny book is what you need when it's 40 degrees out there. And -some kind of-magic.And according to Robbins,beer.Personally,I will pass on the beer thing-not a fan myself.But it would be a blast if he wrote a book named "W for Whiskey" or something like that.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette (GR isn't sending comment notifications)

    D is for Dumb, Desperate, and Disappointing Drivel! You know a book is really bad when it's only 125 pages long and you can't even get halfway through it. I gave this one a whirl just to see what ol' Tom Robbins had been doing this past couple of years. Now I know. D is for Drinking too much beer. And it's also for Dead brain cells, of which you will need a lot if you hope to enjoy this pile of Dung. D is for Dumb, Desperate, and Disappointing Drivel! You know a book is really bad when it's only 125 pages long and you can't even get halfway through it. I gave this one a whirl just to see what ol' Tom Robbins had been doing this past couple of years. Now I know. D is for Drinking too much beer. And it's also for Dead brain cells, of which you will need a lot if you hope to enjoy this pile of Dung.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nick Iuppa

    Not sure this is a book for beer loving grandfathers to read to their young granddaughters, an infomercial for the brewing industry, or a cautionary for newly arriving AA members, or maybe all of the above. But it sure has it's funny moments... just not enough of them. BTW, the audiobook is really well done, and the narrator does a great job of speaking for a little girl, the beer fairy and the entire brewing industry. Not sure this is a book for beer loving grandfathers to read to their young granddaughters, an infomercial for the brewing industry, or a cautionary for newly arriving AA members, or maybe all of the above. But it sure has it's funny moments... just not enough of them. BTW, the audiobook is really well done, and the narrator does a great job of speaking for a little girl, the beer fairy and the entire brewing industry.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    This was a lighthearted treatise on the subject of beer, somehow told through the eyes of a 6 year-old. I laughed and learned quite a bit, and would recommend as a nice palate cleanser between novels.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Tom Robbins is still a genius!!! The only problem with this book is in keeping with the statement on the cover (A children's book for grown-ups, a grown up book for children) it is far too short. On the satisfaction meter though, it is right up there with a cold brew on a hot afternoon, after all the chores are done. Just sit back and say "Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh" If you haven't already bought it, and even if you have, Powells is offering signed editions, and since it is unlikely Tom is going to tour f Tom Robbins is still a genius!!! The only problem with this book is in keeping with the statement on the cover (A children's book for grown-ups, a grown up book for children) it is far too short. On the satisfaction meter though, it is right up there with a cold brew on a hot afternoon, after all the chores are done. Just sit back and say "Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh" If you haven't already bought it, and even if you have, Powells is offering signed editions, and since it is unlikely Tom is going to tour far, you might order today! I did!!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Vanderesch

    B is for Beer is a fairy tale about beer, two things I have great fondness for. I love the idea of fairies and magic and happily ever afters. I also love beer. That said, this book was a win-win for this reader. Yes, the humor is a forced clever in a Lake Wobegon, NPR sort of way, but that shouldn't be an issue if you are choosing to read a book called B is for Beer whose main characters are a 6 year old girl, her philosopher uncle and the Beer Fairy. B is for Beer is a fairy tale about beer, two things I have great fondness for. I love the idea of fairies and magic and happily ever afters. I also love beer. That said, this book was a win-win for this reader. Yes, the humor is a forced clever in a Lake Wobegon, NPR sort of way, but that shouldn't be an issue if you are choosing to read a book called B is for Beer whose main characters are a 6 year old girl, her philosopher uncle and the Beer Fairy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Angie Boyter

    Early report: By page 2 I was laughing hysterically but not at all sure I would say this is a one I would give to young kids! It continued to be a lot of fun and VERY much what I would expect from Tom Robbins, but I still am not sure if it is a book for kids. In particular, he expressed some of his philosophical points in terms that I THINK are not simple enough for kids in vocabulary and expression. But I am not very kid-savvy and would welcome input from those who are.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Caryn

    It was a cute quick read. Not amazing, but not a bad way to pass the time.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karen Robinson

    Tightrope walking juvenile fiction/adult fiction, an interesting task to give oneself but Tom Robbins is so much better unleashed! Full credit for this attempt, it spoke openly and respectfully to youngsters while maintaining boundaries.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Juanita

    Review: B Is For Beer by Tom Robbins. Tom’s creativity creates a book about beer for children and adults. When I started the book I thought he did a wonderful job using a pixie to describe how beer was made to a six-year-old girl named Gracie Perkel. The subject was an educational lesson about how beer was made. Even as an adult I was getting a lesson of history myself. I never knew that the making of beer started centuries ago in Egypt. Robbins also used humor throughout the story which made me Review: B Is For Beer by Tom Robbins. Tom’s creativity creates a book about beer for children and adults. When I started the book I thought he did a wonderful job using a pixie to describe how beer was made to a six-year-old girl named Gracie Perkel. The subject was an educational lesson about how beer was made. Even as an adult I was getting a lesson of history myself. I never knew that the making of beer started centuries ago in Egypt. Robbins also used humor throughout the story which made me chuckle a few times. Grace’s inquisitive mind wanted to know why daddy and uncle Moe like to drink beer. She brought the subject up to her mother and her mother said, “Go ask your daddy”. Gracie decided to do one better then that, she asked daddy for a sip of beer while he and uncle Moe were watching a game on the television. Of course the answer was “NO”, beer is for adults. However, dear cunning uncle Moe lets her have a sip behind daddy’s back. “Yuck”, she said to uncle Moe, it had a nasty bitter taste to her. Then he started to explaining information about the history of beer, and the process in making beer. A lot of what he said was in one ear and out the other for Gracie, she was still thinking of the bitter taste. Gracie’s birthday was coming up so uncle Moe promised to bring her to a brewery so she could see the process and understand it better. Uncle Moe thought he would tell her parents they were going somewhere else. So Gracie had a secret and couldn’t wait to go with uncle Moe. Gracie also wanted a pink cell phone and her mother was doing all she could to find one and wasn’t having any luck in that area…Plus, uncle Moe hurt his foot and had to tell Gracie that their secret trip was off. Then Gracie found out her daddy wouldn’t be around for her birthday because of a serious meeting out of town for his work….Oh yea! Gracie was not dumb…“Why was his secretary going with him”? She also had a party planned but now a bunch of kids in her class had the flu virus and now the party was squashed…Everything Gracie wanted wasn’t going to happen and she was very disappointed. She took a can of beer from the refrigerator and smashed it on top of her birthday cake….She returned to the refrigerator and took a beer out, opened it and guzzled it down so fast so she wouldn’t taste the bitterness. It didn’t take long before Gracie got sick from the beer and vomited on her bedroom carpet. That’s when the room started spinning and she started slurring her words. Gracie made it to her bed and slowly she past out. However, Gracie thought she was fine because the Beer Fairy was with her and she took her on an educational tour through the process of making beer but also educating her what the pros and cons were when people drank….Up to this point in the book I thought it was a great book but after the adventure with the Beer Fairy Tom Robbins added other issues as, adult bickering, divorce, relationships, along with dysfunctional family problems. He was sending Gracie down a number of paths that I really didn’t care for. He should have stopped with the Beer Fairy. I don’t think it was the right time to introduce other unrelated messy subjects for a child without having the time to deal and explained those issues more in depth then twenty five pages. Tom Robbins should have stayed with Gracie’s Beer curiosity…..

  14. 4 out of 5

    Snotchocheez

    What is up with my favorite humorist authors trying their hand at "SOMETHING NEW" ??? I attribute my love of reading today to Tom Robbins' ascerbic wit in the 80s and 90s, evidenced with terrific novels like "Still Life With Woodpecker", "Even Cowgirls Get The Blues", "Jitterbug Perfume", "Skinny Legs and All", et.al. All of his novels have been irreverent, off-kilter, thought-provoking laugh-fests (for me, anyway). Mr. Robbins has never been a prolific writer, but about every four or What is up with my favorite humorist authors trying their hand at "SOMETHING NEW" ??? I attribute my love of reading today to Tom Robbins' ascerbic wit in the 80s and 90s, evidenced with terrific novels like "Still Life With Woodpecker", "Even Cowgirls Get The Blues", "Jitterbug Perfume", "Skinny Legs and All", et.al. All of his novels have been irreverent, off-kilter, thought-provoking laugh-fests (for me, anyway). Mr. Robbins has never been a prolific writer, but about every four or five years he could be counted on to churn out a pretty interesting little gem. I'm guessing though that it's been eight years since he's graced us with a novel, he's either got the worst writer's block ever, or he's cranking out one hell of a masterpiece to round out his career. "Villa Incognito" came out in 2003; to bankroll his writer's block (or pending masterpiece), it seems like he had to wheel out some high concept/low brow schlock (with the Robbins' imprimatur and cachet his former works have carried with him) (though probably written as a joke a long time ago, then buried in a vault somewhere underneath myriad screenplay drafts of "...Cowgirls")... To whit, 2009 begat "B is for Beer", a pseudo-kids book about, um, er, uh...Beer. While I cannot dismiss it outright (there are a few kernels of genuine Robbins Whimsy sprinkled through out its' 125 less-than-generous pages (including illustrations)), it largely fails as a children's book (either as a book to read by kids or as a book read TO kids). The plot (such that it is) revolves around 5-year-old-soon-to-be-six Gracie Perkel's frustrations upon her birthday when her father a little too conveniently slips out of town on a business trip AND her jocose booze hound Uncle Moe (who'd promised her on the sly to tour the Beer Factory in town for her birthday) moves on a whim to Costa Rica. Saddened, she drinks down two of Uncle Moe's surplus refrigerated beers in quick succession, chucks up her birthday cake, gets the spins, is visited by the Beer Fairy, who takes her through "THE SEAM" (mmmm-kay....) and shows her everything she'd ever want to know about the beverage she'd shown a keen interest in. Blah Blah Blah zzzzzzzzz.... With a nudge and wink (to show his faithful readers that his tongue is firmly in cheek) he basically implies his even-handed treatment of the subject of beer is just a cautionary tale for adults (with a thin, somewhat lame children's book veneer). The whole time I was reading this little barley-and-hops fluff I'm thinking "what's the point"? Then...a feeling of extreme deja vu hit me...this was the exact feeling I got whilst reading superb satirist/essayist of the '00s David Sedaris' anthropomorphized high-concept/low brow menagerie mumbo-jumbo "Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk": while not directed at kids, it was illustrated by a renowned children's book illustrator, and its' messages conveyed in its' rather grotesque stories were largely lost upon me, again thinking "what's the point"? Mssrs. Robbins and Sedaris, a humble plea: stop schtupping for a paycheck and stick with the stuff that made you successful to begin with (and endeared this loyal fan to your work). Please??

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read that Tom Robbins wrote this book on a dare because someone said it was impossible to write a children's book about beer. To which I say, there is a time to accept a dare and a time to pass. This should have been a time to pass. This is structured completely as a children's chapter book, with a 5 year old girl as the protagonist. It starts off as a very tongue-in-cheek story of a little girl's curiosity about the beer her daddy so enjoys. Soon though, the kid is chugging a can of beer, sma I read that Tom Robbins wrote this book on a dare because someone said it was impossible to write a children's book about beer. To which I say, there is a time to accept a dare and a time to pass. This should have been a time to pass. This is structured completely as a children's chapter book, with a 5 year old girl as the protagonist. It starts off as a very tongue-in-cheek story of a little girl's curiosity about the beer her daddy so enjoys. Soon though, the kid is chugging a can of beer, smashing her birthday cake, bouncing on the bed, upchucking, then going off on interworldly adventures with the beer fairy to learn all about the history of beer and how it is made. This part was interesting and at times funny. Robbins should have left it at the point where they return and the fairy makes her promise never to drink again until she is at least 18. Then it would have been a weird, but clever little fairy story with the requisite moral. Instead, it's like in the last 20 pages of the book he suddenly said "and now for something completely different!" and launched into some broken-marriage/struggling-single-mom/run-away-to-Costa-Rica-and-live-on-the-beach-with-Uncle-Moe hokum that left me asking WHAT?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mike Clinton

    From Amazon.com "Yes, believe it or not--but B Is for Beer is also a book for adults, and bear in mind that it's the work of maverick bestselling novelist Tom Robbins, internationally known for his ability to both seriously illuminate and comically entertain. Once upon a time (right about now) there was a planet (how about this one?) whose inhabitants consumed thirty-six billion gallons of beer each year (it's a fact, you can Google it). Among those affected, each in his or her own way, by all th From Amazon.com "Yes, believe it or not--but B Is for Beer is also a book for adults, and bear in mind that it's the work of maverick bestselling novelist Tom Robbins, internationally known for his ability to both seriously illuminate and comically entertain. Once upon a time (right about now) there was a planet (how about this one?) whose inhabitants consumed thirty-six billion gallons of beer each year (it's a fact, you can Google it). Among those affected, each in his or her own way, by all the bubbles, burps, and foam, was a smart, wide-eyed, adventurous kindergartner named Gracie; her distracted mommy; her insensitive dad; her non-conformist uncle; and a magical, butt-kicking intruder from a world within our world. Populated by the aforementioned characters--and as charming as it may be subversive--B Is for Beer involves readers, young and old, in a surprising, far-reaching investigation into the limits of reality, the transformative powers of children, and, of course, the ultimate meaning of a tall, cold brewski."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I went to see Tom Robbins read from his new children's book B Is for Beer last night and it was pretty hilarious. He saw a cartoon with a publisher and writer in a bar, and the publisher says something to the writer along the lines of, "No, I don't think a children's book about beer would sell." Robbins saw it as a brilliant challenge, and the resulting book is in children's book form but is definitely for adults - aside from all of the rhapsodizing about beer, a 5-year-old gets drunk and later I went to see Tom Robbins read from his new children's book B Is for Beer last night and it was pretty hilarious. He saw a cartoon with a publisher and writer in a bar, and the publisher says something to the writer along the lines of, "No, I don't think a children's book about beer would sell." Robbins saw it as a brilliant challenge, and the resulting book is in children's book form but is definitely for adults - aside from all of the rhapsodizing about beer, a 5-year-old gets drunk and later has to kick a would-be rapist in the balls during a visit from the Beer Fairy. (Now there's a great idea!) Parts of it read like a primer on how to brew beer. But still, if you love Robbins and love beer, this has to be in your collection.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    Robbins uses some of the most muscular and flexible language I've ever read. His sentences are so finely crafted that each gleams. His skewed vision combined with his rarefied prose can make it difficult to notice when there's something missing. It's my opinion that as beautiful as this book is, it's also pedantic at its core. In a boring way. Also, the spacing of the prose reminds me of term papers which needed to be exactly 40 pages long. It is worth reading for the joyful, playful, ebullient goofi Robbins uses some of the most muscular and flexible language I've ever read. His sentences are so finely crafted that each gleams. His skewed vision combined with his rarefied prose can make it difficult to notice when there's something missing. It's my opinion that as beautiful as this book is, it's also pedantic at its core. In a boring way. Also, the spacing of the prose reminds me of term papers which needed to be exactly 40 pages long. It is worth reading for the joyful, playful, ebullient goofiness that defines Robbins. There are some hilarious passages, of course, and some memorable lines. Ultimately, for me, it wasn't a keeper, though I'm glad I read it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    The idea of beer appeals to my inner blue-collar worker self. The reality of it makes me wrinkle my nose and stick out my tongue in a remarkable impression of the Mr. Yuk sticker. Nope, not a fan of beer, and not a fan of this book, with the exception of the parting speech the beer fairy gives Gracie, which should immediately be incorporated into every graduation ceremony address delivered in the U.S. I'm told by fans of Robbins that I need to go read something else of his. Something with less be The idea of beer appeals to my inner blue-collar worker self. The reality of it makes me wrinkle my nose and stick out my tongue in a remarkable impression of the Mr. Yuk sticker. Nope, not a fan of beer, and not a fan of this book, with the exception of the parting speech the beer fairy gives Gracie, which should immediately be incorporated into every graduation ceremony address delivered in the U.S. I'm told by fans of Robbins that I need to go read something else of his. Something with less beer and more cheer.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jade

    A very weird tale between a young child's intrigue at beer and the impact of this substance in her life. There is also a very weird middle bit with the beer fairy (yes the beer fairy!) explaining how beer is made. A sweet quick read, but a book with no depth, no real storyline and given it's randomness, just a bit weird. The supposed humour of the book doesn't even exist and Gracie is strangely the most advanced 6 year old I've ever heard of in my life. If you're stuck in a waiting room with 30 mi A very weird tale between a young child's intrigue at beer and the impact of this substance in her life. There is also a very weird middle bit with the beer fairy (yes the beer fairy!) explaining how beer is made. A sweet quick read, but a book with no depth, no real storyline and given it's randomness, just a bit weird. The supposed humour of the book doesn't even exist and Gracie is strangely the most advanced 6 year old I've ever heard of in my life. If you're stuck in a waiting room with 30 mins to spare give it a go, if not I really wouldn't bother.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    It would have been hard for me to not love this book. Tom Robbins? Check. Beer? Check. A protagonist just like my daughter? Check. So there you have it, I loved it. Robbins' ode to the wonder of beer through the eyes of a five/six-year-old girl won me over from page one. Throw in hilarious characters like the Beer Fairy and Uncle Moe, and I think you just might like it too. And even if you don't, it'll only eat up at most a couple of hours of your time. It would have been hard for me to not love this book. Tom Robbins? Check. Beer? Check. A protagonist just like my daughter? Check. So there you have it, I loved it. Robbins' ode to the wonder of beer through the eyes of a five/six-year-old girl won me over from page one. Throw in hilarious characters like the Beer Fairy and Uncle Moe, and I think you just might like it too. And even if you don't, it'll only eat up at most a couple of hours of your time.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Clare

    I'm not sure quasi-children's books are the best outlet for Tom Robbins' writing style. More often than not, his linguistic acrobatics and wink-wink-nudge-nudge jokes were distracting and annoying rather than humorous. Not to mention they didn't really do much to jazz up the frankly quite boring process of making beer. I'd rather learn the facts on a standard-issue brewery tour—at least they give you free beer at the end. I'm not sure quasi-children's books are the best outlet for Tom Robbins' writing style. More often than not, his linguistic acrobatics and wink-wink-nudge-nudge jokes were distracting and annoying rather than humorous. Not to mention they didn't really do much to jazz up the frankly quite boring process of making beer. I'd rather learn the facts on a standard-issue brewery tour—at least they give you free beer at the end.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Ann

    D Is For DUMB: Prior to reading this book I had never read anything written by him. After reading this book, I doubt I will read anything more written by him. Funny? No. Amusing? Slightly. A little girl who is intrigued by beer, accidentally gets drunk on the 6th birthday & pukes on her Hello Kitty rug.... In a drunker stupor she is visited by the Beer fairy who takes her on a tour of how beer is made, from the Barley fields to the brewery, to a Beer Festival. Meh!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Ughgh, I thought this book was very lame. Maybe I would have liked it a tiny bit more if I had read it rather than listened to the audiobook, but I doubt it. S is for Stupid.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael Seidlinger

    I like beer. Can't say the same about this book. I like beer. Can't say the same about this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mountbatten

    víla PIVOňka :-))))

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Had difficulty rereading his earlier books, but enjoyed this one. Bob, this one's for you! :) Had difficulty rereading his earlier books, but enjoyed this one. Bob, this one's for you! :)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erin Britton

    Apparently, B Is for Beer got its start in life from a bet. Not an actual bet per se, but rather a bet featured in a cartoon featured in a newspaper that featured in Tom Robbins’ reading pile. The cartoon involved a publisher and a writer walking into a bar with the publisher remarking, “No, I don’t think a children’s book about beer would sell.” Robbins took this to be a challenge and so began to write B Is for Beer, his first book in six years. A fable about beer aimed at both children and adu Apparently, B Is for Beer got its start in life from a bet. Not an actual bet per se, but rather a bet featured in a cartoon featured in a newspaper that featured in Tom Robbins’ reading pile. The cartoon involved a publisher and a writer walking into a bar with the publisher remarking, “No, I don’t think a children’s book about beer would sell.” Robbins took this to be a challenge and so began to write B Is for Beer, his first book in six years. A fable about beer aimed at both children and adults that began as a whimsical gamble might not sound particularly promising, but in the hands of Tom Robbins it’s an idea just crazy enough to work. B Is for Beer might be a small novel in terms of pages, but it features Robbins’ typically large scope in a story that explores the fantastical nature of seemingly mundane affairs: "Once upon a time (right about now) there was a planet (how about this one?) whose inhabitants consumed thirty-six billion gallons of beer each year (it’s a fact, you can Google it). Among those affected, each in his or her own way, by all the bubbles, burps, and foam, was a smart, wide-eyed, adventurous kindergartner named Gracie; her distracted mommy; her insensitive dad; her non-conformist uncle; and a magical, butt-kicking intruder from a world within our world." Gracie Perkel is a precocious young girl beset with disappointments. Much to the consternation of her halitosis-riddled Sunday school teacher, as her sixth birthday draws near, Gracie is becoming increasingly intrigued by beer and its pedigree (both historically and mythically speaking). In her quest for learning, Gracie had persuaded her Uncle Moe, a philosopher and well-travelled beer connoisseur, to take her on a tour of the Redhook brewery for her birthday. Unfortunately, although Uncle Moe was a reliable source of wisdom (particular gems include “You know what the game of golf is, don’t you? It’s basketball for people who can’t jump and chess for people who can’t think.” and “Every time a person goes to the mall, she loses a little piece of her soul.”), he certainly couldn’t be relied upon to keep promises. When the day of young Gracie’s birthday dawn, Uncle Moe was unable to take her on the promised brewery tour as he had made the unavoidable decision to run away to Costa Rica with a podiatrist named Madeline Proust. Gracie’s birthday then went from bad to worse. Her father was inconveniently detained in Tuscon (Gracie knew he was on a business trip “because otherwise why would he have taken his secretary along?”) and so couldn’t make it back for the big day. Even more inconveniently, he had forgotten exactly which pet shop he had reserved Gracie’s much longed for new puppy at and so the new arrival wouldn’t be arriving for another week at least. The pink mobile phone that Gracie had been hoping for failed to materialise as well. With her mother out of the house gossiping with a neighbour, Gracie decided to ditch her birthday cake and enjoy a nice, cold can of beer instead. Hilarious consequences ensue. As Gracie dances around her bedroom, vomiting up cake as she does so, the Beer Fairy appears to her and takes her on a magical trip though The Seam between realities to learn more about the wonderful concoction that is beer. B Is for Beer is a funny thing. It really is aptly described as “A Children’s Book for Grownups and A Grown-up Book for Children.” The humour in the novel stems from Robbins’ exquisite use of language and the wonderful characters he creates (apparently, all humans are “free-flowing meat waves of possibility”), but there are several unexpectedly dark occurrences that alter the mood quite dramatically. Luckily, this mix of the absurd and the serious works very well in practice. B Is for Beer also proved to be far more of a technical brewer’s manual than I was expecting. I’ve never attempted a home brew before, but I now feel reasonably competent to do so and may well brew up a batch of Jitterbugging Woodpecker in honour of Mister Robbins. Technical details aside, B Is for Beer is a fabulously whimsical fable about life, love and beer that never takes itself too seriously nor fails to entertain. While B Is for Beer certainly couldn’t be described as Robbins’ greatest work, nor is it the place to start if you are new to his books, it is a wholly original and rather brave story that succeeds in both raising a chuckle and making you ponder just what beer mug philosophers might really know.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paul Harmon

    Some of my favorite things in the world begin with B. Bourbon, Books, and Boooo.... Ummm nevermind, and Yes Beer. Tom Robbins acclaimed author of "Even Cowgirls Get The Blues" Makes an attempt to write a book talking all about beer from its Brewing to its place in society and everything in between. Its marketed with the gimmicky idea of it being a children's book for adults based on the fact that its told from the POV of a 5/6 year old girl. and boy does it fail. At its best its uninspiring, at Some of my favorite things in the world begin with B. Bourbon, Books, and Boooo.... Ummm nevermind, and Yes Beer. Tom Robbins acclaimed author of "Even Cowgirls Get The Blues" Makes an attempt to write a book talking all about beer from its Brewing to its place in society and everything in between. Its marketed with the gimmicky idea of it being a children's book for adults based on the fact that its told from the POV of a 5/6 year old girl. and boy does it fail. At its best its uninspiring, at its worst its downright creepy. A drunk 6 year old child puking and talking to beer fairies hardly inspires whimsy in me. There are references to grandparents reading this to their young charges. 1 OMG that is not gonna happen 2 no kid would sit still long enough to get through this adult length book about beer. Even if it is a joke It just doesn't land. Im sorry but this is just bad. If you can make beer boring and make me feel bad for drinking it then the book has problems. Do Not Recommend...though points for a bit at the that points out that Conservatives are money grubbing failures of politics.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I love Tom Robbins, but this short book doesn't really add much to his oeuvre other than to underline the fact that we're unlikely to get another full-length novel from him any time soon. It's pitched peculiarly on the child/adult divide - pitched almost to the mindset of a human who has yet to actually evolve - and because of that it's entertaining but slight; the motivation for telling this particular story unclear. Having now come to the end of all of Robbins' written work, it has stimulated I love Tom Robbins, but this short book doesn't really add much to his oeuvre other than to underline the fact that we're unlikely to get another full-length novel from him any time soon. It's pitched peculiarly on the child/adult divide - pitched almost to the mindset of a human who has yet to actually evolve - and because of that it's entertaining but slight; the motivation for telling this particular story unclear. Having now come to the end of all of Robbins' written work, it has stimulated a desire to re-read the novels, and therefore as a palate cleanser, a teaser, perhaps it's achieved its goal. If you've never read Robbins before, it would make no sense to start here. A book for the converted, I feel.

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