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The Word Made Strange: Theology, Language and Culture

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The essays in this new book from John Milbank range over the entire field of theology, and both extend and enrich the theological perspective underlying his earlier Theology and Social Theory. The essays are focused around the theme of a theological approach to language, and offer a richly textured and broad ranging inquiry which will contribute to a variety of contemporar The essays in this new book from John Milbank range over the entire field of theology, and both extend and enrich the theological perspective underlying his earlier Theology and Social Theory. The essays are focused around the theme of a theological approach to language, and offer a richly textured and broad ranging inquiry which will contribute to a variety of contemporary debates.


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The essays in this new book from John Milbank range over the entire field of theology, and both extend and enrich the theological perspective underlying his earlier Theology and Social Theory. The essays are focused around the theme of a theological approach to language, and offer a richly textured and broad ranging inquiry which will contribute to a variety of contemporar The essays in this new book from John Milbank range over the entire field of theology, and both extend and enrich the theological perspective underlying his earlier Theology and Social Theory. The essays are focused around the theme of a theological approach to language, and offer a richly textured and broad ranging inquiry which will contribute to a variety of contemporary debates.

30 review for The Word Made Strange: Theology, Language and Culture

  1. 5 out of 5

    Freddie Murfin

    A wonderful, fascinating read that got me through the first few weeks of the Coronavirus pandemic. There are of course many writers being discussed here (Herder, Hamann, Vico, Gregory of Nyssa, etc.) as is expected in a work by someone like Milbank, yet I think the two most important figures he engages with - are Aquinas and Hegel. It's probably best to at least have some background, understanding of these two prior to engaging with his work as the book is mostly a reworking/reinterpretation of A wonderful, fascinating read that got me through the first few weeks of the Coronavirus pandemic. There are of course many writers being discussed here (Herder, Hamann, Vico, Gregory of Nyssa, etc.) as is expected in a work by someone like Milbank, yet I think the two most important figures he engages with - are Aquinas and Hegel. It's probably best to at least have some background, understanding of these two prior to engaging with his work as the book is mostly a reworking/reinterpretation of their ideas. I'll leave a brief summary below, as a taster. For Milbank, poesis is ‘the ceaseless re-narrating and ‘explaining’ of human history under the sign of the cross […] as an utterly concrete allegorical outline, which remains, precisely by that token, all the more a mere sign of that mystery into which it must still enter in order to define itself.’ What appears here is a redemptive re-narration, a socially embodied poesis, and the ‘tragic abyss’ that is ‘represented rather than mutely indicated […] in its historical occasion and final non-necessity, [with] the obscurity of its opening [being] yet bounded and enabled by the concrete instance of a ‘ruin.’’ ‘A historicist theology knows that the whole thing […] is the product of our representation, and it is the whole picture which must be […] an imperfect registration of [a] final reality.’

  2. 4 out of 5

    David Mosley

    An excellent collection of essays that have certainly made this reader think and even rethink some things.

  3. 5 out of 5

    James

    See my review of the Smith book. Surely interesting but impossibly dense, to me at least.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Goetz

    Just re-read the programmatic essay, "The Name of Jesus," and found it irritating and insightful at the same time. Definitely worth reading, though. Just re-read the programmatic essay, "The Name of Jesus," and found it irritating and insightful at the same time. Definitely worth reading, though.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joel Cade

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  9. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Boyle

  11. 4 out of 5

    Omid

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mikael Tindefors

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mpole Masemola

  14. 5 out of 5

    [辟邪]

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Mattebo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Turnage

  19. 4 out of 5

    Roland Clark

  20. 5 out of 5

    Doug

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Hinkley

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jack Pappas

  23. 4 out of 5

    Troy Hammond

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul Cannon

  25. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Woods

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tristin Hassell

  27. 4 out of 5

    Levi Jaco

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Murphy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gary Conway

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ragnar Mogård

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