web site hit counter Adventures of Eovaai, Princess of Ijaveo. a Pre-Adamitical History. Interspersed with a Great Number of Remarkable Occurrences, ... Written Originally in the Language of Nature, ... and Now Retranslated Into English, by the Son of a Mandarin, ... - Ebooks PDF Online
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Adventures of Eovaai, Princess of Ijaveo. a Pre-Adamitical History. Interspersed with a Great Number of Remarkable Occurrences, ... Written Originally in the Language of Nature, ... and Now Retranslated Into English, by the Son of a Mandarin, ...

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The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now fo The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now for the first time these high-quality digital copies of original 18th century manuscripts are available in print, making them highly accessible to libraries, undergraduate students, and independent scholars.Western literary study flows out of eighteenth-century works by Alexander Pope, Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Frances Burney, Denis Diderot, Johann Gottfried Herder, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and others. Experience the birth of the modern novel, or compare the development of language using dictionaries and grammar discourses. ++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: ++++British LibraryT057423Anonymous. By Eliza Haywood.London: printed for S. Baker, 1736. xv, [1],224p.; 12


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The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now fo The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now for the first time these high-quality digital copies of original 18th century manuscripts are available in print, making them highly accessible to libraries, undergraduate students, and independent scholars.Western literary study flows out of eighteenth-century works by Alexander Pope, Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Frances Burney, Denis Diderot, Johann Gottfried Herder, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and others. Experience the birth of the modern novel, or compare the development of language using dictionaries and grammar discourses. ++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: ++++British LibraryT057423Anonymous. By Eliza Haywood.London: printed for S. Baker, 1736. xv, [1],224p.; 12

30 review for Adventures of Eovaai, Princess of Ijaveo. a Pre-Adamitical History. Interspersed with a Great Number of Remarkable Occurrences, ... Written Originally in the Language of Nature, ... and Now Retranslated Into English, by the Son of a Mandarin, ...

  1. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    A completely bonkers and brilliantly experimental work of political satire/fantasy fiction first published in 1736. Throw out all your preconceptions of what a novel is supposed to be and to do. Haywood doesn't care about such things. Just let it be the weird and wonderful boundary-smashing thing that it is. It's no wonder that Haywood was one of the great early bestsellers of fiction in English. She recognizes no limits and she's wonderful. A completely bonkers and brilliantly experimental work of political satire/fantasy fiction first published in 1736. Throw out all your preconceptions of what a novel is supposed to be and to do. Haywood doesn't care about such things. Just let it be the weird and wonderful boundary-smashing thing that it is. It's no wonder that Haywood was one of the great early bestsellers of fiction in English. She recognizes no limits and she's wonderful.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Wonderfully weird. If you like postmodern inter/meta-textual fiction with complex framing devices (If on a winter's night a traveler, Pale Fire, etcetera) it might be worth your time to look backwards a little bit to the wildly inventive ways that novelists were developing and innovating on these techniques in the first half of the eighteenth century. And, while a lot of people are at least dimly aware of the purported 'surprising modernism' of works like Clarissa, Eliza Haywood, among many othe Wonderfully weird. If you like postmodern inter/meta-textual fiction with complex framing devices (If on a winter's night a traveler, Pale Fire, etcetera) it might be worth your time to look backwards a little bit to the wildly inventive ways that novelists were developing and innovating on these techniques in the first half of the eighteenth century. And, while a lot of people are at least dimly aware of the purported 'surprising modernism' of works like Clarissa, Eliza Haywood, among many other (mostly female) novelists of the period gets much less attention for her distinctly more peculiar experimentations in these directions. Eovaai is, as the introduction to this or any other edition will tell you, a political satire, with roots in Haywood's Toryist views and her opposition to Prime Minister Walpole. It's okay, though - you don't need to get the political references to appreciate the novel; I certainly didn't, not without reading a bunch of secondary literature afterwards. Eovaai is also presented to us as an abridged, many-times translated history from a lost 'Pre-Adamitic' age, interspersed with the cranky, judgmental comments of the history's most recent translator, a Chinese immigrant living in London (fair warning: there's more than a bit of orientalism throughout). While this premise isn't played out with quite the virtuosic dazzle that someone like Nabokov might bring to it, that's definitely the kind of comparison we should be reaching for when talking about Haywood's layers of meta-textual artifice in this work. It also involves magic jewels, evil magicians, lustful women who are transformed into monkeys, yearning lovers separated by political obligation, and a wise, pure-hearted princess who must return to the throne in order to preserve her kingdom. Who could ask for anything more?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lesya

    H u h Historically interesting but... H U H

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Strange, very strange...I would describe it but you probably wouldn't believe me. Quite entertaining though! Strange, very strange...I would describe it but you probably wouldn't believe me. Quite entertaining though!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stef

    Didn't quite grasp it in college, didn't quite grasp it now. However, I /want/ to like it. I'm really intrigued by the history behind the genre, and how the story interwove into current events. I kinda wish there were quotation marks and more modern formatting though. Didn't quite grasp it in college, didn't quite grasp it now. However, I /want/ to like it. I'm really intrigued by the history behind the genre, and how the story interwove into current events. I kinda wish there were quotation marks and more modern formatting though.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Megan Bruening

    This is more of a warning than a review: when you read this novel make sure you have an edition with good notes. The novel is a satire criticizing the politician Walpole, and without knowledge of the politics of the era the story can be confusing. Also, Haywood was clearly not a master of fantasy, and there is just some bizarre stuff in there.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joelle Oliver

    I like the hidden political meaning behind it. Pretty powerful, but not quite as boring. haha.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marika

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Cook

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Hopkins

  15. 4 out of 5

    Megan Petraska

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Parker

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christopherokeeffe

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ellie Williamson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gena

  24. 4 out of 5

    ZigZagSuck

  25. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brandee

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eileen H

  28. 4 out of 5

    Raquel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Pilkington

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Talbott

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