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Text-Mex: Seductive Hallucinations of the Mexican in America

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A rogues' gallery of Mexican bandits, bombshells, lotharios, and thieves saturates American popular culture. Remember Speedy Gonzalez? "Mexican Spitfire" Lupe Velez? The Frito Bandito? Familiar and reassuring--at least to Anglos--these Mexican stereotypes are not a people but a text, a carefully woven, articulated, and consumer-ready commodity. In this original, provocativ A rogues' gallery of Mexican bandits, bombshells, lotharios, and thieves saturates American popular culture. Remember Speedy Gonzalez? "Mexican Spitfire" Lupe Velez? The Frito Bandito? Familiar and reassuring--at least to Anglos--these Mexican stereotypes are not a people but a text, a carefully woven, articulated, and consumer-ready commodity. In this original, provocative, and highly entertaining book, William Anthony Nericcio deconstructs Tex[t]-Mexicans in films, television, advertising, comic books, toys, literature, and even critical theory, revealing them to be less flesh-and-blood than "seductive hallucinations," less reality than consumer products, a kind of "digital crack." Nericcio engages in close readings of rogue/icons Rita Hayworth, Speedy Gonzalez, Lupe Velez, and Frida Kahlo, as well as Orson Welles' film Touch of Evil and the comic artistry of Gilbert Hernandez. He playfully yet devastatingly discloses how American cultural creators have invented and used these and other Tex[t]-Mexicans since the Mexican Revolution of 1910, thereby exposing the stereotypes, agendas, phobias, and intellectual deceits that drive American popular culture. This sophisticated, innovative history of celebrity Latina/o mannequins in the American marketplace takes a quantum leap toward a constructive and deconstructive next-generation figuration/adoration of Latinos in America.


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A rogues' gallery of Mexican bandits, bombshells, lotharios, and thieves saturates American popular culture. Remember Speedy Gonzalez? "Mexican Spitfire" Lupe Velez? The Frito Bandito? Familiar and reassuring--at least to Anglos--these Mexican stereotypes are not a people but a text, a carefully woven, articulated, and consumer-ready commodity. In this original, provocativ A rogues' gallery of Mexican bandits, bombshells, lotharios, and thieves saturates American popular culture. Remember Speedy Gonzalez? "Mexican Spitfire" Lupe Velez? The Frito Bandito? Familiar and reassuring--at least to Anglos--these Mexican stereotypes are not a people but a text, a carefully woven, articulated, and consumer-ready commodity. In this original, provocative, and highly entertaining book, William Anthony Nericcio deconstructs Tex[t]-Mexicans in films, television, advertising, comic books, toys, literature, and even critical theory, revealing them to be less flesh-and-blood than "seductive hallucinations," less reality than consumer products, a kind of "digital crack." Nericcio engages in close readings of rogue/icons Rita Hayworth, Speedy Gonzalez, Lupe Velez, and Frida Kahlo, as well as Orson Welles' film Touch of Evil and the comic artistry of Gilbert Hernandez. He playfully yet devastatingly discloses how American cultural creators have invented and used these and other Tex[t]-Mexicans since the Mexican Revolution of 1910, thereby exposing the stereotypes, agendas, phobias, and intellectual deceits that drive American popular culture. This sophisticated, innovative history of celebrity Latina/o mannequins in the American marketplace takes a quantum leap toward a constructive and deconstructive next-generation figuration/adoration of Latinos in America.

46 review for Text-Mex: Seductive Hallucinations of the Mexican in America

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zoë

    I especially enjoyed the analysis of Orson Welles' film 'Touch of Evil' in chapter one, and the section on Frida Kahlo and Gilbert Hernandez in chapter five, but there are also many other goodies inbetween. For example, analysis of "Mexican" cartoon characters, and some interesting commentary on the Hollywood starlet Rita Hayworth. I loved the coinage of "XicanOsmosis" to describe the process of influence and cross-dissemination on the Mexican border. Nericcio writes with a wonderfully comic sty I especially enjoyed the analysis of Orson Welles' film 'Touch of Evil' in chapter one, and the section on Frida Kahlo and Gilbert Hernandez in chapter five, but there are also many other goodies inbetween. For example, analysis of "Mexican" cartoon characters, and some interesting commentary on the Hollywood starlet Rita Hayworth. I loved the coinage of "XicanOsmosis" to describe the process of influence and cross-dissemination on the Mexican border. Nericcio writes with a wonderfully comic style too, deflating the pomposity of academic discourse and writing with panache.

  2. 4 out of 5

    John Gutierrez

    My friend wrote this book and i'm quoted, so it's brilliant. My friend wrote this book and i'm quoted, so it's brilliant.

  3. 5 out of 5

    William

    Well of course I like this title! It only took me 16 years to write! ;-0

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mariacarla Sanchez

  5. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bismarck

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

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    Karoline

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    Otto

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    Carrie Andersen

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    Jonny

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    Spring

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    Adam

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    Sarah W

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    Jake Grant

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    Jessica Savalla

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    Seán

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    Rachael Brown

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    Zoid Poterack

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    Jake Maguire

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    Paris

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    Ed Susej

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    Radym

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    LA

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    Johanna

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    Kebo Drew

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    Joy

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    University of Texas Press

  40. 5 out of 5

    Matt

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    Adrianna

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    Victor

  43. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  44. 5 out of 5

    Emma Hernandez

  45. 5 out of 5

    Antonina Clarke

  46. 4 out of 5

    Michael Villasenor

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