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Introduction to Logic

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This well-organized book was designed to introduce students to a way of thinking that encourages precision and accuracy. As the text for a course in modern logic, it familiarizes readers with a complete theory of logical inference and its specific applications to mathematics and the empirical sciences. Part I deals with formal principles of inference and definition, includ This well-organized book was designed to introduce students to a way of thinking that encourages precision and accuracy. As the text for a course in modern logic, it familiarizes readers with a complete theory of logical inference and its specific applications to mathematics and the empirical sciences. Part I deals with formal principles of inference and definition, including a detailed attempt to relate the formal theory of inference to the standard informal proofs common throughout mathematics. An in-depth exploration of elementary intuitive set theory constitutes Part II, with separate chapters on sets, relations, and functions. The final section deals with the set-theoretical foundations of the axiomatic method and contains, in both the discussion and exercises, numerous examples of axiomatically formulated theories. Topics range from the theory of groups and the algebra of the real numbers to elementary probability theory, classical particle mechanics, and the theory of measurement of sensation intensities. Ideally suited for undergraduate courses, this text requires no background in mathematics or philosophy.


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This well-organized book was designed to introduce students to a way of thinking that encourages precision and accuracy. As the text for a course in modern logic, it familiarizes readers with a complete theory of logical inference and its specific applications to mathematics and the empirical sciences. Part I deals with formal principles of inference and definition, includ This well-organized book was designed to introduce students to a way of thinking that encourages precision and accuracy. As the text for a course in modern logic, it familiarizes readers with a complete theory of logical inference and its specific applications to mathematics and the empirical sciences. Part I deals with formal principles of inference and definition, including a detailed attempt to relate the formal theory of inference to the standard informal proofs common throughout mathematics. An in-depth exploration of elementary intuitive set theory constitutes Part II, with separate chapters on sets, relations, and functions. The final section deals with the set-theoretical foundations of the axiomatic method and contains, in both the discussion and exercises, numerous examples of axiomatically formulated theories. Topics range from the theory of groups and the algebra of the real numbers to elementary probability theory, classical particle mechanics, and the theory of measurement of sensation intensities. Ideally suited for undergraduate courses, this text requires no background in mathematics or philosophy.

30 review for Introduction to Logic

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joshua R. Taylor

    I was initially working through this book like a textbook. Reading it carefully and slowly; ensuring that I understood every term and equation; completing exercises and practising. I didn't find it especially fun and eventually I asked myself why I was working through it if I didn't either (a) find it fun or (b) get some benefit from the knowledge. After establishing that (a) wasn't the case, I opted to take a step back and consider how formal logic may be useful to me. After doing an inspectiona I was initially working through this book like a textbook. Reading it carefully and slowly; ensuring that I understood every term and equation; completing exercises and practising. I didn't find it especially fun and eventually I asked myself why I was working through it if I didn't either (a) find it fun or (b) get some benefit from the knowledge. After establishing that (a) wasn't the case, I opted to take a step back and consider how formal logic may be useful to me. After doing an inspectional read, defined in How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading, I came up with this justification for reading: Evaluating arguments and building my own will be helped with logical tools. While persuading employers to take me on or writing essays for my blog, it will help to have logical tools available. The book may have an applicative focus on mathematics and science, but maybe I can see a way to apply it in other ways. Having made this justification I decided to superficially read it cover-to-cover, without any exercises or studying of the equations, to verify the justification. The book turned out to be quite useless to me. The logic provided here is not especially relatable to everyday decision making. It is an axiomatic and formal book, perhaps only somewhat applied by the most hardline of philosophical skeptics. Everybody else reading it must be totally intellectually driven or works themselves as a logicist. Perhaps in specialised circumstances in science or other situations that require complex logical analysis, the work here lies a good foundation. However in my case, as somebody in the software and consulting sector, it provides little use. However, to separate the book from my personal needs, it seems well structured and Suppes writes in an approachable style. He is brief but not to the level of reducing explanations or leaving out examples where they are needed. The book does commit one cardinal sin: no answers to the exercises. If you want to verify the answers, good luck frantically looking on the web or emailing a thousand logic professors!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eric S

    There are several problems with this book so I would not recommend it to someone trying to read a beginning logic book. The first and biggest problem is that for a "textbook for a first course..." there are NO answers to any of the exercises. In my opinion good textbooks, especially for math subjects should have answers in the back for at least one third of the chapter exercises. One ends up working problems with no good idea if one is on the right track unless one searches the internet and find There are several problems with this book so I would not recommend it to someone trying to read a beginning logic book. The first and biggest problem is that for a "textbook for a first course..." there are NO answers to any of the exercises. In my opinion good textbooks, especially for math subjects should have answers in the back for at least one third of the chapter exercises. One ends up working problems with no good idea if one is on the right track unless one searches the internet and finds similar problems. The second problem is style. There seems to be an inconsistency in the author's use of symbolic logic when describing ideas. I found this annoying as I would assume I knew what was described from previous math/logic books only to find out he was talking about something slightly different. The last issue might just be with me. I found the last four chapters to be much clearer than the first eight. This could be because the subject was areas of math which I was more familar with or because by then I was getting used to the writing style. In any case I thought it worth mentioning to someone in case they get discouraged with the early part.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Germancho

  4. 4 out of 5

    Max Tomago

  5. 4 out of 5

    Preston

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sohum Shah

  7. 5 out of 5

    Les Johnson

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anders

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Mavroforas

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ludwig Wittgenstein

  11. 5 out of 5

    M R

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ffortiwn

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alfred Whitehead

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mohammad Asal

  16. 4 out of 5

    Meador

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Germain

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hend Dawood

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andreea Esanu

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  21. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  22. 5 out of 5

    Luke Crawford

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Maurais

  24. 5 out of 5

    T

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  26. 4 out of 5

    Fredrik Allenmark

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tong

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Kam

  29. 5 out of 5

    JOHN-MICHAEL KUCZYNSKI

  30. 5 out of 5

    michael lavin

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