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The Murder of Tutankhamen

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A respected Egyptologist examines the compelling mystery behind the death of King Tutankhamen. Today, Tutankhamen is the most famous of the ancient Egyptian pharaohs. After his death at the age of nineteen, "King Tut" was forgotten from history, until the discovery of his tomb in 1922 propelled him to worldwide fame. But the circumstances of his death remain shrouded in mys A respected Egyptologist examines the compelling mystery behind the death of King Tutankhamen. Today, Tutankhamen is the most famous of the ancient Egyptian pharaohs. After his death at the age of nineteen, "King Tut" was forgotten from history, until the discovery of his tomb in 1922 propelled him to worldwide fame. But the circumstances of his death remain shrouded in mystery.... X-rays of Tutankhamen's skull suggest a violent death. Was it accident or murder? Several members of his family died around the same time--was is coincidence? Why did Tutankhamen's widow send desperate messages to the Hittite king, requesting marriage to one of his sons? And who murdered the Hittite price on his journey to Egypt? Who ordered the removal of Tutankhamen's name from all monuments and temples, and thus from Egyptian history? This fascinating, painstakingly researched book is the first to explore in depth the questionable circumstances of Tutankhamen's demise--and to present a shocking scenario of betrayal, ambition, and murder. In The Murder of Tutankhamen, renowned Egyptologist Bob Brier reveals an exciting journey into ancient history--and a 3,000 year-old mystery that still compels us today. "Brier's 3,000-year-old mystery steadily draws the reader into the curious and exotic world of Egyptology."--The New York Times INCLUDES 16 PAGES OF PHOTOS


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A respected Egyptologist examines the compelling mystery behind the death of King Tutankhamen. Today, Tutankhamen is the most famous of the ancient Egyptian pharaohs. After his death at the age of nineteen, "King Tut" was forgotten from history, until the discovery of his tomb in 1922 propelled him to worldwide fame. But the circumstances of his death remain shrouded in mys A respected Egyptologist examines the compelling mystery behind the death of King Tutankhamen. Today, Tutankhamen is the most famous of the ancient Egyptian pharaohs. After his death at the age of nineteen, "King Tut" was forgotten from history, until the discovery of his tomb in 1922 propelled him to worldwide fame. But the circumstances of his death remain shrouded in mystery.... X-rays of Tutankhamen's skull suggest a violent death. Was it accident or murder? Several members of his family died around the same time--was is coincidence? Why did Tutankhamen's widow send desperate messages to the Hittite king, requesting marriage to one of his sons? And who murdered the Hittite price on his journey to Egypt? Who ordered the removal of Tutankhamen's name from all monuments and temples, and thus from Egyptian history? This fascinating, painstakingly researched book is the first to explore in depth the questionable circumstances of Tutankhamen's demise--and to present a shocking scenario of betrayal, ambition, and murder. In The Murder of Tutankhamen, renowned Egyptologist Bob Brier reveals an exciting journey into ancient history--and a 3,000 year-old mystery that still compels us today. "Brier's 3,000-year-old mystery steadily draws the reader into the curious and exotic world of Egyptology."--The New York Times INCLUDES 16 PAGES OF PHOTOS

30 review for The Murder of Tutankhamen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    Yet another version of the so-called murder of Pharaoh Tutankhamen and this one reads more like a history book. After an ambiguous stealthy scene of a shadowy figure creeping into the sleeping youth's bedroom, striking a vicious blow to the head and creeping away, the tale continues with the lingering slow decline of Tutankhamen until his death. The scramble to get a tomb finished and personal effects collected even as his body is mummified, ending with the funeral, last meal of the mourners and Yet another version of the so-called murder of Pharaoh Tutankhamen and this one reads more like a history book. After an ambiguous stealthy scene of a shadowy figure creeping into the sleeping youth's bedroom, striking a vicious blow to the head and creeping away, the tale continues with the lingering slow decline of Tutankhamen until his death. The scramble to get a tomb finished and personal effects collected even as his body is mummified, ending with the funeral, last meal of the mourners and the Valley of the Kings being left. Then we shift back in time to the unification of the Two Lands into Egypt. The dynasties that followed, the development of the three main supports of the government: the scribes, the priesthood/religion and the military. But the focus lands on the 18th dynasty, Tut's ancestors, and the radical changes of Akhenaten in the town of Amarna which in turn had his youngest son succeed to the throne and discard his father's changes. Moving forward thousands of years and a basic overview of the exploration, excavation and the plundering of the treasures of ancient Egypt. Some of the more well-known names. The discoveries in the Valley of the Kings. Carter and Lord Carnarvon and the incredible find of a relatively undisturbed tomb (there were signs that it had been broken into soon after Tut's burial). The years dedicated to recording and removal of the thousands of artifacts. Then the author comes in with his own questions regarding the death of the most famous Egyptian pharaoh - searching for the x-rays taken back in the 1920's. Actually looking at the walls of the tomb and comparing it to other painted royal tombs. Searching for other artifacts - the ring that celebrated the marriage of Aye to Queen Ankhsenamen, Tut's widow. The coffins of the mummified fetuses. Brier tries to present an unbiased case for Tut's murder as well as the possible culprits - Aye, general Horemheb, an outsider - for both the defense as well as the prosecution. The most glaring evidence not only has Aye marry into the royal dynasty and assume the throne of Pharaoh but even later, Horemheb becomes pharaoh and dates his reign from the death of Amenhotep III, wiping out the reigns of Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten, Smenkare (Tut's half-brother), Tutankhamen and Aye. In turn, Aye and Horemheb, both commoners, made room for the next pharaoh to be a commoner, Ramses I, father and grandfather to Seti I and Ramses the Great. Overall, an interesting book that allows the reader to make their own decision who may have killed Tut as well as giving many more details of the culture of ancient Egypt - for the poor as well as the skilled and royalty.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    So this is a really cool, interesting book. However, it is outdated. New research has evidence to prove that Tutankhamen was not murdered. However, it goes into great detail about his life, his wife's story-which is really interesting. So I would recommend this book for the knowledge you gain concerning his life-Just ignore the stuff about his death. :) So this is a really cool, interesting book. However, it is outdated. New research has evidence to prove that Tutankhamen was not murdered. However, it goes into great detail about his life, his wife's story-which is really interesting. So I would recommend this book for the knowledge you gain concerning his life-Just ignore the stuff about his death. :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Randee

    My passionate obsession with all things ancient Egyptian, particularly the 18th century, particularly Akhenaten, has never diminished since I was around 7-8 years old. I found this book at a used bookstore for $5 and was thrilled to add it to my collection as Dr. Brier is a well known Egyptologist. As many others have stated, DNA has more or less proved that Tutankhamen, the son of Akhenaten and one of his sisters, was not murdered by his vizier, Aye; it's still an interesting book with some goo My passionate obsession with all things ancient Egyptian, particularly the 18th century, particularly Akhenaten, has never diminished since I was around 7-8 years old. I found this book at a used bookstore for $5 and was thrilled to add it to my collection as Dr. Brier is a well known Egyptologist. As many others have stated, DNA has more or less proved that Tutankhamen, the son of Akhenaten and one of his sisters, was not murdered by his vizier, Aye; it's still an interesting book with some good pictures and presentation of why Tut could have been murdered. There will always be discussions and arguments about ancient Egypt but that is part of the fun. I know more about the royals of the 18th dynasty than I do some members of my blood family. This is written in a very casual, as opposed to scholarly, manner which makes it a fun and easy read. Dr. Brier also makes it clear that his conjecture about Tut's murder may very well be overturned at some point in the future as science becomes more sophisticated. A decade or so after the writing of this book, DNA testing was done on the mummy of Tutankhamen as well as some other royal mummies that points more conclusively to their relationships to one another, as well as diseases and other genetic based data. Poor Tutankhamen was the son of a brother and sister (incest was common among royals) and had several health issues. Tutankhamen was married to his own half sister, the third daughter of Akhenaten and Nefertiti. This may explain why his sister wife, Ankhesenpaaten, miscarried both of their daughters. What happened to Ankhesenpaaten? Her body has never been found. She married (unwillingly) the vizier who grabbed the throne after Tut's death and then, disappeared from history. There will always be mysteries to solve and I will never tire of reading about them.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Mead

    Yes, I'm a history nerd - this book proves it. xD I originally thought this book was fiction, and so I was a bit disappointed when I found that it wasn't. However, once I started reading, my disappointment turned to engrossment (if that's even a word? xD) and I was hooked. This book is absolutely fascinating. It explores the history of Tutankhamen's predecessors and his short reign. It recounts the history surrounding the finding of his tomb and what has happened in the years since. It delves in Yes, I'm a history nerd - this book proves it. xD I originally thought this book was fiction, and so I was a bit disappointed when I found that it wasn't. However, once I started reading, my disappointment turned to engrossment (if that's even a word? xD) and I was hooked. This book is absolutely fascinating. It explores the history of Tutankhamen's predecessors and his short reign. It recounts the history surrounding the finding of his tomb and what has happened in the years since. It delves into the mystery surrounding his death and takes an analytical approach to narrowing down the murder suspects. This book is rich in detail and truly makes history come alive. I'll admit that though I'm a huge history nerd, ancient history isn't exactly an area of huge interest for me. But this book totally threw that personal preference down the drain. I can't emphasise enough how fascinating and intriguing I found this book! It gives an in depth look into a rich and complex period of history and I loved it. The only reason I'm not giving it 5* is because I only give 5* to books that are my absolute all-time favourites, or books that deeply touched me on a heart/emotional level. This book just wasn't that type of book. But I still found it absolutely engrossing and I highly recommend it to anyone looking to widen their knowledge of ancient Egypt or basically any lover of history out there.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Ah, those silly anicents, leaving great treasures buried but forgetting to mark the X on the map. Poor Tut, he should've copyrighted his own death, considering how many people seem to make money off of it. Or maybe Egypt should've. I must have seen the documentary that Brier did that inspired his book. I know I have seen his other specials. His like Simon Schmna, interesting to listen to but something about those mannerisms. Brier's book is quite easy to read, and while he writes for an non-Egypt Ah, those silly anicents, leaving great treasures buried but forgetting to mark the X on the map. Poor Tut, he should've copyrighted his own death, considering how many people seem to make money off of it. Or maybe Egypt should've. I must have seen the documentary that Brier did that inspired his book. I know I have seen his other specials. His like Simon Schmna, interesting to listen to but something about those mannerisms. Brier's book is quite easy to read, and while he writes for an non-Egypt specialist, such as moi, he doesn't think his reader is an idiot. He presumes that a reader intersted enough to read his book knows something, so while he does give background infromation, it is like a refresher course. His style and tone are great; he is much better to read than to watch. He is very, very clear and painstakingly honest about when he guesses and when he knows for sure. Because Brier's allows the reader to access his (Brier's) fasination with Tut, the book feels very personal. But this also weakens his argument. While Brier does an excellent job as a prosecutor in terms of his defendent, the problem is that one has the feeling, encouraged by Brier's honestly, that defendent is chosen simply due to Brier's dislike. In some ways, this is like reading Cornwall's Portrait Of A Killer: Jack The Ripper -- Case Closed. Though this comparsion is hugely unfair and slightly inaccurate. Unlike Cornwall, Brier is honest, brutally honest, about his prejudice and, more importantly, he consults and cites outside experts who owe him nothing, who don't work for him, and have no reason to curry his favor. Which makes him much better than Cornwall because even though he has predjudices and goes into the case with a theory to prove and not discover, he at least admits it, constantly.

  6. 5 out of 5

    The Badger

    I read this ages ago, imagining a strong, virile king cut down in his prime. However, over 20 years later, we now know that the young king had serious physical deformities, suffered from malaria, and was inbred. He would have walked using a cane due to a club foot. Even the theory that Tut was murdered is now in question. This is a good reference to read regarding the recent CAT scan and DNA analysis: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/ne... I read this ages ago, imagining a strong, virile king cut down in his prime. However, over 20 years later, we now know that the young king had serious physical deformities, suffered from malaria, and was inbred. He would have walked using a cane due to a club foot. Even the theory that Tut was murdered is now in question. This is a good reference to read regarding the recent CAT scan and DNA analysis: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/ne...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    I've read a few books about Tut, the rockstar of Egyptology. This was one of the better ones - it looks at his death from the point of forensics and makes an interesting case for murder. Better still, the books gives a great, interesting and detailed overview of the events in Egypt thousands of years before and well after Tut's death, including a good chunk on the Amarna period. I've read a few books about Tut, the rockstar of Egyptology. This was one of the better ones - it looks at his death from the point of forensics and makes an interesting case for murder. Better still, the books gives a great, interesting and detailed overview of the events in Egypt thousands of years before and well after Tut's death, including a good chunk on the Amarna period.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Nicely written but the title is wrong. Less then 15 % actually is about the murder and who could have done it. The rest is about his life and his ancestors.

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

    Although his theories have been disproved in the past two years - the book is a great read and his material on the 18th dynasty is great.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    After three long years, I finally received The Murder of Tutankhamen as a Christmas gift. I've been dying for this book since I took every available Great Courses course by Bob Brier. I am something of an addict when it comes to Egyptology, even if it has no association with my chosen course in life. There is something about the classes held by Brier, an energy that makes ancient history seem as if it is the most exciting topic known to mankind. Information is always easily digestible, and forma After three long years, I finally received The Murder of Tutankhamen as a Christmas gift. I've been dying for this book since I took every available Great Courses course by Bob Brier. I am something of an addict when it comes to Egyptology, even if it has no association with my chosen course in life. There is something about the classes held by Brier, an energy that makes ancient history seem as if it is the most exciting topic known to mankind. Information is always easily digestible, and formatted in such a way as to be understandable and relatable. I was hopeful that the aspects that have made the classes so enjoyable would translate into this book as well, and The Murder of Tutankhamen did not disappoint. The Murder of Tutankhamen is fantastic, based on forensic and as factual of information possible for 1998 in which it was published. Some information may, or may not be, accurate in the present day, but considering the date of publication, the information in The Murder of Tutankhamen is incredibly educational and all theories have both sides of the story portrayed. Even opposing ideas are given their spot in the limelight, before being fully disproved by the author's findings. All in all, The Murder of Tutankhamen is all that I could have dreamt of and more. It was exactly what I had hoped for over the past three years and I am beyond thrilled to have had the chance to have read it. I surprisingly learned many small details about Tutankhamen and his ancestors as well as those who came after him, that I was pleasantly unaware of. The pictures included were educational, and unexpected, but a fantastic inclusion. I highly recommend this book to any Egyptology fans out there.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael Joosten

    The populist draw to read this book is the salacious idea of Tutankhamen's murder and Brier capitalizes on it, but even where science may have since invalidated his theory (an outcome he considered possible and prepares the reader to consider), his book remains eminently readable because it is also engagingly-written and a concise history of both Ancient Egypt through the dawn of the 20th Dynasty and of Egyptology through Howard Carter. Brier is able to open up for the lay reader a wealth of inf The populist draw to read this book is the salacious idea of Tutankhamen's murder and Brier capitalizes on it, but even where science may have since invalidated his theory (an outcome he considered possible and prepares the reader to consider), his book remains eminently readable because it is also engagingly-written and a concise history of both Ancient Egypt through the dawn of the 20th Dynasty and of Egyptology through Howard Carter. Brier is able to open up for the lay reader a wealth of information about both while keeping his opinion of where the facts point squarely in the realm of opinion.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

    Flicked through this again, in the same vein as I flicked through the Christiane Desroches-Noblecourt book yesterday. Reread bits of it. I believe the actual theory is discounted now, due to more high-tech scans, but it's still interesting, because it doesn't solely seek to pose the theory that Tutankhamen was murdered -- there's a lot about his life, too, and that of Akhenaten (now confirmed to be his father, I believe?). Very exciting stuff for me, when I was younger, and still interesting when Flicked through this again, in the same vein as I flicked through the Christiane Desroches-Noblecourt book yesterday. Reread bits of it. I believe the actual theory is discounted now, due to more high-tech scans, but it's still interesting, because it doesn't solely seek to pose the theory that Tutankhamen was murdered -- there's a lot about his life, too, and that of Akhenaten (now confirmed to be his father, I believe?). Very exciting stuff for me, when I was younger, and still interesting when I read it now.

  13. 4 out of 5

    'Aussie Rick'

    This book is a bit off my normal reading taste but I found it to be a fun and interesting account of Ancient Eygpt and the circumstances surrounding the death of Tutankhamen. I enjoyed it a great deal and it has sparked a desire to learn & read more about this period of history. If an author can inspire his readers to search out and learn more on a subject then his book has done a good job. Overall it was an interesting and worthwhile read, buy a copy and enjoy!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cat.

    Lots of really interesting facts about the people, beliefs, & customs of the people around during Egypt's 18th dynasty. I now sort of understand the controversy of Tut's father Akhenaten. The author goes off on a tangent and builds the case that Akhenaten had Marfan's Syndrome, which explains why his "portraits" are so different from the other art. And there is the murder plot.... Yeah. Good, well-written, and clear! Wish all Egyptian history was this easy to follow. Lots of really interesting facts about the people, beliefs, & customs of the people around during Egypt's 18th dynasty. I now sort of understand the controversy of Tut's father Akhenaten. The author goes off on a tangent and builds the case that Akhenaten had Marfan's Syndrome, which explains why his "portraits" are so different from the other art. And there is the murder plot.... Yeah. Good, well-written, and clear! Wish all Egyptian history was this easy to follow.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Zoë

    An easy and engaging read that explains about Tutankhamun's ancestors and the world he was born into before really getting to the potential circumstances of his death. Very much a piece of popular scientific writing, but one that avoids sensationalism and provides nuanced insights supported by a balanced number of references and footnotes. The lack of a firm conclusion may be disappointing to some, but I found it appropriate, as the cultural upset surrounding Tut's rule felt very much more like An easy and engaging read that explains about Tutankhamun's ancestors and the world he was born into before really getting to the potential circumstances of his death. Very much a piece of popular scientific writing, but one that avoids sensationalism and provides nuanced insights supported by a balanced number of references and footnotes. The lack of a firm conclusion may be disappointing to some, but I found it appropriate, as the cultural upset surrounding Tut's rule felt very much more like the point of the story than his actual death. Being a bit of an Egyptology geek with a love of documentary films I had already heard of a lot of the facts and theories contained in this book, although not often all together, or so thoroughly explained. Definitely recommend it both as an introduction to novices on the subject, and those who -like me- already have a general interest. It is perhaps a bit outdated by now, but no less interesting for it. Just a good reason to read more about ancient Egypt if you enjoyed this!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    I’ve always been fascinated with the story if King Tut and with Egypt. I blame that fascination on reading The Egypt Game in elementary school. This book was written a lot like a textbook but with just enough fictional flare to keep it interesting. I was absolutely appalled by the damage done to Tut’s mummy by Douglas Derry. I try to tell myself that he knew no better but urgh...the things we could have known! Of course, we now know that Tut is not the young, fit king described here. It is quest I’ve always been fascinated with the story if King Tut and with Egypt. I blame that fascination on reading The Egypt Game in elementary school. This book was written a lot like a textbook but with just enough fictional flare to keep it interesting. I was absolutely appalled by the damage done to Tut’s mummy by Douglas Derry. I try to tell myself that he knew no better but urgh...the things we could have known! Of course, we now know that Tut is not the young, fit king described here. It is questiined if he was even murdered but...I doubt we will ever know for sure. I look forward to finding some other books on Ancient Egypt that capture my attention.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Violet

    I was completely engaged. So many interesting twists and turns that can only be derived from real life. I was captivated by this story and this time. The brief history of Egypt held more for me than other books I’ve read with a general history overview. A fast and sumptuous read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maria Ettlin

    Interesting theory

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

    A really interesting read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    Quick, fun, and interesting read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Weil

    Definitely aimed at the lay reader rather than the specialist, but still has very good arguments and presents evidence in an understandable way.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Louise Pare-Lobinske

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I thought it was very good. It was too bad that later research came out and shed some doubt on this theory of Tutankhamen's death. I thought it was very good. It was too bad that later research came out and shed some doubt on this theory of Tutankhamen's death.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Fascinating read, loads of history leading up to the life and times of the most famous Egyptian Pharoah! Even with scientific advances, we may never know what really happened to King Tut.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Very well written. Possibly out of date now.

  25. 5 out of 5

    KJ Mcilwain

    Very creative how the author merged a possible history story of this ancient king with scientific evidence in a setting that revealed more about the history of ancient Egypt and their customs.

  26. 5 out of 5

    John Hackett

    Interesting book, going way beyond the detail of my secondary school history. A little dry in parts but fascinating all the same.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristen (belles_bookshelves)

    "The characters live and breathe; you feel you know them." So even though this book is from the late 90s and information in here might be outdated (and might continue to become more outdated as time goes on), it is still such an interesting read. It delves a lot into King Tut's relationship with his sister-wife (a lot of which I didn't know, because much of the focus on him in school when I was young was simply about Carter and the discovery of his tomb). Even the science behind his potential mur "The characters live and breathe; you feel you know them." So even though this book is from the late 90s and information in here might be outdated (and might continue to become more outdated as time goes on), it is still such an interesting read. It delves a lot into King Tut's relationship with his sister-wife (a lot of which I didn't know, because much of the focus on him in school when I was young was simply about Carter and the discovery of his tomb). Even the science behind his potential murder is interesting to read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kelli Sprowls

    Firstly I will state that I received a copy of this book from the goodreads giveaways.That being said, this book was more than I was expecting when I entered the giveaway. The author explains in the introduction to the book that he was just presenting a theory which would explain what had happened to Tutankhamen and his young wife based upon his investigations. As someone who has seen some specials on Egyptology and read a few books, but who had no real knowledge of the progression of the pharao Firstly I will state that I received a copy of this book from the goodreads giveaways.That being said, this book was more than I was expecting when I entered the giveaway. The author explains in the introduction to the book that he was just presenting a theory which would explain what had happened to Tutankhamen and his young wife based upon his investigations. As someone who has seen some specials on Egyptology and read a few books, but who had no real knowledge of the progression of the pharaohs, I appreciated that the author decided to devote the beginning of the book to some basic Egyptian history and the culture and societal structure of those times. He did a very good job of presenting this quick history in an informative way that was also entertaining and in a way that I believe even those with a greater understanding of Egyptian history would enjoy. I really enjoyed the way he presented his case for murder and presented the information to the reader almost like a prosecutor presenting a case in court. The author gave a history of the pharaohs and Tutankhamen's family line, which was very helpful to someone such as I who knows some names but has no real inkling of the progression or how they are related to each other. In general I just really enjoyed the book a lot and now am inspired to learn more about these names that the author brought to life (and death) in this very well-written book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    So, I'll be honest; I almost completely forgot I even had this book. I think I bought it at Borders, so that should tell you how long I've had it. But I went to see the King Tut exhibit this weekend, so this was the perfect book to bring. I was expecting a dry, dull book, because sadly, a lot of non-fiction (especially historical) tend to be that way. This book was not dry at all! It was actually very engaging! Brier has a great writing style and voice. He made a few comments that were incredibly So, I'll be honest; I almost completely forgot I even had this book. I think I bought it at Borders, so that should tell you how long I've had it. But I went to see the King Tut exhibit this weekend, so this was the perfect book to bring. I was expecting a dry, dull book, because sadly, a lot of non-fiction (especially historical) tend to be that way. This book was not dry at all! It was actually very engaging! Brier has a great writing style and voice. He made a few comments that were incredibly witty and funny, which was not what I was expecting from a scholarly type person. Plus his writing style was very smooth and engaging. It felt almost like a fiction book, to some extent. This book is also a great Egyptology 101, as well as being very informative about Tut and his family. Brier mentions other popular pharaohs including Hatsheput, Ramses the Great, and Cleopatra, to name a few. His insight on Tut's life was really intriguing. It is a bit out-dated, since the book originally came out in '98, and even the new version was updated a decade ago. Still, it's very good basics - unless everything we know about Tut has radically changed in the past ten years. I wouldn't know, unfortunately. But overall, this was a good read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Winter

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book was loaned to me by April Hazamy. It reminds me of why I should read more non-fiction. It was thought provoking and provided several nice conversations between me and Frank about King Tut and that period of time in Egypt. So a few thoughts in particular came out of my reading. Akenaten, Tut's father, moved the HQ of the govt of Egypt from Thebes to Amarna and got rid of the old gods and worshiped only the sun god. This wrecked everything Egypt had been for centuries prior. Akenaten was This book was loaned to me by April Hazamy. It reminds me of why I should read more non-fiction. It was thought provoking and provided several nice conversations between me and Frank about King Tut and that period of time in Egypt. So a few thoughts in particular came out of my reading. Akenaten, Tut's father, moved the HQ of the govt of Egypt from Thebes to Amarna and got rid of the old gods and worshiped only the sun god. This wrecked everything Egypt had been for centuries prior. Akenaten was a gentle humanist. And from his realm came horrible changes for the future of Egypt. Also, Akenaten and his wife seem to have had Marfen's disease, which elongated their fingers and hands, made their skulls elongated in back, and gave them slitted eyes (among other symptoms). This made them look like aliens. Makes me wonder if we had aliens actively living among us during that period of time. Tut appears to have been killed by his vizier, who married his wife and became Pharoah after Tut's death. His vizier was then succeeded by Tut's military man. Both of these men were not from the ruling class and forever changed Egypt. Very Interesting read.

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