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Genkaku Picasso, Vol. 1

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Having cheated death, Hikaru Hamura must save himself by using his artistic abilities to help others. Hikari Hamura, nicknamed Picasso because of his natural artistic abilities, survived a horrible accident, but his friend Chiaki wasn't so lucky. Suddenly, Chiaki appears in front of him and tells him in order to keep living he must help the people around him. Can Hikari sav Having cheated death, Hikaru Hamura must save himself by using his artistic abilities to help others. Hikari Hamura, nicknamed Picasso because of his natural artistic abilities, survived a horrible accident, but his friend Chiaki wasn't so lucky. Suddenly, Chiaki appears in front of him and tells him in order to keep living he must help the people around him. Can Hikari save people with his sketchbook and a 2B pencil?


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Having cheated death, Hikaru Hamura must save himself by using his artistic abilities to help others. Hikari Hamura, nicknamed Picasso because of his natural artistic abilities, survived a horrible accident, but his friend Chiaki wasn't so lucky. Suddenly, Chiaki appears in front of him and tells him in order to keep living he must help the people around him. Can Hikari sav Having cheated death, Hikaru Hamura must save himself by using his artistic abilities to help others. Hikari Hamura, nicknamed Picasso because of his natural artistic abilities, survived a horrible accident, but his friend Chiaki wasn't so lucky. Suddenly, Chiaki appears in front of him and tells him in order to keep living he must help the people around him. Can Hikari save people with his sketchbook and a 2B pencil?

30 review for Genkaku Picasso, Vol. 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    A lot of manga have the most convoluted, pernickety premises – I can’t fault the imagination behind them though they do get awkwardly set up within a short space of time. So it goes with the first volume of Genkaku Picasso! A high school student miraculously escapes death because his actually dead classmate made a deal with Buddha to spare his life. In return, he must use his drawing skills to help those in need or he will rot. He senses troubled people’s auras and sketches enigmatic visions who A lot of manga have the most convoluted, pernickety premises – I can’t fault the imagination behind them though they do get awkwardly set up within a short space of time. So it goes with the first volume of Genkaku Picasso! A high school student miraculously escapes death because his actually dead classmate made a deal with Buddha to spare his life. In return, he must use his drawing skills to help those in need or he will rot. He senses troubled people’s auras and sketches enigmatic visions whose meaning he must unravel whilst also inhabiting the drawings! It’s a strange idea for a series but this first book wasn’t bad. It’s a little too contrived – Picasso always manages to intervene at the exact time the people are about to do something crazy like commit murder or suicide. And all the people he has to help happen to be in his class at school or in a nearby class. The main character isn’t particularly likeable or interesting and resembles a weasel at the best of times. Not sure why the book is called “Genkaku” either as it’s not his name though I get that “Picasso” is a pun on his real name. And I’m not sure if she was meant to be but the suicidal ultra-emo goth chick was really funny! Still, the mysteries of what was wrong with the various characters was compelling to see solved and I wouldn’t say I found it a boring read. The haunting, dream-like imagery was quite arresting and I liked the difference in art styles between the drawing world and the real world – normal, clear lines for the real world and shaggy, sketch-lines for the drawing world. Usamaru Furuya’s first Genkaku Picasso book wasn’t bad but it didn’t do enough for me to want to keep reading the other two books in the run – it’s just a tad too gimmicky and it was already feeling repetitive towards the end of this first volume. I’ve said it before but not every manga needs to be a series!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    Reason for Reading: The publisher's simple one line tag at pre-publication grabbed my attention and piqued my interest. "Having cheated death, Hikaru Hamura must save himself by using his artistic abilities to help others." Hikaru, who has been nick-named Picasso, is pretty much a loner type of guy who really likes to spend his time alone drawing in his sketchbook whenever he can. He has one close friend, a girl named Chiaki. They are both in a terrible accident and Chiaki is killed but Hikaru su Reason for Reading: The publisher's simple one line tag at pre-publication grabbed my attention and piqued my interest. "Having cheated death, Hikaru Hamura must save himself by using his artistic abilities to help others." Hikaru, who has been nick-named Picasso, is pretty much a loner type of guy who really likes to spend his time alone drawing in his sketchbook whenever he can. He has one close friend, a girl named Chiaki. They are both in a terrible accident and Chiaki is killed but Hikaru survives. What he soon learns is that he really did die but he has been allowed to live if he uses his drawings to help others. If he lets too much time go by his body begins to rot, starting with his arm. This is the driving force that compels him to help other people, that and Chiaki has come back as a little angel of some sort to be his companion. I was at first surprised to find that this is not one continuous story but each chapter is episodic being more of a short story centering around the person and their problem that Picasso and Chiaki help out. As the stories move on, he gathers friends and an overall running story arc about the characters begins to take shape. The stories are quite interesting and I must say surprised me in how dark they became as the cover and summary gave no indication of this element. I like dark so this is when the book picked up for me, though some of the themes are a bit on the weird side and this is definitely an older Teen book as recommended by the publisher. The first story sets up the whole plot of the book, with the accident and Picasso finding out his unfortunate future and helping his first person. The person's problem and resolution were a little far-fetched and I wondered what the rest of the book would be like but I was ready for the next story. We've now picked up Sugiura, a boy, as a friend from the first story and Picasso helps a girl who is a teen model. This story deals with childhood grief and again was a bit out there but the story became darker and we picked up Akane, the girl, as another new friend for Picasso. Next is when things really went dark and weird with the next story where Picasso helps a boy and the story touches on the theme of S&M as well as teens who are loners and finally the last story, another very dark one, deals with suicide and hero worship. A very eclectic mix of stories! By the end of the book Picasso had grown from a whining complainer who didn't want this to be happening to him to someone who was beginning to take charge of his new calling. I certainly enjoyed the main characters and am interested to see where this goes with the next volume. The first two stories were a little overdone and had they all been like that I would not have enjoyed the book but the characters kept my interest through them and then the last two stories were very creepy and dark, as well as insightful. The art is amazing. When Picasso draws his pictures we get full page detailed drawings that are intricate and gorgeous in their weirdness. Still, I'll be reading Volume 2 before making a final call on whether to continue with the series.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nelson

    This is the second manga by Usamaru Furuya that I've read, No Longer Human being the first. Both of these series have one thing in common, and that thing is first volumes that are decent but underwhelming. My hope is that this will follow the same pattern as NLH and improve drastically on the following volumes. The story is fairly simple, following a "monster of the week" format, but with mentally disturbed people in need of saving. The premise of jumping into people's drawings and figuring out t This is the second manga by Usamaru Furuya that I've read, No Longer Human being the first. Both of these series have one thing in common, and that thing is first volumes that are decent but underwhelming. My hope is that this will follow the same pattern as NLH and improve drastically on the following volumes. The story is fairly simple, following a "monster of the week" format, but with mentally disturbed people in need of saving. The premise of jumping into people's drawings and figuring out their symbolism in order to understand them and hopefully save them appealed to me, being that I'm a fan of Persona and dream analysis. That said, what we get here is a fairly simplistic set of problems that get solved rather easily and unceremoniously. Hopefully that will improve in the following volumes. The strong part of the book is definitely the art. The sketchy parts of the art used for Picasso's paintings specifically. They look absolutely incredible and it's a lot of fun to try to analyze the drawing before the characters figure it out. It's also really cool to see the drawing change based on the characters' actions, both inside and outside the drawing. That said, the "real world" artwork leaves something to be desired. While I like it enough for the most part, certain things like the way lips are shaded, were a bit off-putting. The "real world" art style varied in general, and sometimes I felt like I was reading something by CLAMP while other times it would look like Jump's house style; and somewhere in the middle of that, Furuya's own style shines bright. [Edit: Upon flipping through the other volumes, I can see that the "real world" art I criticized improves a lot, so that's great news.] All in all, the series is good and it has potential, but this volume left me a bit underwhelmed.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I love the concept! It just gets repetitive...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Drew Constance

    Quick thoughts: Engaging plot, imaginative illustrations and nice touch of Magic. Warning: Does contain mild subtle sexual content and nudity – recommended for readers 16 + I have been reading a lot of Manga and Graphic novels lately. I am really enjoying the different format and styles both storyline and artwork. So when I saw Picasso at my local library and read the blurb I knew I wanted to try it out, if not just for the stunning art work on the front cover and the promise of mystery and a litt Quick thoughts: Engaging plot, imaginative illustrations and nice touch of Magic. Warning: Does contain mild subtle sexual content and nudity – recommended for readers 16 + I have been reading a lot of Manga and Graphic novels lately. I am really enjoying the different format and styles both storyline and artwork. So when I saw Picasso at my local library and read the blurb I knew I wanted to try it out, if not just for the stunning art work on the front cover and the promise of mystery and a little slice of magic. I really enjoyed the first instalment. The illustrations are superb and intense. I love how the author used them in an almost dream-scape manner to get inside the characters hearts and how their emotions and behaviours were reflected in the pictures. Some of them were darkly morbid, while others were hilarious and had me chuckling on the train ride home. The style is different to many I have read in being the boys look a lot like the girls, but I really dig it and while I must admit there are some scenes in it that I thought might be better for adults, I believe if your mature enough to handle the more mature content then you will enjoy the stories in Picasso. I liked the way the stories dealt with certain issues both apparent to teens and adults and the psychological elements in each. It brought something refreshing to the table. Questions to ponder, but not to be consumed by and I really did feel for the characters issues. Picassso himself is a very sullen character and I guess you could go as far to say he is a Zombie. I enjoyed how he was pulled into the characters lives, and how each story was different and gave him the chance to help others and to stop being the loner he now is after loosing his best friend. But not to fear, there is a little magic and the concept to me is imaginative and really fun to read. I am not sure I would say I have a favourite character but I did quiet enjoy the friendship of Picasso [Hamura] and Chiaki. If you want to try something different that is a little dark, but a fun, quick and imaginative read then I would recommend checking out Picasso 1# !!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sinai C.

    I don't know why on earth this got such bad reviews from people I know! 2 Stars: Art style. As usual, I give two stars for art since it is a book based on it's art. I thought that although the main character, "Picasso", is REALLY unattractive (except for one page where his glasses are OFF!!), and the style choices, like for the lips and eyes can annoy me a bit, I think it pulled it off well enough. Especially the scenes that Picasso himself draws. I thought they were unique and beautiful. They we I don't know why on earth this got such bad reviews from people I know! 2 Stars: Art style. As usual, I give two stars for art since it is a book based on it's art. I thought that although the main character, "Picasso", is REALLY unattractive (except for one page where his glasses are OFF!!), and the style choices, like for the lips and eyes can annoy me a bit, I think it pulled it off well enough. Especially the scenes that Picasso himself draws. I thought they were unique and beautiful. They were gorgeous sketches and you can see how they'd represent someone's heart :) 1 Star: Characters. Don't get me wrong, I feel like the characters aren't the best, and Picasso is a bit hard to live with, but I think we really do get a lot of both Picasso and the characters when he's inside the drawings of their hearts. Figuring out the problem and helping them get through it was really such a wonderful thing to read. It was touching :3 1 Star: Potential. It has it. Maybe it's been done before, sure, but I think that if this continues the way it is, with it's tender drawing style and maybe, hopefully, an evolving character of Picasso, I think I'll really like this series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This manga was a weird one... It has a very interesting premise: the protagonist survived death but in exchange must use his art skills to help the people around him by drawing surreal sketches of what's inside their hearts and interpreting these abstract portraits to solve their problems. The problem is that the issues the people around him have are just plain bizarre and unrealistic. For example, one kid is sick as a result of some deep-seated trauma related to her pet rabbit's sudden death wh This manga was a weird one... It has a very interesting premise: the protagonist survived death but in exchange must use his art skills to help the people around him by drawing surreal sketches of what's inside their hearts and interpreting these abstract portraits to solve their problems. The problem is that the issues the people around him have are just plain bizarre and unrealistic. For example, one kid is sick as a result of some deep-seated trauma related to her pet rabbit's sudden death when she was a baby. Okay, that's fine so far... But at the dramatic climax of this chapter, it is revealed that the rabbit didn't die from vegetables but actually died of dehydration because they never gave the poor bunny any water. The girl's mother expresses shock at realizing that rabbits need water to survive! And so the girl realizes that vegetables won't kill her and becomes healthy as a result. The way the author tries to depict complex themes through surreal art but then goes and uses common sense as twists just boggles my mind. I like the premise, but I don't think I'll be reading more of this series.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stacie

    A loner artist, nicknamed Picasso, is involved in an accident that nearly kills him. He is gifted an extension on life, on the terms that he is to help the people around him. If he doesn't, his body will slowly rot away. He uses his art as a way of understanding those in close proximity to him. Picasso is able to see an aura around people, and can view what is going on in their hearts. He then draws what he sees and jumps into the artwork in hopes of altering the person's fragile mental state. Th A loner artist, nicknamed Picasso, is involved in an accident that nearly kills him. He is gifted an extension on life, on the terms that he is to help the people around him. If he doesn't, his body will slowly rot away. He uses his art as a way of understanding those in close proximity to him. Picasso is able to see an aura around people, and can view what is going on in their hearts. He then draws what he sees and jumps into the artwork in hopes of altering the person's fragile mental state. This is a really cool concept. I enjoyed it for the most part, with the exception of the hurried resolutions to each arc. Each of the plot issues were easily resolved and didn't hold much weight. But, the overall idea that this kid has to help others or else he dies is interesting enough to continue. I think that the character designs were okay, but the art that Picasso actually draws is gorgeous. Those panels reminded me of surreal dream sequences or something in a similar vein. I'm curious to see more of those types of panels from this manga series.

  9. 4 out of 5

    ayanami

    A creative idea for a manga series but the solutions to each of the students' problems seem a bit too easy at times... Everything is wrapped up neatly in a nice bow but doesn't always feel realistic in terms of the seriousness of some of the problems. But I think this is fairly typical for the genre. A creative idea for a manga series but the solutions to each of the students' problems seem a bit too easy at times... Everything is wrapped up neatly in a nice bow but doesn't always feel realistic in terms of the seriousness of some of the problems. But I think this is fairly typical for the genre.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stella

    This surreal series was a trap that seemed smooth and easy to get into, but then as soon as I felt comfortable, it dropped me into a pool of existential despair. I recognize that not everyone will relate to these characters or care that much about Hikari himself, but I give credit to the author/editor team for making a terribly strong work of art.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dyslexic Bookmonster

    The tortured soul of an artist. I have the manga series on my bookshelves and this is certainly not the first time I read it. It is the kind of feel-good story with enough elements of hardship in it, which makes me come back to it every few years. I dig it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Antisocial boy was supposed to die in an accident but his friend prayed for him top live. He's alive now but can only stay alive if he helps people. He uses his art ability to draw people's hearts and enters the drawings to help them deal with problems. Antisocial boy was supposed to die in an accident but his friend prayed for him top live. He's alive now but can only stay alive if he helps people. He uses his art ability to draw people's hearts and enters the drawings to help them deal with problems.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Interesting graphics and twist on a theme. It’s annoying the kid keeps biting his thumb and pushing his glasses up with his middle finger, but it eventually grows on you. Favourite Quotes: "There might be a surprising number of kids who are like trees." Interesting graphics and twist on a theme. It’s annoying the kid keeps biting his thumb and pushing his glasses up with his middle finger, but it eventually grows on you. Favourite Quotes: "There might be a surprising number of kids who are like trees."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kurtis Burkhardt

    Pretty great manga, Loved the story and art 😁😻❤️❤️

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Really interesting premise, fantastic artwork. I'm excited to see where the series goes! Really interesting premise, fantastic artwork. I'm excited to see where the series goes!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tongtongie

    I find the way this author deals with real problems that students, and people in general, have to face very imaginative. It leaves an impact but is not invasive.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    Very weird, but I’m into it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    ReadingFrog

    1.5 stars.

  19. 4 out of 5

    typewriterdeluxe

    A stand-offish high school artist miraculously survives death (thanks to a life-saving wish made by his only friend) but has to continuously help people overcome their personal problems/complexes in order to keep his body intact. Since he's a jerky loner who hasn't developed social skills, hijinks ensue. I like the concept of Genkaku Picasso because I don't often see stories about wannabe 'heroes' doing 'good' for selfish purposes. (Side note: there's an ad for "Death Note" at the end of Genkaku A stand-offish high school artist miraculously survives death (thanks to a life-saving wish made by his only friend) but has to continuously help people overcome their personal problems/complexes in order to keep his body intact. Since he's a jerky loner who hasn't developed social skills, hijinks ensue. I like the concept of Genkaku Picasso because I don't often see stories about wannabe 'heroes' doing 'good' for selfish purposes. (Side note: there's an ad for "Death Note" at the end of Genkaku Picasso Volume 1. I can see why they'd be grouped together in a "you may also enjoy _____" kind of way.) Unfortunately, I didn't enjoy this book like I thought I would. Although the vignette​s/episodes were appropriately over-the-top for the story (especially appropriate because the secondary main character Chiaki loves Jungian psychology), they just didn't keep my interest. Despite liking Chiaki, I found the cast of characters to be shallow and I straight-up dislike the main character Picasso/Hikari. Last but not least, I disliked the art in this comic. It's not objectively bad, but I wasn't a fan of the style. Since Genkaku Picasso is primarily about interpreting images, it was hard for me to put thoughts about this book's aesthetic on the back burner. TL;DR: Genkaku Picasso has an appealing premise and others will enjoy it, but the delivery wasn't to my taste.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Su

    Just finished volume 1--very interesting! The art style is a bit unusual, and looks a little "rougher" than what you see in typical US-released manga because it doesn't seem to use any screentones at all (the author actually draws all the beautiful, detailed backgrounds, crosshatches to shade, etc!). But that's probably about right for a manga all about art. :) Or, to be more precise, all about a certain moody, young artist, nicknamed "Picasso" by his classmates. Picasso's story begins when he an Just finished volume 1--very interesting! The art style is a bit unusual, and looks a little "rougher" than what you see in typical US-released manga because it doesn't seem to use any screentones at all (the author actually draws all the beautiful, detailed backgrounds, crosshatches to shade, etc!). But that's probably about right for a manga all about art. :) Or, to be more precise, all about a certain moody, young artist, nicknamed "Picasso" by his classmates. Picasso's story begins when he and his best friend (really, ONLY friend) Chiaki are killed in a freak accident. However, Chiaki (who's fascinating in her own right--an attractive school girl who befriends the gloomy, reclusive class "art snob" and reads Goethe for fun XD) prayed to the gods to save Picasso so that his incredible artistic talent wouldn't go to waste. The gods agreed, on the condition that Picasso help people/perform good deeds through his artwork. To aid the anti-social Picasso, Chiaki is sent back as a pocket-sized angel who pops out of Picasso's breast pocket whenever it's time to help another person. Naturally, Picasso (while touchingly glad in his own emotionally stunted way to have Chiaki "back") doesn't care to help people even if it means going back on a promise to the gods. However, his arm starts rotting whenever he's gone too long without helping someone, so that provides him the final kick in the pants he needs to venture out of his shell and interact with/help a few of his classmates--some of whom eventually become his friends. This formula probably sounds a bit familiar to those who've read supernatural/horror-ish manga before (XXXholic, Tokyo Babylon and Legal Drug by CLAMP being excellent examples of this genre), but something about the unusual/slightly-less-cutesy art style and the offbeat vibes of all the characters make it feel different and kept my interest, definitely. The beautiful pictures Picasso draws of his targets' hearts (to help assess the problem he needs to solve for them) are quite unique and a very cool way to express the various psychological hang-ups that happen to people in today's world. I'm not leaping passionately after the next volume, but I probably will check it out eventually and definitely found this one a worthwhile read. Give the first chapter a shot and see if it piques your interest.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kate (Looking Glass Reads)

    An interesting manga with amazing artwork, Genkaku Picasso, Vol. 1 by Usumaru Furuya will defy whatever expectations you might have for it. This can be both good and bad. While having an interesting premise, certain aspects fall a bit short in execution. It is currently available to read in full on the Shonen Jump website for a two dollar a month subscription. Hikari Hamura is a high schooler referred to as Picasso by his classmates both because of his hobby and a play on words which doesn’t come An interesting manga with amazing artwork, Genkaku Picasso, Vol. 1 by Usumaru Furuya will defy whatever expectations you might have for it. This can be both good and bad. While having an interesting premise, certain aspects fall a bit short in execution. It is currently available to read in full on the Shonen Jump website for a two dollar a month subscription. Hikari Hamura is a high schooler referred to as Picasso by his classmates both because of his hobby and a play on words which doesn’t come across well in English. Most afternoons he spends by the riverside with his only real friend, Chiaki. One day the unfathomable happens, and a horrible accident kills both. However, Hikari is given a second chance thanks to Chiaki’s wish. He will be able to continue living, but in exchange he must do good deeds in order to keep his body from rotting away. While certain aspects of this premise might have been seen before, the consequences of not doing good deeds is a steep one. Picasso’s body begins literally rotting away, and quickly. However, Picasso isn’t very sociable, would rather he didn’t have to bother doing good deeds, and isn’t very good at singling out problems or solving them. Though this certainly funny, it does begin to stagnate. Each issue is solved by chance, luck, or another person. This might add to the comedic element, but it doesn’t give readers much incentive to like or feel compassion for the protagonist. There was a certain unsatisfying feeling to some of the endings, largely because nothing felt resolved. Instead, there were simply Some situations which arose throughout the course of the manga were much more mature than initially expected. Readers be warned when reading out in public. The nature of the manga allows Furuya to play with the art in many ways. Character designs are varied and memorable. But where the art truly shines is through Picasso’s work. Traditional manga style gives way to greater detail and varied style. Some of Picasso’s art is utterly beautiful. Some is surreal and terrifying. All is wonderful. Genkaku Picasso, Vol. 1 by Usumaru Furuya is the beginning of a three volume manga series with an interesting premise. This review is originally found on Looking Glass Reads.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kendra

    Genkaku Picasso, Vol. 1 by Usamaru Furuya I really liked the book because it was intresting that it has some connection with picasso the painter evn thou the charater really wanted to be called a different artist.With this name you could tell they thought that he was a great artist or at least as good as picasso... or as weird as he was.The way the story was involved with art and pychology astounded mebecasue it mad you think even thoou they were doing it in the book it was like you were follo Genkaku Picasso, Vol. 1 by Usamaru Furuya I really liked the book because it was intresting that it has some connection with picasso the painter evn thou the charater really wanted to be called a different artist.With this name you could tell they thought that he was a great artist or at least as good as picasso... or as weird as he was.The way the story was involved with art and pychology astounded mebecasue it mad you think even thoou they were doing it in the book it was like you were following thier hints and tracks to find out what the pictures mean. i think this book would be good for people who like to read about mystery, supernaturea(but not too much), pychology and drawing. The book has the charater being very different from most charaters i books but he is the chaater that has everything happen to him.The way they start off gives you a deep inmprestion of the book thinking it is going tpo be a dramatic book becasue of the first chapter.Reading the first chapter make you want to read more and understand but i dont it doesnt tell you the answer in this book maybe the next one in the serise. My favorite part of the book was how you learn about everything special abot his new self after the accident.The part i liked least was to ahve to wait to find out what happens after becsue it just make you wonder becasue you try and try to figure it out but you wont get it until they give you all the clues.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Meridith

    Of all the manga I've read—and I'd say I've read a great deal—Genakaku Picasso is one of the greatest. I bought it on a whim during a sale at Barnes and Noble. This was probably one of the greatest whims I've followed in my entire life—noting with that fact that my whims actually never lead me places where I want to go—because I enjoyed it very, very much, and I think you would, too. I have nothing but praise for this, as it could really only be accurately described as a piece of art. In this man Of all the manga I've read—and I'd say I've read a great deal—Genakaku Picasso is one of the greatest. I bought it on a whim during a sale at Barnes and Noble. This was probably one of the greatest whims I've followed in my entire life—noting with that fact that my whims actually never lead me places where I want to go—because I enjoyed it very, very much, and I think you would, too. I have nothing but praise for this, as it could really only be accurately described as a piece of art. In this manga, we read about a guy who loves to draw and only to draw. He wants to be an artist when he grows up—like Da Vinchi. Unfortunately for him, the other students in his class have taken to calling him 'Picasso', a nickname he very much dislikes. Cutting to the chase and ignoring the details, however, the story is about his death. Well, not so much his death, but the death of his best friend. Okay, not so much about the death of his best friend, but how before she died, she prayed to some deity or another that Picasso would... Live, I suppose. The story escalates from here: in order to not rot away, Picasso must help others. The very special way he does this is by drawing what he sees in their hearts. This manga isn't drawn the way most are. Every picture seems like it could be its own artwork. The funny thing is, Furuya-sensei drew a manga about a student who could draw what was inside the hearts of others, but I think in doing so, he drew what his own heart looks like. I adore this series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Charles Dee Mitchell

    The set up for the story involves a pun that only works in Japanese. When Hikari wrote his name on his shoes -- is this something Japanese teenagers do? -- he accidently wrote Hikaso. And since he draws all the time, all this schoolmates call him Picasso. So that's not very interesting. But things pick up when Picasso and his almost girlfriend Chiaki have a helicopter fall on them. Chiaki dies. Picasso suffers only minor injuries. Several days later, Chiaki appears Tinkerbelle-like from the pocke The set up for the story involves a pun that only works in Japanese. When Hikari wrote his name on his shoes -- is this something Japanese teenagers do? -- he accidently wrote Hikaso. And since he draws all the time, all this schoolmates call him Picasso. So that's not very interesting. But things pick up when Picasso and his almost girlfriend Chiaki have a helicopter fall on them. Chiaki dies. Picasso suffers only minor injuries. Several days later, Chiaki appears Tinkerbelle-like from the pocket of Picasso's school jacket. Surprise! Picasso is also dead, and his body will rot unless he uses his drawings to help others. First he spots a schoolmate with a dark aura, then he draws a mysterious picture, then he is physically sucked into the picture, then he figures out what is wrong, then he makes things right. In Vol. One he does this four times. Finally, some one has created a manga that uses an absurd premise you might expect from a prime time, network series. It has good production values but it's boring.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Having barely survived having a helicopter crash on top of him (yes, really) teen recluse and art nerd Hikari discovers his art now has the power to see into the heart of those around him. But this new power comes at a price----his body will quickly decompose if he doesn't use his power to help those around him. Aided by the spirit of his dead friend Chiaki---who was also killed in the crash----he begrudgingly sets out to help his fellow students improve their lives. It has a nice balance betwee Having barely survived having a helicopter crash on top of him (yes, really) teen recluse and art nerd Hikari discovers his art now has the power to see into the heart of those around him. But this new power comes at a price----his body will quickly decompose if he doesn't use his power to help those around him. Aided by the spirit of his dead friend Chiaki---who was also killed in the crash----he begrudgingly sets out to help his fellow students improve their lives. It has a nice balance between humor and seriousness and Furuya does a great job in telling a story with a "hero" that's not just unlikable but an out-an-out prick. It's quite a fun concept, but I don't think delivered quite as well as it could be. I can put my finger on exactly what's missing here, there is something that's not quite working for me. Some teens will pick this up just because it's been running in Shonen Jump, but I don't see this one being immensely popular.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    2.5 Overall. The storyline was okay. Unique at first, but I also got the feeling it was heading into something extremely repetitive. By the end of this first volume, I was right. The art, however, was different, for which I give the author props. The actual characters were not quite.. um, attractive (If nobody told me Hikari Hamura was a boy, I wouldn't have known. Hello, eyelashes!). I really enjoyed the Art art (if you read this series, you'll understand). When Picasso draws what he sees in pe 2.5 Overall. The storyline was okay. Unique at first, but I also got the feeling it was heading into something extremely repetitive. By the end of this first volume, I was right. The art, however, was different, for which I give the author props. The actual characters were not quite.. um, attractive (If nobody told me Hikari Hamura was a boy, I wouldn't have known. Hello, eyelashes!). I really enjoyed the Art art (if you read this series, you'll understand). When Picasso draws what he sees in people's hearts - that art was great. Stark and realistic, and just the slightest bit twisted. The author has a good sense of imagery and a nice imagination. I just wish the story moved somewhere, instead of being so "chunky."

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    10/10 I really enjoyed his book very much. I love the story how its but out and it makes everything interest and makes y want to read more of the story. I love the art work in the graphic novel. I mostly love this book because this can relate to me in many ways, i am an artist and i love to draw from my heart and i always care about people always wonder what its like inside their heart and wish i could help that person. Sometimes when someone is say i like to draw a picture for them and make them 10/10 I really enjoyed his book very much. I love the story how its but out and it makes everything interest and makes y want to read more of the story. I love the art work in the graphic novel. I mostly love this book because this can relate to me in many ways, i am an artist and i love to draw from my heart and i always care about people always wonder what its like inside their heart and wish i could help that person. Sometimes when someone is say i like to draw a picture for them and make them feel better.... so yea i really love this book, I strongly recommend this book for students who are interested in graphic novels and manga books

  28. 5 out of 5

    Leigh Anne

    Darkly-cute manga about a boy who should've died in a freak accident...except that the friend who DID die made a deal with the gods to spare his life. Of course, to stay alive, he has to do good deeds. And since he's an artist, said good deeds involve his newfound ability to read people's hearts, draw them, and figure out what they truly need. Not as gothy as it sounds, surprisingly - it's actually quite funny. It is a bit of a one-trick pony, though, or so it seems - I'll try another volume or Darkly-cute manga about a boy who should've died in a freak accident...except that the friend who DID die made a deal with the gods to spare his life. Of course, to stay alive, he has to do good deeds. And since he's an artist, said good deeds involve his newfound ability to read people's hearts, draw them, and figure out what they truly need. Not as gothy as it sounds, surprisingly - it's actually quite funny. It is a bit of a one-trick pony, though, or so it seems - I'll try another volume or two just to see if I'm right.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Magenta Cooly

    I was really nervous when I bought this book. I mean I bought it on a whim; completely judging it buy its cover. And let me say, I'm glad I did! This is my first Shounen Jump manga, and I thought I wouldn't like it because of that (SJ entertainment being pointed more toward guys and all.) But what a great book! I was entertained every step of the way. It was funny too. I hope whoever gets it enjoys it just as much as I have. I was really nervous when I bought this book. I mean I bought it on a whim; completely judging it buy its cover. And let me say, I'm glad I did! This is my first Shounen Jump manga, and I thought I wouldn't like it because of that (SJ entertainment being pointed more toward guys and all.) But what a great book! I was entertained every step of the way. It was funny too. I hope whoever gets it enjoys it just as much as I have.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lora

    Well, this is like the first manga I've ever read (kinda sad, I know) so....... I'm not really sure how to rate or review this :/ I guess I enjoyed reading it (though backwards comic-book fashion does take some getting used to), but I have nothing to compare it to, so I don't really know if it was good or not......? So I'm just gonna go with a happy medium at three stars, and maybe write a better review for this when I'm a more experienced manga reader. Well, this is like the first manga I've ever read (kinda sad, I know) so....... I'm not really sure how to rate or review this :/ I guess I enjoyed reading it (though backwards comic-book fashion does take some getting used to), but I have nothing to compare it to, so I don't really know if it was good or not......? So I'm just gonna go with a happy medium at three stars, and maybe write a better review for this when I'm a more experienced manga reader.

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