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Each one of them has a tale to tell - thieves, harlots, godlings, and sorcerous beings living in the Shadows of Sanctuary. Following on from Thieves' World and Tales from the Vulgar Unicorn, seven top fantasy writers have written the stories of those who live and die in this infamous place. Join Lynn Abbey, Andrew Offutt, Vonda N. McIntyre and Janet Morris - but be warned: Each one of them has a tale to tell - thieves, harlots, godlings, and sorcerous beings living in the Shadows of Sanctuary. Following on from Thieves' World and Tales from the Vulgar Unicorn, seven top fantasy writers have written the stories of those who live and die in this infamous place. Join Lynn Abbey, Andrew Offutt, Vonda N. McIntyre and Janet Morris - but be warned: the world of Sanctuary is a dangerous one. Introduction Author: Robert Asprin Ischade Author: C.J. Cherryh A Gift in Parting Author: Robert Asprin The Vivisectionist Author: Andrew Offutt The Rhinoceros and the Unicorn Author: Diana L. Paxson Then Azyuna Danced Author: Lynn Abbey A Man and his God Author: Janet Morris Essay: Things the Editor Never Told Me Author: Lynn Abbey


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Each one of them has a tale to tell - thieves, harlots, godlings, and sorcerous beings living in the Shadows of Sanctuary. Following on from Thieves' World and Tales from the Vulgar Unicorn, seven top fantasy writers have written the stories of those who live and die in this infamous place. Join Lynn Abbey, Andrew Offutt, Vonda N. McIntyre and Janet Morris - but be warned: Each one of them has a tale to tell - thieves, harlots, godlings, and sorcerous beings living in the Shadows of Sanctuary. Following on from Thieves' World and Tales from the Vulgar Unicorn, seven top fantasy writers have written the stories of those who live and die in this infamous place. Join Lynn Abbey, Andrew Offutt, Vonda N. McIntyre and Janet Morris - but be warned: the world of Sanctuary is a dangerous one. Introduction Author: Robert Asprin Ischade Author: C.J. Cherryh A Gift in Parting Author: Robert Asprin The Vivisectionist Author: Andrew Offutt The Rhinoceros and the Unicorn Author: Diana L. Paxson Then Azyuna Danced Author: Lynn Abbey A Man and his God Author: Janet Morris Essay: Things the Editor Never Told Me Author: Lynn Abbey

30 review for Shadows of Sanctuary

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shaitarn

    I was torn as to whether to give this three stars or four, but in the end decided to be generous and round it up to four. This is probably my favourite of the Thieves’ World books – it’s certainly the one that’s stuck in my mind the most from when I first read these books many years ago – whether that’s because I didn’t get hold of the fourth book for years I’ve no idea. Following the now-familiar formula, there are seven stories as well as an introduction and closing essay. There are, perhaps, m I was torn as to whether to give this three stars or four, but in the end decided to be generous and round it up to four. This is probably my favourite of the Thieves’ World books – it’s certainly the one that’s stuck in my mind the most from when I first read these books many years ago – whether that’s because I didn’t get hold of the fourth book for years I’ve no idea. Following the now-familiar formula, there are seven stories as well as an introduction and closing essay. There are, perhaps, more ‘known’ authors in this book – C J Cherryh and Diana Paxson both make their Thieves World debut in this book. My favourite stories from the collection were Ischade by C J Cherry about a sorceress with a deadly curse, The Vivisectionist, another of Offutt’s Shadowspawn tales, and Diana Paxson’s The Rhinoceros and the Unicorn, a surprisingly moral and thoughtful tale which probably lingered in my mind longer than the other tales. The other tales were all reasonably enjoyable; Janet Morris’ A man and His God, featuring her character Tempus was the worst of the lot in my opinion; to me it seemed long and rather tiresome, but I’m sure others loved it. As usual, this anthology is recommended to those who’d liked to try anthologies of fantasy more on the sword and sorcery end of the scale.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    The third anthology in the THIEVES' WORLD cycle goes a bit off the rails. I like Vonda McIntyre's work in general, but her touchy-feely opening piece barely feels congruent with the setting established in the previous two books. Andrew Offutt has the best dialogue and description in the anthology, but he doesn't seem to know when to stop; encounters that should take paragraphs take pages, and conversations trudge on endlessly long after the reader has been given the point. Janet Morris' closing The third anthology in the THIEVES' WORLD cycle goes a bit off the rails. I like Vonda McIntyre's work in general, but her touchy-feely opening piece barely feels congruent with the setting established in the previous two books. Andrew Offutt has the best dialogue and description in the anthology, but he doesn't seem to know when to stop; encounters that should take paragraphs take pages, and conversations trudge on endlessly long after the reader has been given the point. Janet Morris' closing piece is frustratingly over-written and puzzling. As for the rest, they range from mediocre to competent, with C.J. Cherryh's "Ischade" probably taking the prize for being the least pat and self-indulgent of the bunch. One of the most interesting aspects of the first two THIEVES' WORLD collections was a deliberate refusal to inflict editorial homogeny on the characterizations within the tales. A given character might be described as attractive, commanding, and competent in one story, and shallow, ineffective, or comical in the next. The net effect is verisimilitude rather than contradiction, a real sense of glimpsing these lives and times from a dozen different perspectives, not all of which are always fair or accurate. Yet in Shadows of Sanctuary even a loose sense of overall editorial cohesion is missing. The alleged meta-plot, the dark mystery (someone is killing Sanctuary's wizards while they sleep) running like a thread through the tales, is almost completely ignored until the very last story, when we're simply told after the fact who did it. Nobody in the book seems to care, and neither will you. I'm pretty sure I'll continue to the next volume in the sequence, but this one leaves me on my guard, hoping that Storm Season doesn't feel quite so random.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mrwitte

    I picked this book up eagerly looking for more of the thuggery & skulduggery I've come to slaveringly expect from Thieves' World books. I was bored and disappointed by the cavalcade of all-new characters who took up the first 75 pages with their seemingly endless touchy-feely horseshit in Vonda McIntyre's tiresome opening story. It's like I'm suddenly reading "Elfquest" or something. Since this is a collection of short stories like the other Thieves' World books, there's a chance it'll still pul I picked this book up eagerly looking for more of the thuggery & skulduggery I've come to slaveringly expect from Thieves' World books. I was bored and disappointed by the cavalcade of all-new characters who took up the first 75 pages with their seemingly endless touchy-feely horseshit in Vonda McIntyre's tiresome opening story. It's like I'm suddenly reading "Elfquest" or something. Since this is a collection of short stories like the other Thieves' World books, there's a chance it'll still pull it out and get great like the first two books in the series, but that first story really killed my interest and I've had to put the book down for now. Seriously, are these characters going to be here forever? I sure hope not. Update: I had nothing to fear. After picking up the book again and pounding through the rest of that first story the rest of the crew got back to their old tricks and started cheating and stabbing each other like they're supposed to. In fact, in case you're thinking of reading the collection, I think you could even skip the first story and not suffer much continuity confusion - that story is so out of left-field it doesn't even connect with the others in any real way so you can just leave it out.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Toby

    Most fantasy literature is pure escapism -- light, easy, black and white. Thieves' World instead features surprisingly complex characters (for a fantasy tale) with uncertain motivations. It's low, gritty, and not concerned with the matters of elves and men. As a mosaic novel (or linear anthology, or what-have-you), a TW book is a grab-bag of authors and stories. In this, the third volume of the 12-book series, there's a novella-length opener that seems to subvert the low-fantasy setting by intro Most fantasy literature is pure escapism -- light, easy, black and white. Thieves' World instead features surprisingly complex characters (for a fantasy tale) with uncertain motivations. It's low, gritty, and not concerned with the matters of elves and men. As a mosaic novel (or linear anthology, or what-have-you), a TW book is a grab-bag of authors and stories. In this, the third volume of the 12-book series, there's a novella-length opener that seems to subvert the low-fantasy setting by introducing non-humans and intelligent monsters. It felt out of place -- even in a fantasy world where, yes, there are sorcerers who cast spells, an erudite troll's sudden appearance can, ahem, break the spell. Worse, the climax of that story (a large carnival that's destroyed and in which men are killed) is never mentioned again by anyone in the rest of the book. Beyond this blemish, the rest of the volume is made up of stories by what looks like the core group of authors responsible for the rest of the run of the series; some new characters pop up and some old ones continue their arcs. One other complaint is Janet Morris's pet character, Tempus, a man who evidently doesn't belong in this world and desperately wants out (I think -- he is referred to as both having come through a dimensional gate and as having been born in the TW world). She overwrites everything, too. I suspect neither of them are going anywhere, though. Another nugget worth mentioning. In the first book of the series, Joe Haldeman had a story which featured his bartender character One-Thumb, and killed him off. This was evidently outside the spirit of cooperation among the TW writers, as editor Bob Asprin noted in the postscript of that book that it was a bit of a shock. Through the second book, many characters wondered about One-Thumb and where he might be; one shapeshifter character actually appeared as One-Thumb for some reason. Now, at the outset of the third book, One-Thumb is back (but Joe Haldeman is not), and Hakiem The Storyteller, who will buy a tale so as to spin it for profit later, calls One-Thumb's story stupid. That struck me as editorial voice, both bitchy and a little funny. All in all, let's say 2.5 stars, rounded up to 3.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    This collection improved with age (its and mine). I still think the first story is the weakest tale in the first three anthologies, and find the C. J. Cherryh story overlong and dull, but the book improves tremendously with Aspirin's Hemingway knockoff ("A Gift in Parting"). Andrew Offutt and Janet Morris were absolutely crucial to the structure and quality of the Thieves' World series as a whole, and both of them made high-quality contributions to this volume. My favorite story, though, has to This collection improved with age (its and mine). I still think the first story is the weakest tale in the first three anthologies, and find the C. J. Cherryh story overlong and dull, but the book improves tremendously with Aspirin's Hemingway knockoff ("A Gift in Parting"). Andrew Offutt and Janet Morris were absolutely crucial to the structure and quality of the Thieves' World series as a whole, and both of them made high-quality contributions to this volume. My favorite story, though, has to be Diana Paxson's peculiarly touching and moral "The Rhinoceros and the Unicorn", which would've improved any anthology in which it appeared: it's as good as a well-translated fable from Aesop.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mars

    Sanctuary, the anus of the empire. Where life is short and the points don't matter. It's yet another collection of short stories about the Thieves' World, but unlike many other similar anthologies practically everything here is awesome. Sanctuary, the anus of the empire. Where life is short and the points don't matter. It's yet another collection of short stories about the Thieves' World, but unlike many other similar anthologies practically everything here is awesome.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    You look at the arc of the stories and wonder at lost opportunities. Tales of the Vulgar Unicorn made the setting dynamic by introducing solid events in one story with references or repercussions in other stories. Here there is the suggestion of a story arc in the 'slayer of sorcerers' first mentioned in "Ischade", referenced in "Then Azyuna Danced", and paid off (sort of) in "A Man And His God", but the situation never hangs over the setting in any useful way. Enas Yorl's mention--and motivati You look at the arc of the stories and wonder at lost opportunities. Tales of the Vulgar Unicorn made the setting dynamic by introducing solid events in one story with references or repercussions in other stories. Here there is the suggestion of a story arc in the 'slayer of sorcerers' first mentioned in "Ischade", referenced in "Then Azyuna Danced", and paid off (sort of) in "A Man And His God", but the situation never hangs over the setting in any useful way. Enas Yorl's mention--and motivation--raises the interest of the reader, but the whole of it is only understood in a subplot to the final story, which is entirely unsatisfactory. The two characters of focus were Hanse Shadowspawn and Tempus, neither of which are interesting by themselves but become interesting through their use of multiple perspectives and authors, each having a take on the characters. That Hanse could be dashing and omnicompetent and fantastically dangerous in one story and unformed clay in others gives the character a texture that I don't think a single story or author could replicate. I never cared for Tempus the first time I read this series, and don't care for him now. His presence dominates stories yet he remains a cypher and not in a particularly compelling way. "Uncontrolled Id" is part of his personality and his abilities but is not something to have in an ensemble series also featuring character-driven stories about painters and fishermen. The thing about the Thieves' World collections that always bothered me was the Walter Velez covers--clearly European architecture, green men's clothing with metal studs on everything--with a setting that felt decidedly different.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Iain

    The Thieve's World series is really hitting its stride with this title. There's an excellent group of short stories, "A Gift in Parting," "The Vivisectionist," and "The Rhinoceros and the Unicorn," that are bookended by subpar titles. The first story is fine, but it's simply not Thieve's World, being neither grim nor meaningful. The final story, ugh, is so clumsily written. I would have stopped reading it after just a few pages if it wasn't so important to the overall story arc. But perhaps it wo The Thieve's World series is really hitting its stride with this title. There's an excellent group of short stories, "A Gift in Parting," "The Vivisectionist," and "The Rhinoceros and the Unicorn," that are bookended by subpar titles. The first story is fine, but it's simply not Thieve's World, being neither grim nor meaningful. The final story, ugh, is so clumsily written. I would have stopped reading it after just a few pages if it wasn't so important to the overall story arc. But perhaps it won't prove important after all. Thieve's World is nothing if not malleable. And like the best of anthologies, this one left me wanting to immediately read the next.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Brooke

    As with its predecessors in the 'Thieves' World' shared-world collections, some of the stories here are pretty good and some are not. Some of the writing is downright bad (Offut's 'The Vivisectionist, e.g.). By this third book in the series, we are getting more of a continued story feel and there is less of the new to take our interest. The stories feel more heavy-handed, as well, and even plodding. Still reasonably entertaining, especially if one is already invested in the the saga of Sanctuary, As with its predecessors in the 'Thieves' World' shared-world collections, some of the stories here are pretty good and some are not. Some of the writing is downright bad (Offut's 'The Vivisectionist, e.g.). By this third book in the series, we are getting more of a continued story feel and there is less of the new to take our interest. The stories feel more heavy-handed, as well, and even plodding. Still reasonably entertaining, especially if one is already invested in the the saga of Sanctuary, but otherwise somewhat take it or leave it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Barry Moraller

    It's like reading a deranged history/mythology mashup. I really enjoyed this volume, and the whole series so far. Some of the stories are not so great, but the whole thing evokes such a sense of place that I find myself lost in the world. It's like reading a deranged history/mythology mashup. I really enjoyed this volume, and the whole series so far. Some of the stories are not so great, but the whole thing evokes such a sense of place that I find myself lost in the world.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nora

    I enjoy this anthology and rated the last 2 books 5 stars. In this book the last story had a strange way about it, so it gave it a bit of bad taste at the end, which is why its getting 4 stars. It is still a good read and I will be reading more of the series.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    Too dark, and too much angst, for my taste. I liked the character development, though.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Ehinger

    Definately not PG rated and a dark setting, but I find the tales of the dark underbelly of the world very interesting. I like that even the heros of the story are flawed, often deeply.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Calbick

    Another excellent entry in the series!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Sanchez

    I'm really enjoying the thieves world anthology. I'm really enjoying the thieves world anthology.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    This was a good collection of stories from the most challenging place in the fantasy world.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chuck Ledger

    As was the case when I read this book years ago, I felt the stories were very uneven and not as good as the previous two.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Des

    Some of the tales were thrilling; some were downright puzzling. I'm still not sure what the Morris story was all about. It might just be me. Some of the tales were thrilling; some were downright puzzling. I'm still not sure what the Morris story was all about. It might just be me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    This volume in the series is the one that makes you want to keep going. Gods fighting and strange newcomers are just some of the storylines.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    I didn't like this anthology as well as the first two. I don't like Tempus, and he shows up in a lot of these stories. I didn't like this anthology as well as the first two. I don't like Tempus, and he shows up in a lot of these stories.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    I read this book and its companions back in the 1980s. The idea of a Shared World apparently started at one of the many scifi conventions that were popular in the 1980s. It was a novel concept. There had always been anthologies - short stories or novellas written by authors from the same genre writing about the same Theme. But there had never been anthologies based on the same Fantasy World. Thieves World is a world: " a city of outlaws and adventurers in a world of war and wizardry, peopled with I read this book and its companions back in the 1980s. The idea of a Shared World apparently started at one of the many scifi conventions that were popular in the 1980s. It was a novel concept. There had always been anthologies - short stories or novellas written by authors from the same genre writing about the same Theme. But there had never been anthologies based on the same Fantasy World. Thieves World is a world: " a city of outlaws and adventurers in a world of war and wizardry, peopled with colorful characters". What made these books work was the authors' characters all wandered in and out of the same taverns, encountered the same corruption, and once in awhile authors' borrowed one anothers characters for their story. It was clever. It worked. I need to confess, I am an avid reader. However, short stories HAVE not and ARE not my favorite writing format. As a rule, I am usually wanting more character development, more information than what a short story can give. But Thieves' World worked and worked well. I do not recall any other short stories I enjoyed more. The editors went on to publish 12 books. I personally stopped reading at about book 6. The concept started getting tired and the books were not as clever and exciting to me after #6. But seeing this being offered as a ebook is getting me excited again. I just might revisit Thieves World.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Redsteve

    This one has a somewhat smaller number of (in some cases longer) short stories, and is, like most collections, a mixed bag quality-wise. Typical of the Thieves' World books, Shadows of Sanctuary contains a range of stories, some components of the over-arching plots and others more "local color". I do like that not all the stories focus on heroes, sorcerers and the avatars of gods; "The Rhinoceros and the Unicorn" and "A gift in Parting", deal with "regular folks" (a painter and a fisherman). Hal This one has a somewhat smaller number of (in some cases longer) short stories, and is, like most collections, a mixed bag quality-wise. Typical of the Thieves' World books, Shadows of Sanctuary contains a range of stories, some components of the over-arching plots and others more "local color". I do like that not all the stories focus on heroes, sorcerers and the avatars of gods; "The Rhinoceros and the Unicorn" and "A gift in Parting", deal with "regular folks" (a painter and a fisherman). Half of the stories in the book focus more or less on Tempus, who is far from being my favorite TW character, but do help progress some major plots of the series. This is also the first book in the series to feature CJ Cherryh's Ischade and Mradhon Vis, who, while interesting characters, still add to my conviction that Cherryh is better at writing engaging and sympathetic aliens then she is with humans. I was not a fan of "Looking For Satan"; the adventure of strangers from a utopian land coming to Sanctuary seemed very out of place in a gritty fantasy universe. There is a point to showing good-hearted people in TW (if only to throw some real contrast on the true blackhearted bastards), but I felt that McIntyre was laying it on a bit thick.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ensiform

    An engaging collection of dark and brutal stories of Sanctuary. My favorite collection so far, I think. Vonda McIntyre’s story about angel-like outsiders in Sanctuary highlights what a hell-hole the place is; Diana Paxson’s tale of a painter given the gift of depicting souls is a solid Sanctuary fairy-tale with a nice ending; Janet Morris’ continuation of her Tempus story, well-paced and suspenseful, even sheds some light on the earlier one which I found so dense and obscure; and Lynn Abbey’s Te An engaging collection of dark and brutal stories of Sanctuary. My favorite collection so far, I think. Vonda McIntyre’s story about angel-like outsiders in Sanctuary highlights what a hell-hole the place is; Diana Paxson’s tale of a painter given the gift of depicting souls is a solid Sanctuary fairy-tale with a nice ending; Janet Morris’ continuation of her Tempus story, well-paced and suspenseful, even sheds some light on the earlier one which I found so dense and obscure; and Lynn Abbey’s Tempus story uses the character’s curse in an interesting way. Abbey’s end note highlights some of the problems with the series, such as the jumble of money, architecture, and culture that the supposedly shared world Thieves’ World is without putting any weight on those problems at all. Sure, it’s just a fantasy experiment, but isn’t something worth publishing worth trying to do right? Oh well.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Raymond Rugg

    Shadows of Sanctuary is the third anthology in the series, with stories by Thieves’ World veterans Asprin, Offut, Abbey, and Morris, and new-to-the-series Vonda N. McIntyre, C. J. Cherryh, and Diana L. Paxson. Perhaps learning from the past, Asprin begins this collection with a story about one of Thieves’ Worlds’ more interesting characters, Marion Zimmer Bradley’s Lythande. Shadows also includes another story by Offut that reinforces my opinion that he is incapable of writing a bad story for thi Shadows of Sanctuary is the third anthology in the series, with stories by Thieves’ World veterans Asprin, Offut, Abbey, and Morris, and new-to-the-series Vonda N. McIntyre, C. J. Cherryh, and Diana L. Paxson. Perhaps learning from the past, Asprin begins this collection with a story about one of Thieves’ Worlds’ more interesting characters, Marion Zimmer Bradley’s Lythande. Shadows also includes another story by Offut that reinforces my opinion that he is incapable of writing a bad story for this series. A number of the tales are Tempus stories, with several of our other recurring characters also making appearances. By virtue of Tempus’ unique relationship with the god Vashanka, these stories also bring us back toward the storyline of the competing deities, and help us to look forward to new developments in the fourth book. All in all, Shadows is the strongest book amongst the first three publications.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Jeanette

    This was my first taste of the Thieves World series. On a whole, I liked it. Some reviewers hated the first story, and that's the one that sucked me in. Apparently it's somewhat of a departure from the usual tone of Thieves World stories. There were a couple stories that I didn't care for, but overall it was a fun fluffy read. As a side note, I really like the concept behind the series. Each author adds to and shapes the world with each story that's written. There's an afterward in this particul This was my first taste of the Thieves World series. On a whole, I liked it. Some reviewers hated the first story, and that's the one that sucked me in. Apparently it's somewhat of a departure from the usual tone of Thieves World stories. There were a couple stories that I didn't care for, but overall it was a fun fluffy read. As a side note, I really like the concept behind the series. Each author adds to and shapes the world with each story that's written. There's an afterward in this particular book where Lynn Abbey talks about what it's been like to write in such a collaborative way. It's a fun idea. I'm not sure if I'll read more of the books in the series, but I might if the mood strikes.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    I loved this book as much as I did the second in this series. One reason, which I forgot to mention when I reviewed (barely) the other two books is that these were unique in which the writers or editors, such as Robert Asprin and Lynn Abbey actually included essays as the last part of these books. The hows and whys of what they did, what the petition to be allowed to do, and the boundaries the hammered against to get certain things allowed in. They also provide lots of detail for background behi I loved this book as much as I did the second in this series. One reason, which I forgot to mention when I reviewed (barely) the other two books is that these were unique in which the writers or editors, such as Robert Asprin and Lynn Abbey actually included essays as the last part of these books. The hows and whys of what they did, what the petition to be allowed to do, and the boundaries the hammered against to get certain things allowed in. They also provide lots of detail for background behind Thieves World and some answers to questions that readers had. I really thought this was a really unique way to connect with the humble reader, such as I. I will never forget the effort they went to in these books to go a small extra step for us. Danny

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Readability 8. Rating 6. Date estimated. One of the Thieves' World series of books, which collect short stories from a range of science-fiction and fantasy writers. The interesting aspect of these stories is the common setting (the City of Sanctuary) and the overlapping of characters and events. At it's best, the series provides multiple viewpoints in very different styles of events that impact each character's life to varying extents. The series also does an excellent job of maintaining a histo Readability 8. Rating 6. Date estimated. One of the Thieves' World series of books, which collect short stories from a range of science-fiction and fantasy writers. The interesting aspect of these stories is the common setting (the City of Sanctuary) and the overlapping of characters and events. At it's best, the series provides multiple viewpoints in very different styles of events that impact each character's life to varying extents. The series also does an excellent job of maintaining a historical flow throughout the series. At this point (I am writing this well after the time I read the books), I cannot differentiate among the early books in this series. Note also, that this is the second reading for the first eight in the series.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kit Campbell

    This is the third of the Thieves' World anthologies. It is a communal world with communal characters, with participating authors adding to the lore and worldbuilding with each story. This is a good assortment of stories, and the authors have started to pull events from earlier volumes (and even other stories within this same volume) to begin an overaching plot, which is no small feat with the amount of people working on this. I would recommend you read Thieves' World and Tales from the Vulgar Unic This is the third of the Thieves' World anthologies. It is a communal world with communal characters, with participating authors adding to the lore and worldbuilding with each story. This is a good assortment of stories, and the authors have started to pull events from earlier volumes (and even other stories within this same volume) to begin an overaching plot, which is no small feat with the amount of people working on this. I would recommend you read Thieves' World and Tales from the Vulgar Unicorn before this so you are familiar with the world of Sanctuary and what's happening there.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brian Schwartz

    Shadows of Sanctuary contained the finest writing of the first three volumes of the Thieves World series. It also contained the two worst stories of the collection. Poor writing coupled with little or no editing took what could have been an outstanding collection of short stories and made it average. One cannot help but notice the stature of the writers selected for the volumes declining. The likes of Mercedes Lackey, Theodore Sturgeon and Joe Haldeman have given way to the likes of Robert Asprin Shadows of Sanctuary contained the finest writing of the first three volumes of the Thieves World series. It also contained the two worst stories of the collection. Poor writing coupled with little or no editing took what could have been an outstanding collection of short stories and made it average. One cannot help but notice the stature of the writers selected for the volumes declining. The likes of Mercedes Lackey, Theodore Sturgeon and Joe Haldeman have given way to the likes of Robert Asprin, Lynn Abbey, and the hapless Janet Morris.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rich Brown

    Read the first two of these in middle school; found a stack (vol's 3 - 6) at the Paperback Rack for 50 cents each and thought I'd finish off the series. (Now I realize there are 12 or 14 of them...) Throwaway swords-and-magic stuff, but much better than average, thanks to the varied styles of the collaborators. Read the first two of these in middle school; found a stack (vol's 3 - 6) at the Paperback Rack for 50 cents each and thought I'd finish off the series. (Now I realize there are 12 or 14 of them...) Throwaway swords-and-magic stuff, but much better than average, thanks to the varied styles of the collaborators.

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