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The Art Book For Children

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This children's edition of one of the most recognizable art books ever published includes masterpieces ranging from da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" to the art of Andy Warhol, facts and figures about the artists and their work, and more. Full color.


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This children's edition of one of the most recognizable art books ever published includes masterpieces ranging from da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" to the art of Andy Warhol, facts and figures about the artists and their work, and more. Full color.

30 review for The Art Book For Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kelli

    Both this and the yellow book two are big books with no sense of order or flow but they present so many examples of art. My kids were wowed by the diverse examples and enthralled by the talking points and questions throughout. This is interactive and fun.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Brown

    The most engaging children’s art book series I have ever used with my kids. Ideal for elementary-aged children, or even older, if they haven’t had much art education.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    This book is full of anachronisms, offers very little context for the works it discusses, and varies widely in the age groups it seems to be addressing. It takes up a worthy project, and the works are well chosen, but the content seems like it was farmed out to people who have no background in art history at all. See especially the very iffy discussion of bronze casting on the page about Giacometti and the use of the word "obsession" to describe Hokusai's views of Fuji. Discussions of Edo period This book is full of anachronisms, offers very little context for the works it discusses, and varies widely in the age groups it seems to be addressing. It takes up a worthy project, and the works are well chosen, but the content seems like it was farmed out to people who have no background in art history at all. See especially the very iffy discussion of bronze casting on the page about Giacometti and the use of the word "obsession" to describe Hokusai's views of Fuji. Discussions of Edo period print making don't have to be all about the market for prints, but it's just ignorant to suggest that the series of views of Fuji came out of an obsession and not the marketability of series prints (like the views of the tokaido, etc). You also don't necessarily need to describe techniques to kids to get them to appreciate art, but if you're going to do it, do it right. The writers clearly don't understand the way that wood block prints were made (not one block per print, but one per color for each print), and they imply that sculpture in stone was traditional and bronze casting was something new and original that Giacometti figured out for himself. Tell that to the ancient Greeks. There are plenty of interesting age appropriate things to say about all of the works chosen. There is no need to cobble together bits of writing where the information is so fragmentary as to be ultimately misleading. Just because a book is intended for children doesn't mean you don't have to know what you're talking about.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Wow! Awesome compilation of art with lots of thought-provoking questions to help children learn to look at art and analyze it a little.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bec

    Lots of flashy pictures, not much in the way of practical fun

  6. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    A wonderful introduction to the expansive world of art through the works of thirty artists. Simple, interesting and informative text accompany the works of art. Each artist is introduced through fun titles that mimic some aspect of their work. For instance, Cindy Sherman's section is entitled "Dressing Up," in reference to the wide array of characters she transforms into for her trademark photographs. Each artist's works also include engaging questions, such as the Vincent Van Gogh inspired, "Ho A wonderful introduction to the expansive world of art through the works of thirty artists. Simple, interesting and informative text accompany the works of art. Each artist is introduced through fun titles that mimic some aspect of their work. For instance, Cindy Sherman's section is entitled "Dressing Up," in reference to the wide array of characters she transforms into for her trademark photographs. Each artist's works also include engaging questions, such as the Vincent Van Gogh inspired, "How do you sign your paintings?" (He signed his with "Vincent".) The dates of the works aren't listed until the end of the book, which would be problematic except for the fact that the book is introductory in scope. An appropriate introduction to the art world for all ages, and a must for elementary and middle school libraries. I plan to read this to the children in my life!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    My search for an art book for my kids ends here. At 75 pages, this book is substantial, has great images and is child-appropriate. I also like the way the (unnamed) author involves the reader in the art, asking children to use their imagination to wonder about why artists created things they way they did.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    Didn't care for this as much as other art books I've looked at that were "all-inclusive" Seemed random, though it asked really good questions about each art piece. It makes you think, but isn't outlined and presented as a whole understanding of art. (discussion more oriented for older little kids...not 4-6 year olds)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dick Stapleton

    Yup: kids' book! I add it because it caught my eye at a tag sale, I started flipping through, and bought it and read/viewed it. I'm hardly new to enjoying art but I expect I will look differently hereon.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adrian R

    I read this to my children. Absolutely brilliant. Each chapter is just a few paragraphs and explains the artists methods, intent and work succinctly and in a way that is easy for a four year old to understand.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Phoebe Marvelcomics

    Full of some really nice ideas to help children access and think about famous art works and artists.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    Great book, but disappointed that only 2 out of the 30 artists are women.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lovegreentea

    Excellent introduction. Bought for a friend's child as a gift, and ended up reading it before giving it away. Recommended age: 8+ (?)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie

    Really imaginative and creative way of discussing influential. The tone is conversational but doesn't talk down to kids or over their heads.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Landis-Steward

  16. 4 out of 5

    Paula Healy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan Arms

  20. 4 out of 5

    So Span

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Watts

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sara Caunce

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mary Siracusa

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

  26. 4 out of 5

    Murphy Waggoner

  27. 5 out of 5

    Olia

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Kirillov

  29. 5 out of 5

    Claire Knowles

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon

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