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The Art of the Heist: Confessions of a Master Thief

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“A gripping tell-all….A fascinating look inside the mind of an unrepentant criminal.” —Washington Post “One of the most beguiling criminal memoirs ever written….A rare gem of a book.” —T. J. English, New York Times bestselling author of Havana Nocturne   America’s most notorious art thief, Boston-based Myles Connor, tells the unapologetic true story of his life of crime in The “A gripping tell-all….A fascinating look inside the mind of an unrepentant criminal.” —Washington Post “One of the most beguiling criminal memoirs ever written….A rare gem of a book.” —T. J. English, New York Times bestselling author of Havana Nocturne   America’s most notorious art thief, Boston-based Myles Connor, tells the unapologetic true story of his life of crime in The Art of the Heist. Co-written with acclaimed author Jenny Siler, Connor’s eye-opening memoirs offer readers a rare, detailed, and intimate look into the mindset of a master criminal—a cat burglar, thief, and con man, veteran of numerous brazen museum heists, who shares the unparalleled “rush” of a life lived on the far side of the law.


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“A gripping tell-all….A fascinating look inside the mind of an unrepentant criminal.” —Washington Post “One of the most beguiling criminal memoirs ever written….A rare gem of a book.” —T. J. English, New York Times bestselling author of Havana Nocturne   America’s most notorious art thief, Boston-based Myles Connor, tells the unapologetic true story of his life of crime in The “A gripping tell-all….A fascinating look inside the mind of an unrepentant criminal.” —Washington Post “One of the most beguiling criminal memoirs ever written….A rare gem of a book.” —T. J. English, New York Times bestselling author of Havana Nocturne   America’s most notorious art thief, Boston-based Myles Connor, tells the unapologetic true story of his life of crime in The Art of the Heist. Co-written with acclaimed author Jenny Siler, Connor’s eye-opening memoirs offer readers a rare, detailed, and intimate look into the mindset of a master criminal—a cat burglar, thief, and con man, veteran of numerous brazen museum heists, who shares the unparalleled “rush” of a life lived on the far side of the law.

30 review for The Art of the Heist: Confessions of a Master Thief

  1. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    The Art of the Heist was written by Connor with help from a real writer. Hard to keep going--I kept skimming, hoping to find passages which were not full of pompous bloviation on the part of Connor. The blurbs are really misleading, almost bait and switch, since Connor is the supposed prime suspect for the Gardner heist, as the publisher keeps shouting at us, but the book only covers a short period in the 70s--ten years or so before the 1990 heist. So, he never really says he did it, one of the The Art of the Heist was written by Connor with help from a real writer. Hard to keep going--I kept skimming, hoping to find passages which were not full of pompous bloviation on the part of Connor. The blurbs are really misleading, almost bait and switch, since Connor is the supposed prime suspect for the Gardner heist, as the publisher keeps shouting at us, but the book only covers a short period in the 70s--ten years or so before the 1990 heist. So, he never really says he did it, one of the implied promises of the book jacket. I gave up after trying to get into this book twice. Connor's braggadocio about his criminal "feats", not to mention all the stolen art he owns, gets old real quick. Any storyteller who has to keep reminding the reader how smart he is, while not being able to write his own book, and who has spent the majority of his adult life in prison after being caught time after time for art theft, needs a reality check.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kara Babcock

    Almost a year ago (has it been that long? gah) I read Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled Off the World’s Greatest Art Heist . As you will know, I am a sucker for heist stories. That book led me to The Art of the Heist: Confessions of a Master Art Thief, Rock-and-Roller, and Prodigal Son. Myles Connor was (still is) a primary suspect in the Gardner heist, despite the fact he was in jail at the time. Although Connor and coauthor Jenny Siler discuss aspects of the heist (from a pure Almost a year ago (has it been that long? gah) I read Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled Off the World’s Greatest Art Heist . As you will know, I am a sucker for heist stories. That book led me to The Art of the Heist: Confessions of a Master Art Thief, Rock-and-Roller, and Prodigal Son. Myles Connor was (still is) a primary suspect in the Gardner heist, despite the fact he was in jail at the time. Although Connor and coauthor Jenny Siler discuss aspects of the heist (from a purely hypothetical standpoint), the bulk of this book traces Connor’s origins as a thief, bank robber, and art collector. At times captivating and at other times too sugarcoated for my tastes, The Art of the Heist tries to convince you there is such a thing as a thief with a heart of gold. Whether or not you agree comes down to your stomach for an unreliable narrator, tales that might be taller than they are deep, and how much you—like me—love a good heist story. It is refreshing to hear about heists from the mouth of someone who pulled them rather than a journalist or a former investigator. Setting aside questions of sympathy and credibility, I definitely enjoyed listening to Connor spin his tales. He puts different emphasis on his jobs than a detective might, and that makes for very interesting reading. He describes his thefts in practical terms, admitting that sometimes what he stole was influenced simply by whether or not he could get it out of the building. Connor also describes the way allegiances shift depending on self-interest or differences of opinion over how to handle a crime. He parallels this with the shifting allegiances and loyalties within law enforcement. As television shows remind us (even as law enforcement tries to minimize it), inter-agency rivalry is a big source of tension. It was interesting to see various detectives, police officers, and lawyers lining up to try to get a piece of Connor or even work with Connor’s interests if it aligned with their own priorities. The Art of the Heist reminds me somewhat of Making a Murderer. This might seem strange, in that I haven’t actually watched the latter—but I’ve read enough reviews of it to understand what its makers have tried to do. Both of these shine a light on critical flaws in the criminal justice system, flaws that allow innocent people to be framed and railroaded for crimes while guilty people go free. The Canadian system is no picnic and probably too close to the American system for comfort, but at least we don’t do stupid things like have elected judges and district attorneys. Seriously, America: why?? Connor corroborates what other sources have long said: at every level, the system that is supposed to protect us from criminals while also rehabilitate them pretty much just exists to sustain itself, to generate profit, and to let law enforcement do what it wants. From transferring Connor to a facility where they hope he will be murdered by the other inmates to framing him for murders with the help of lying witnesses, certain law enforcement agents give that entire sector a bad name. For that alone I’m glad I read The Art of the Heist. I’m less enthusiastic about Connor’s voice. The writing isn’t bad, but he doesn’t manage to charm me the way he so obviously wants to. I’m a pretty big bleeding heart liberal, and I’ll be the first to admit I think a lot of “criminals” are simply people caught up circumstances thrust upon them by a harsh and oppressive system. Yet Connor’s constant reminders that he doesn’t like people getting hurt, that he’s only stealing this art because he really wants it, that he’s oh-so-intelligent but just misunderstood by a society hung up on ideas of personal property … these all ring hollow. He might consider art theft a victimless crime, in the sense that he tries not to hurt people in the process and he steals from institutions that are insured or families rich enough to take the financial hits. But he also freely admits to trafficking in cocaine and heroin. Because that stuff is totally victimless too, right? I believe Connor believes he is an “honourable thief” but I can’t really apply that label to him. And while I wouldn’t call him an outright liar, it’s important to view this book as one with an ultimately unreliable narrator: he wants to come off looking good, so take that into consideration. Reliable or no, Connor’s voice provides another interesting perspective on the world of Boston crime, art theft, and the justice system. Although not as engrossing as I had hoped, The Art of the Heist was at least informative and often interesting.

  3. 5 out of 5

    G

    OK, a bit of background first. I am a sucker for a good heist story. I am a double sucker for a true crime heist story. I love loveable con men, and rougish yet brilliant thieves who walk away with a pile of cash or a Monet that used to belong to some rich ass hole. I don’t really like the Ann Rule sort of true crime- crazy killers killing in a crazy way. I see crazy people at work all the time. They do not fascinate me as much as crafty people do. I like my criminals more Thomas Crown or Doug S OK, a bit of background first. I am a sucker for a good heist story. I am a double sucker for a true crime heist story. I love loveable con men, and rougish yet brilliant thieves who walk away with a pile of cash or a Monet that used to belong to some rich ass hole. I don’t really like the Ann Rule sort of true crime- crazy killers killing in a crazy way. I see crazy people at work all the time. They do not fascinate me as much as crafty people do. I like my criminals more Thomas Crown or Doug Street, less Hannibal Lector or Lyle Mendez. So I read “The Art of The Heist” by Myles J Conner. http://www.amazon.com/Art-Heist-Confe.... It chronicles the story of Connor’s life from the mid 60s through the early 80s. When he wasn’t involved in crime, or in jail, Mr. Conner was/ is a guitarist and band leader. Whether this is a cause of, or effect of his enormous ego I’m still not sure. He is, by all accounts (all of HIS accounts,) an excellent and skilled art thief. So far, so good. The parts of the story that talk about art theft, and the sale of stolen art are very engaging. The problem with his story is that he is also an admitted drug smuggler, a cop shooter, and thug. I am not sure if he is a bad person who’s one “redeeming” quality is that he is a skilled art thief. Or if the sad truth is, all those other loveable rogues are also involved in criminal endeavors that mix them up with drug dealers, the mafia, and general thuggary, but they have the good sense not to talk about it. He spends a lot of time in jail. His friends are killers, and goons. And he has little insight and no remorse re: his crimes and personal choices. I think that this book can serve as an excellent bromide for the geeks out there who walk around museums and check out camera placement, guard rotas etc. The folks with 9 to 5 jobs who dream about a life of international intrigue and high stakes crime. You won’t be David Niven. You won’t be Jim diGriz. You will be in jail, or dead. Not a great book, but a good message. .

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Dad HATED this one! The guy thought he was SSOO cool and apparently it was pretty sickening.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I was hoping this was going to be a real life Ocean's Thirteen or The Italian Job. You know, good looking people who are carrying out a heist because some really bad person has it coming. Unfortunately, crime in real life is not like crime in the movies. Nobody is attractive, all the sociopathic tendencies are front and center and the characters are all repellent, violent jerks instead of suave, funny, smooth-talkers. The man at the center of this story is possibly the most odious, hateful, foul I was hoping this was going to be a real life Ocean's Thirteen or The Italian Job. You know, good looking people who are carrying out a heist because some really bad person has it coming. Unfortunately, crime in real life is not like crime in the movies. Nobody is attractive, all the sociopathic tendencies are front and center and the characters are all repellent, violent jerks instead of suave, funny, smooth-talkers. The man at the center of this story is possibly the most odious, hateful, foul piece of garbage excuse for a human being born in New England at any time in the last century. He, of course, thinks that he is a stand-up guy who was just doling out revenge to the upper classes. Their crime? Treating him as a member of the lower class. Avoid this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rosie Beck

    I expected more from this bio of master art thief Myles J Connor, but he just didn't deliver. Needed a ghost writer to help punch up what probably was a remarkable life. I expected more from this bio of master art thief Myles J Connor, but he just didn't deliver. Needed a ghost writer to help punch up what probably was a remarkable life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Magda

    You'd have known if it was me. I would have taken the Titian. But drawn to each other by our mutual love of animals and by a shared interest in martial arts, we quickly became friends. You'd have known if it was me. I would have taken the Titian. But drawn to each other by our mutual love of animals and by a shared interest in martial arts, we quickly became friends.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Miles is a bit off a show off. It's hard to believe that this is all true. I did enjoy all the mentions of local spots. And yes i did go to the Gardener Museum after finishing!! Miles is a bit off a show off. It's hard to believe that this is all true. I did enjoy all the mentions of local spots. And yes i did go to the Gardener Museum after finishing!!

  9. 4 out of 5

    James Vachowski

    For a guy who claims to have been a "master art thief", the author sure did spend a lot of time in prison... For a guy who claims to have been a "master art thief", the author sure did spend a lot of time in prison...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Larry Hostetler

    This was an interesting and quick read, if you like true crime books. The author and thief writes in an engaging manner. But my objection with the book is that it is much more about his trials and time in prison than about art, thievery, and rock and roll. The corruption of law enforcement in the 70s and 80s in Boston and Massachusetts may or may not be overstated, but it is certainly presented plausibly. I would have much more appreciated more on his learning and appreciation of art, on his tim This was an interesting and quick read, if you like true crime books. The author and thief writes in an engaging manner. But my objection with the book is that it is much more about his trials and time in prison than about art, thievery, and rock and roll. The corruption of law enforcement in the 70s and 80s in Boston and Massachusetts may or may not be overstated, but it is certainly presented plausibly. I would have much more appreciated more on his learning and appreciation of art, on his time with an alias as an expert on art, and on the planning and carrying out of the heists, including some personal perspective on "the art of the heist" as the title suggests. It was not what I'd hoped, and yet was not bad. Three stars fits. I liked it but was a bit disappointed.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Casey Robinson

    An enjoyable read, but it bogs at times and Myles spends an awful lot of time letting you know just exactly how awesome he is. Show don't tell, mah dude. An enjoyable read, but it bogs at times and Myles spends an awful lot of time letting you know just exactly how awesome he is. Show don't tell, mah dude.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David Morrison

    One of my favorite true crime books!

  13. 4 out of 5

    elstaffe

    This was fascinating. So much so that I kept accidentally staying up past my bedtime to find out what happened next. Review, then: absorbing book, do not read if trying to fall asleep.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mia Schuler

    A very interesting book on the mind of a criminal.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eugene Cordell

    Great read! I found the author's narrative thought-out, and surprisingly charming. Enjoy the heists, and regret the friendships. A casual read for True Crime enthusiasts. Great read! I found the author's narrative thought-out, and surprisingly charming. Enjoy the heists, and regret the friendships. A casual read for True Crime enthusiasts.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Poquette

    Picked it up at a library book sale. Took me a long time to get through. Wasn't as good as I had hoped. Picked it up at a library book sale. Took me a long time to get through. Wasn't as good as I had hoped.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    What an insufferable bastard! I had an incredible time reading this

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christina Boyle

    First off - the writer who did the interviews and put into narrative all these insane stories from Myles Connor is a hero and an incredible writer. But I have to say - my overriding thought while reading the stories is the same thought that I have when I see teens spout a fountain of knowledge about arcane material about a video game .... what if they applied all that passion to learning Mandarin or ... higher math .... or learning the art of negotiations for hostage retrieval. ... or really anyt First off - the writer who did the interviews and put into narrative all these insane stories from Myles Connor is a hero and an incredible writer. But I have to say - my overriding thought while reading the stories is the same thought that I have when I see teens spout a fountain of knowledge about arcane material about a video game .... what if they applied all that passion to learning Mandarin or ... higher math .... or learning the art of negotiations for hostage retrieval. ... or really anything more useful than learning the video game. Tragic. Waste. Of. Mental and Physical Resources. And we all pay for this collectively as a society. It's difficult to not react to the actual content of the story. I bought the book because I was in love with fine arts in college and spent a lot of time in the MFA and more secondarily in the Gardiner Museum and wanted to know what the heck happened that led to the cruel robbing of the Gardiner Museum. I was crushed when I heard that it was robbed. Who would do such a thing. To deprive others of the opportunity to learn and appreciate fine art seems so ultimately self-serving, regardless of whatever flawed motives. Apparently the motives were generally youthful rebellion, class struggle and thumbing the nose at the authority figure. But this line of reasoning gets pretty old by the time you are over the age of 30 and are still robbing banks. My god - the protagonist was in his 50s and still robbing and dealing. The book was well written because I guess it served its intended purpose of laying out the crime stories in vivid details. I felt sickened and dizzy and upset reading about the neanderthals to whom Myles Connor stooped to consorting in order to pull off his heists. The fact that he had to deal with other horrible morally questionable things made it seem all the worse. And it was galling that he spent his personal energy and resources - inadvertantly or overtly - not sure - enabling dumb-crap people to have a job exploiting others. Even more upsetting that he squandered his intelligence on a career of crime. Maybe not a lot of redeeming value in his story. But it was interesting. I guess if there a secondary conclusion besides his point of view it is this: don't own nice stuff because there are thugs and dumb-crap people who will see it and come to your house and steal it from you because they are jealous or need money.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patrick O'Neil

    There are certain rules to bragging rights. When you've done something really cool, totally outrageous, insane or unbelievable – you've the right to a little boasting. Hell, a lot of boasting actually. Then of course there's the clause that the more unbelievable, outrageous, or insane the bragging is, the better the story, so really go for it and write a tell all memoir. And while telling unlikely tales is something most memoirs are accused of these days, one such unbelievable story is The Art o There are certain rules to bragging rights. When you've done something really cool, totally outrageous, insane or unbelievable – you've the right to a little boasting. Hell, a lot of boasting actually. Then of course there's the clause that the more unbelievable, outrageous, or insane the bragging is, the better the story, so really go for it and write a tell all memoir. And while telling unlikely tales is something most memoirs are accused of these days, one such unbelievable story is The Art of the Heist – only it's all true. Myles J. Connor Jr. – former rock star, art thief, art collector, member of Mensa, martial arts practitioner, and self-proclaimed tough guy, with the help of co-author Jenny Siler – does a lot of bragging. Together they lay out, in detail, the numerous museum art heists, bank robberies, and strong arm exploits that Connor either participated in, or masterminded, in the greater New England area back in the mid-1960's through the 70's. This included the Boston Children’s Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and the Smithsonian Institute in Washington. But it's the unsolved 1990 robbery of Boston's Isabella Stewart GardnerMuseum, where two men dressed as police officers made off with works of art by Rembrandt, Degas, and Vermeer – valued at $300 million – that garnered Connor the most attention. However he was already behind bars when the theft occurred. Yet that hasn't stopped him from saying he knows who did the robbery. He claims to have been there when the culprit cased the museum, and really all he wants to do is set the record straight... To read the rest of this review, please follow the link to The Sylvan Echo Vol. 2, Issue 3 - Book Review page.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wayland Smith

    I will admit, I didn't care for this book. Reading about Connor relating his life story, one thought I returned to again and again was he never found himself in a situation which he couldn't make worse. Connor has the combination of cockiness, vengefulness, and the inability to take responsibility for his own actions that I've seen in many "career criminals." Yes, I'm in law enforcement, yes that may bias me. Somewhat improbably, Connor claims to be an art connoisseur, master thief, martial arts I will admit, I didn't care for this book. Reading about Connor relating his life story, one thought I returned to again and again was he never found himself in a situation which he couldn't make worse. Connor has the combination of cockiness, vengefulness, and the inability to take responsibility for his own actions that I've seen in many "career criminals." Yes, I'm in law enforcement, yes that may bias me. Somewhat improbably, Connor claims to be an art connoisseur, master thief, martial arts expert, and at least on the local level, rock and roll star. He commits crimes, and then complains that law enforcement is "picking on him." Just about everyone that opposes him is depicted as vicious, foolish, and spiteful. Of course, even while he goes to prison several times, he sticks by his code and won't inform on anyone, even while he has that happen to him several times. He gets irritated at others involving his family members, and yet he stores stolen property with lovers and friends. He skips out on the last day of a trial his team is winning, so, even though his side wins, he gets an additional charge. He moves from art thief, which some find to be a romantic ideal, to drug dealer. It's an interesting, if doubtful, story. It's well enough written, although very one sided on most fronts.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    I'm giving this one negative ten stars! This is the sad, pitiful tale of a thug whose ego and self agrandizing mannerisms are larger than the amount of treasures and banks he has robbed. Small in stature and weight, Miles hailed from a middle class family. His father a cop, his mother a good person. This guy's psychological condition could be a case study for counselors. I'm not one, but I'd venture to say that he is a sociopath with a hugely inflated sense of importance. Rubbing banks, stealing a I'm giving this one negative ten stars! This is the sad, pitiful tale of a thug whose ego and self agrandizing mannerisms are larger than the amount of treasures and banks he has robbed. Small in stature and weight, Miles hailed from a middle class family. His father a cop, his mother a good person. This guy's psychological condition could be a case study for counselors. I'm not one, but I'd venture to say that he is a sociopath with a hugely inflated sense of importance. Rubbing banks, stealing art works and emotionally ruining people seem to be about the social skill level of this guy. In my day and age I think he word to describe him would be "punk". Bragging about how great you are when so many were impacted simply isn't tolerable. Why this book was published is beyond me. I read most of it and then couldn't take it any more.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kerri

    This was one of those stories that pulled me in and I didn't want to stop until I knew each "what happens next." I had to give it 4 stars (knocked down from 5) for all the foul language, but with this guy's hard-core crime life it is absolutely authentic and not over-bearing. Really fun read - exactly the kind of "summer novel" people recommend, except it's NOT fiction. (I have to say that I even feel kind of bad for how things turned out for him, though he is clearly not wallowing in pity himse This was one of those stories that pulled me in and I didn't want to stop until I knew each "what happens next." I had to give it 4 stars (knocked down from 5) for all the foul language, but with this guy's hard-core crime life it is absolutely authentic and not over-bearing. Really fun read - exactly the kind of "summer novel" people recommend, except it's NOT fiction. (I have to say that I even feel kind of bad for how things turned out for him, though he is clearly not wallowing in pity himself.) This will definitely be made into a movie, like unto Catch Me If You Can.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    This should be called "Connor's Brag Book" or "Connor Recounts his Time in Prison." I was expecting a book that focused on how Connor carried out his art heists. I've read several books about art heists and they are all more interesting that this one. This guy spends so much of this book talking about his time in prison and his plans to get out. He also had a problem with law enforcement and couldn't not resist arrest. I felt like the art thefts and museums heists only made up a small part of th This should be called "Connor's Brag Book" or "Connor Recounts his Time in Prison." I was expecting a book that focused on how Connor carried out his art heists. I've read several books about art heists and they are all more interesting that this one. This guy spends so much of this book talking about his time in prison and his plans to get out. He also had a problem with law enforcement and couldn't not resist arrest. I felt like the art thefts and museums heists only made up a small part of the book. Pass.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Philip Cook

    I saw this book on sale for $6 and decided to take a shot. I was plesantly suprised, it was definatley worth the cost and then some. There were a couple of spots that seemed inaccurate; for example on one heist they are stealing 2 paintings that are worth $450K together then they decide to take a couple turn of the century clocks that are supposed to be priceless and they then say the total take was almost a half million dollars?? Other than a few of these type of "adjustments" it was a good rea I saw this book on sale for $6 and decided to take a shot. I was plesantly suprised, it was definatley worth the cost and then some. There were a couple of spots that seemed inaccurate; for example on one heist they are stealing 2 paintings that are worth $450K together then they decide to take a couple turn of the century clocks that are supposed to be priceless and they then say the total take was almost a half million dollars?? Other than a few of these type of "adjustments" it was a good read and a great story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    It feels wrong to say that this book was entertaining and enjoyable (he was a criminal after all) but it was. As a whole, Myles' life was a waste spent in and out of prison, which is kind of sad, but he wouldn't change much if he could. <> The book ends with this, "There is no scale on which to set the thrill of holding a Rembrandt in one's hands. No stick by which to measure the cheers of six hundred men in the Walpole prison auditorium. They say most people lead lives of quiet desperation. Min It feels wrong to say that this book was entertaining and enjoyable (he was a criminal after all) but it was. As a whole, Myles' life was a waste spent in and out of prison, which is kind of sad, but he wouldn't change much if he could. <> The book ends with this, "There is no scale on which to set the thrill of holding a Rembrandt in one's hands. No stick by which to measure the cheers of six hundred men in the Walpole prison auditorium. They say most people lead lives of quiet desperation. Mine, at least, has been anything but."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    The problem with reading a book written by a known liar and thief is that a lot of it is going to be very hard to believe. Myles Connor admits to bank robberies and museum thefts, but his insistence on being someone who objects to violence often sounds like the someone who doth protest too much. He paints himself as blameless as he can given his circumstances, and it doesn't sound very plausible. That said, the crimes Connor is accused of escalate from theft to double murder very quickly and it' The problem with reading a book written by a known liar and thief is that a lot of it is going to be very hard to believe. Myles Connor admits to bank robberies and museum thefts, but his insistence on being someone who objects to violence often sounds like the someone who doth protest too much. He paints himself as blameless as he can given his circumstances, and it doesn't sound very plausible. That said, the crimes Connor is accused of escalate from theft to double murder very quickly and it's definitely a strange ride.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    While the true part of this story is intriguing, I can't help but feel like it's poorly written. Maybe because it feels like being told a story by some guy in a bar. A little disjointed. A little long winded. And a little unbelievable. I may not finish this one...it takes a lot for me to drop a book halfway through but it's just a bunch of stories in a guys life. I don't feel like the main character is really overcoming challenges and will ultimately change. So no go for me. While the true part of this story is intriguing, I can't help but feel like it's poorly written. Maybe because it feels like being told a story by some guy in a bar. A little disjointed. A little long winded. And a little unbelievable. I may not finish this one...it takes a lot for me to drop a book halfway through but it's just a bunch of stories in a guys life. I don't feel like the main character is really overcoming challenges and will ultimately change. So no go for me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Margarita

    This read has to be taken with a grain of salt given Connor's criminal history. It would have been more interesting if he had explored the emotional/psychological side behing his crimes along with the motivations he had in having chosen this path. Although well written and ripe with eventful descriptions, it's hard to not cringe at Connor's bragging and enormous ego. Thankfully, the fluidity of his storytelling holds it together. This read has to be taken with a grain of salt given Connor's criminal history. It would have been more interesting if he had explored the emotional/psychological side behing his crimes along with the motivations he had in having chosen this path. Although well written and ripe with eventful descriptions, it's hard to not cringe at Connor's bragging and enormous ego. Thankfully, the fluidity of his storytelling holds it together.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Kornele

    For as smart as the author claims he is he seems to do a lot of illegal and dumb stuff. He also writes very arrogantly and the friends that he chooses to help him with his crimes are made out to be dumb as rocks. I did like the book a little though. I would definitely consider it a guide on what not to do with your life. I think most of the museums now are pretty well thief proof. At least I hope they are.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    This guy's ego creates a thick layer of slime over the entire text. If you can scrape it off, adjust to the fact that he's a crappy writer, get past the moralizing and boasting, and don't let your skepticism drag you away, then this is a really fun read. Generally enjoyed the "everybody's dirty" vibe. Too much time is spent trying to sound good, and he doesn't pull that off. A rare sort of romp, highly recommended with some salt. This guy's ego creates a thick layer of slime over the entire text. If you can scrape it off, adjust to the fact that he's a crappy writer, get past the moralizing and boasting, and don't let your skepticism drag you away, then this is a really fun read. Generally enjoyed the "everybody's dirty" vibe. Too much time is spent trying to sound good, and he doesn't pull that off. A rare sort of romp, highly recommended with some salt.

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