web site hit counter Education Nation: Six Leading Edges of Innovation in Our Schools - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Education Nation: Six Leading Edges of Innovation in Our Schools

Availability: Ready to download

An educational innovator who worked at Sesame Workshop and The George Lucas Educational Foundation offers a new vision for learning As a result of constant innovation, learning is no longer limited by traditional confines and we're moving beyond students tied to their chairs, desks, and textbooks-and teachers locked away in classrooms. In Education Nation author Milton Che An educational innovator who worked at Sesame Workshop and The George Lucas Educational Foundation offers a new vision for learning As a result of constant innovation, learning is no longer limited by traditional confines and we're moving beyond students tied to their chairs, desks, and textbooks-and teachers locked away in classrooms. In Education Nation author Milton Chen draws from extensive experience in media-from his work on Sesame Street in its nascent years to his role as executive director of the George Lucas Educational Foundation-to support a vision for a new world of learning. This book, in six chapters, explores the "edges" in education--the places where K-12 learning has already seen revolutionary changes through innovative reform and the use of technology. Examines ways in which learning can be revolutionized through innovative reform and the use of technology Explores the ever-expanding world of technology for breakthroughs in teaching and learning Includes many wonderful resources to support innovation in schools across the nation This important book offers a clear vision for tomorrow's classrooms that will enhance learning opportunities for all children.


Compare

An educational innovator who worked at Sesame Workshop and The George Lucas Educational Foundation offers a new vision for learning As a result of constant innovation, learning is no longer limited by traditional confines and we're moving beyond students tied to their chairs, desks, and textbooks-and teachers locked away in classrooms. In Education Nation author Milton Che An educational innovator who worked at Sesame Workshop and The George Lucas Educational Foundation offers a new vision for learning As a result of constant innovation, learning is no longer limited by traditional confines and we're moving beyond students tied to their chairs, desks, and textbooks-and teachers locked away in classrooms. In Education Nation author Milton Chen draws from extensive experience in media-from his work on Sesame Street in its nascent years to his role as executive director of the George Lucas Educational Foundation-to support a vision for a new world of learning. This book, in six chapters, explores the "edges" in education--the places where K-12 learning has already seen revolutionary changes through innovative reform and the use of technology. Examines ways in which learning can be revolutionized through innovative reform and the use of technology Explores the ever-expanding world of technology for breakthroughs in teaching and learning Includes many wonderful resources to support innovation in schools across the nation This important book offers a clear vision for tomorrow's classrooms that will enhance learning opportunities for all children.

30 review for Education Nation: Six Leading Edges of Innovation in Our Schools

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Overall, I was quite surprised to learn about a lot of resources and of just what was happening around the country back when this was written (2010) that I had not heard of before. I may need to do my own research and see what other great programs and steps are being taken since this was written. I was a little annoyed by his remarks about the last two generation not knowing what a typewriter was. It's great that he gave his daughter a computer in the 90s, but not everyone could afford that. I s Overall, I was quite surprised to learn about a lot of resources and of just what was happening around the country back when this was written (2010) that I had not heard of before. I may need to do my own research and see what other great programs and steps are being taken since this was written. I was a little annoyed by his remarks about the last two generation not knowing what a typewriter was. It's great that he gave his daughter a computer in the 90s, but not everyone could afford that. I still remember working with a typewriter with my parents, and even my friends' parents in the late 90s because computers, at least in rural America back then, were not as common or available. The author did a nice overview of the main factors, or edges, that affect learning/education. Some of these are "the capabilities of educators to think differently about their roles (Thinking Edge); to redesign and implement curricula and assessments (Curriculum Edge); to implement technology (Tech Edge); and change how time and place can improve learning (Time/Place Edge)." Then, it moves on to discuss the Co-Teaching Edge and Youth Edge. A lot of the stories and technologies used were relatable to my own experiences, except in college. Unfortunately, even if these are all really great ideas, there needs to be a lot of funding to produce these resources, which means a change in our priorities as a country, or nation, as he mentions in the Introduction. Getting parents involved is great, but he even mentions how some children have two working parents. Parents may not have enough time because they are trying to make ends meet and just survive. This can even be seen during this Pandemic considering a major concern is for the children that get a lot of their meals from school because their home life cannot afford to provide them. We would need a lot of changes with our society in order to implement these ideas fully everywhere, not just with more funding to education, but also to rethink how we work and how we pay people, as well as what programs are out there for assistance.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Harrison

    In line with my interest in learning more about education, I had the chance to read this book where, little did I know, was sponsored by George Lucas’ foundation. From Star Wars to education, the man has range. What was fascinating about this book was the practical examples they gave of these new educational philosophies. Thanks to Powell’s in Portland for exposing me to this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Patrik Bystrom

    I finally concluded this book. I probably should have put it down rather than read it all. It is a book that has lost all relevance. Not that advice and predictions were poor in 2010, but since most strategies offered are now bread and butter to all teachers it has very little to offer today.

  4. 4 out of 5

    William Lawrence

    Milton Chen's Education Nation gets two stars for his detailed compilation of education ideas. The problem with many of these ideas and theories is that there's no evidence that says spending billions on devices or computers will indeed lead to anything more than comfortable students and wealthier tech companies. He claims schools are locked in a time capsule from thirty years ago, but then in the same paragraph a few sentences later says schools in the 70s were actually better. Which one is it? Milton Chen's Education Nation gets two stars for his detailed compilation of education ideas. The problem with many of these ideas and theories is that there's no evidence that says spending billions on devices or computers will indeed lead to anything more than comfortable students and wealthier tech companies. He claims schools are locked in a time capsule from thirty years ago, but then in the same paragraph a few sentences later says schools in the 70s were actually better. Which one is it? Chen accurately points to the either/or dichotomy that exists in education, but then steps to one side of the either/or effectively committing the very fallacy he points out. There is plenty of the bandwagon appeal here too with Dewey and problem based learning. Chen even commits the "studies have shown" fallacy with no citations to back these claims up. Toward the end of the book he points to reading results and claims "the old methods aren't working." Yet the old methods he's referring to are the methods that replaced the traditional ones others once argued weren't working and needed to be changed for the sake of change. The most disturbing part of this book was the way it came off as anti-teacher: replace the teacher with a computer and have faith that learning will increase. He also advocates longer school days and longer school years, but doesn't mention how we would do this or how teachers will be compensated. Chen is pro-technology, which is a positive stance for education, but he seems to have a blind faith for these unproven tools and devices, which effectively comes off as a promotion for the tech industry more than an analysis of education. Since Chen is a Harvard policy analyst and not a teacher, this book is more of a look inside the windows from the outside.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Susie

    I read this as part of an eBook club sponsored by our DOE. What I liked most about it was the exhaustive footnotes, many complete with links, and separate list of recommended sites in the back. For a topic like this, I think it's very important that you "show, not tell". I think one of the best advantages of technology (that we don't use enough) is sharing success stories, great ideas, great teaching. I've been on the receiving end of so many great teaching ideas, especially at professional conf I read this as part of an eBook club sponsored by our DOE. What I liked most about it was the exhaustive footnotes, many complete with links, and separate list of recommended sites in the back. For a topic like this, I think it's very important that you "show, not tell". I think one of the best advantages of technology (that we don't use enough) is sharing success stories, great ideas, great teaching. I've been on the receiving end of so many great teaching ideas, especially at professional conferences, but it concerns me that today's teachers won't have the same experiences. However, through technology, they can have access to master teachers, collaborate with others, and add to their professional repertoire. One thing that concerns me about a book like this is that part of it will be outdated by the time it's published. I did feel at times that it was more like a commercial for Edutopia, Sesame Street, etc., but frequently Chen through in qualifiers such as the importance of teachers, F2F time with students, and other essential facets of human relationships in education. I've watched several of the videos and have a long resource list to review from the book. An important part of the book is that in the future, many more people will be involved in a student's education, not just the typical classroom teacher of today. It is so ironic in these days of increased testing, many field trips and outside opportunities are being cut, when it is contact with an authentic "outside world" that our students need most.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vicky

    Milton Chen growing up on south side of Chicago, going to Harvard, working on Sesame Street, standing next to Big Bird in a photo of their crew on the Great Wall of China. Cool! I gathered from reviews that he has never taught in a classroom, and neither have I, so I'm following him along and agreeing with his perspective and tone of voice, but with some reservations. Until I get to points he brings up that I haven't thought about before, like rowdy schoolbuses that turn into study halls once wi Milton Chen growing up on south side of Chicago, going to Harvard, working on Sesame Street, standing next to Big Bird in a photo of their crew on the Great Wall of China. Cool! I gathered from reviews that he has never taught in a classroom, and neither have I, so I'm following him along and agreeing with his perspective and tone of voice, but with some reservations. Until I get to points he brings up that I haven't thought about before, like rowdy schoolbuses that turn into study halls once wifi is added, and I liked that he doesn't always make technology to be THE solution, writing that "Healthy development and powerful learning require a balance of time spent with family, friends, and schoolmates, in physical as well as mental activity, in and out of school, in nature as well as in buildings" (175). The six edges: 1) thinking 2) curriculum 3) tech 4) time/place 5) co-teaching 6) youth I can't believe I kept referring to the author as Adrian Chen instead of Milton in forum posts for class. I don't even know how I got the name Adrian Chen in my head but I googled it and found out it was a Gawker blogger whose posts I don't follow. Weird. Conclusion: good to read, I suppose, as it details a variety of programs and successful examples of innovative methods that I wouldn't have been aware of prior, but it's written like an introduction to the topic, almost like a summary + supporting examples format, so I didn't feel totally engaged.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    What I liked about Education Nation is what I disliked about it – namely, someone without experience inside the public education system writing about it without regard for the limitations that system currently has in place. He's able to point to many exciting innovations and be inspiringly imaginative. However, while he acknowledges the restraints that the system has that hinders such innovation, he really fails to address them. Perhaps that's someone else's job; he's just the "idea man." He see What I liked about Education Nation is what I disliked about it – namely, someone without experience inside the public education system writing about it without regard for the limitations that system currently has in place. He's able to point to many exciting innovations and be inspiringly imaginative. However, while he acknowledges the restraints that the system has that hinders such innovation, he really fails to address them. Perhaps that's someone else's job; he's just the "idea man." He seems to be of the "just do it" mentality. If it were only that easy. There are some "take aways" for classroom teachers, but the book is really meant for those higher up with some real influence and decision-making power.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Drawing on decades of extensive experience exploring effective education (that's enough "e" words for the moment!), Milton Chen presents the most cogent, articulate, and practical vision for "creating the new world of learning." Presenting "six leading edges of innovation" for education, Chen backs up his edges with myriad rich examples and even more follow up resources. If I were in charge of the world, I'd use this book as a basis for collaborative inquiry with groups of educators and learners Drawing on decades of extensive experience exploring effective education (that's enough "e" words for the moment!), Milton Chen presents the most cogent, articulate, and practical vision for "creating the new world of learning." Presenting "six leading edges of innovation" for education, Chen backs up his edges with myriad rich examples and even more follow up resources. If I were in charge of the world, I'd use this book as a basis for collaborative inquiry with groups of educators and learners (teachers, administrators, community mentors, parents, and above all, students) in communities wherever there's an interest in improving education.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christian Crowley

    This book feels largely like a listing of all the items the author has collected in a file of news clippings. The common thread of the six "leading edges" functions more like a rough system for organizing descriptions of interesting programs and initiatives than a overarching story. The book presents many ideas worth exploring, sharing and learning more about, though it's difficult to keep them all in mind as the reader progresses from one chapter to the next. This book feels largely like a listing of all the items the author has collected in a file of news clippings. The common thread of the six "leading edges" functions more like a rough system for organizing descriptions of interesting programs and initiatives than a overarching story. The book presents many ideas worth exploring, sharing and learning more about, though it's difficult to keep them all in mind as the reader progresses from one chapter to the next.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    Chen offers a nice compilation of good ideas, but nothing particularly original or world-changing. The content applies primarily to public education. While I applaud both his call to action for a nation (the U.S.) that clearly does not value education and his appreciation of teachers, I found the book not entirely engaging.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Catharine

    I read this for a book discussion for work. The author included a lot of examples, which I thought I would like, but I didn't really find them helpful. I think the main points of this book could have been gotten across much more concisely in a ten page article. The writing style is definitely academic and I did not find it engaging. I read this for a book discussion for work. The author included a lot of examples, which I thought I would like, but I didn't really find them helpful. I think the main points of this book could have been gotten across much more concisely in a ten page article. The writing style is definitely academic and I did not find it engaging.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Milton Chen lays our a compelling vision of school reform. His construct makes great sense and he aligns the visions with examples, including my own organization, The National Academy Foundation. This makes an excellent guidepost of changes in public policy and practice.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    This book was full of so many exciting ideas, and I loved that about it. I basically felt like it was sort of a "Highlights of Edutopia" more than anything else, but the ideas in this book really inspired me and made me think. This book was full of so many exciting ideas, and I loved that about it. I basically felt like it was sort of a "Highlights of Edutopia" more than anything else, but the ideas in this book really inspired me and made me think.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Half-way through the book I realized the author has never been it teacher. He's a cheerleader for every project-based or high-teach teaching idea he's ever heard of. Some of those ideas are good ones, but the book seemed uncritical and not all that thoughtful. Half-way through the book I realized the author has never been it teacher. He's a cheerleader for every project-based or high-teach teaching idea he's ever heard of. Some of those ideas are good ones, but the book seemed uncritical and not all that thoughtful.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    A moderately interesting book about the future of education. Nothing especially novel here, but echoing other recent books on the subject, offers plenty of suggestions for how to improve our education system.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    This is a great book on how we need to teach children that learn is fun. Schools should should use the new technology to teach children that learning should be project based instead of lecture based.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I definitely recommend all educators read this book. The stories of innovative educators and school districts are inspiring and motivating. It got a little long at times with lists of stories, but overall it read quickly and easily. I recommend it!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lmckinney

    Any educator or child advocate will love this. Mr. Chen looks into the future and challenge as old-timers to think futuristic. What if we can send our children to a school where they WANT to go back to school?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pat

    How education is changing - makes you wish you could go back to one of the schools or programs he describes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dustie

    Next book that LP Parents Read is reading ... should be interesting.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Higgins

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1p... https://docs.google.com/document/d/1p...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    Must reading for all educators and politicians and parents. Our education system is antiquated and the time is now for change that will connect the world to students and learning to their brain.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Charles Hoffman

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rick

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy Truesdale

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lario Raicama

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris Elle Dove

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julia Rose

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  30. 4 out of 5

    Steve Barrett

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.