web site hit counter The Summer Walkers: Travelling People and Pearl-Fishers in the Highlands of Scotland - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Summer Walkers: Travelling People and Pearl-Fishers in the Highlands of Scotland

Availability: Ready to download

'The Summer Walkers' is the name the crofters of Scotland's northwest Highlands gave the traveling people—the itinerant tinsmiths, horse-dealers, hawkers, and pearl-fishers—who made their living on the road. They are not gypsies, but are indigenous Gaelic-speaking Scots, who, to this day, remain heirs of a vital and ancient culture. 'The Summer Walkers' is the name the crofters of Scotland's northwest Highlands gave the traveling people—the itinerant tinsmiths, horse-dealers, hawkers, and pearl-fishers—who made their living on the road. They are not gypsies, but are indigenous Gaelic-speaking Scots, who, to this day, remain heirs of a vital and ancient culture.


Compare

'The Summer Walkers' is the name the crofters of Scotland's northwest Highlands gave the traveling people—the itinerant tinsmiths, horse-dealers, hawkers, and pearl-fishers—who made their living on the road. They are not gypsies, but are indigenous Gaelic-speaking Scots, who, to this day, remain heirs of a vital and ancient culture. 'The Summer Walkers' is the name the crofters of Scotland's northwest Highlands gave the traveling people—the itinerant tinsmiths, horse-dealers, hawkers, and pearl-fishers—who made their living on the road. They are not gypsies, but are indigenous Gaelic-speaking Scots, who, to this day, remain heirs of a vital and ancient culture.

41 review for The Summer Walkers: Travelling People and Pearl-Fishers in the Highlands of Scotland

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Really loved this book, its lavish illustrations and its varied portraits of a wide cross-section of individuals. It felt unbiased in its presentation, although I'm sure that's an error in my own perception. I had one wacky experience in the middle of reading it when, during some description or other of Hamish Henderson turning up to interview people, I *longed* to have done my folklore fieldwork in the middle of the 20th century rather than at the end - just found myself longing for the simple Really loved this book, its lavish illustrations and its varied portraits of a wide cross-section of individuals. It felt unbiased in its presentation, although I'm sure that's an error in my own perception. I had one wacky experience in the middle of reading it when, during some description or other of Hamish Henderson turning up to interview people, I *longed* to have done my folklore fieldwork in the middle of the 20th century rather than at the end - just found myself longing for the simple application of notebook and tape-recorder, willing ears and an isolated community. I am not really an academic folklorist nor a fieldworker and this is kind of a false nostalgia, but it's a testament to the strength of this book that not only does it document the folk culture of the mid-20th century Travellers, but it also documents the folk culture of the scholars who were interested in recording their lore. Impossible for me to read this without bringing my own agenda to it. But it's a loving, honest and thorough collection of individual portraits of people who knew and enjoyed a way of life that has changed drastically in recent years (due to a number of things, but notably changes in transport and education laws). This book also gives a terrific ethnographic overview of the Scottish pearl fishing industry (if you can call it that) in the twentieth century, the factors that caused its demise, and a bit about the ecological state of the Scottish river mussel (now desperately endangered) today.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elinor

    Fascinating piece of historical research into two distinct types of summer nomads who once roamed the Scottish Highlands: the "Travellers" who behaved more like gypsies (although they are not Roma gypsies, but ethnic Scots with roots going back to ancient times, often called tinkers); and the "Pearl Fishers" who once made their living by finding pearls in the mussels that thrived in the Scottish rivers (alas, mussels are sadly depleted now and pearl fishing is banned). In the early days, they tra Fascinating piece of historical research into two distinct types of summer nomads who once roamed the Scottish Highlands: the "Travellers" who behaved more like gypsies (although they are not Roma gypsies, but ethnic Scots with roots going back to ancient times, often called tinkers); and the "Pearl Fishers" who once made their living by finding pearls in the mussels that thrived in the Scottish rivers (alas, mussels are sadly depleted now and pearl fishing is banned). In the early days, they travelled by horse and wagon and slept in tents; in the latter years, they drove cars but still camped out. This entire way of life petered out in the 1970s and now most of their descendants are settled in permanent homes. The book made history come alive through the first-person accounts of those who lived through the glory days of travelling around Scotland every summer, and the liberal use of old photographs.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    My sister lent me this book, good read but what I really enjoyed reading was the section on Beurla Reagaird, I speak it Beurla Reagaird and heard it spoken, but this is the first time I actually see it in print as in a book [It's in the Glossary Section of 'The Summer Walkers'] My sister lent me this book, good read but what I really enjoyed reading was the section on Beurla Reagaird, I speak it Beurla Reagaird and heard it spoken, but this is the first time I actually see it in print as in a book [It's in the Glossary Section of 'The Summer Walkers']

  4. 4 out of 5

    Morag

    Wonderful insight into a lost way of life. I've travelled the same roads many times and now i'd like to do it all again with a bow tent instead of a bus. Wonderful insight into a lost way of life. I've travelled the same roads many times and now i'd like to do it all again with a bow tent instead of a bus.

  5. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julia Connor

  8. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

  10. 5 out of 5

    Harry Christian

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mayanne Macgregor

  12. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

  13. 5 out of 5

    Peter

  14. 5 out of 5

    Frances Aitken

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matze

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina Rutter

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

  19. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

  20. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marion

  22. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alaina

  24. 5 out of 5

    Viviana

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mme RX

  26. 5 out of 5

    Deidre

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leah

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gretel

  29. 5 out of 5

    Judy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gale

  31. 5 out of 5

    Moma_jul

  32. 4 out of 5

    Julian Patton

  33. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Burford

  34. 5 out of 5

    Lady Demelza

  35. 5 out of 5

    Julia

  36. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie Kalmbacher

  37. 5 out of 5

    Jena

  38. 5 out of 5

    Kellie

  39. 4 out of 5

    Richard Hing

  40. 4 out of 5

    Jo

  41. 5 out of 5

    Lily

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.