web site hit counter Year's Best Fantasy 5 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Year's Best Fantasy 5

Availability: Ready to download

Magic lives in remarkable realms – and in the short fiction of today's top fantasists. In this fifth breathtaking volume of the year's best flights of the fantastic, award–winning editors David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer present a dazzling new array of wonders – stories that break through the time–honored conventions of the genre to carry the reader to astonishing plac Magic lives in remarkable realms – and in the short fiction of today's top fantasists. In this fifth breathtaking volume of the year's best flights of the fantastic, award–winning editors David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer present a dazzling new array of wonders – stories that break through the time–honored conventions of the genre to carry the reader to astonishing places that only the most ingenious minds could conceive. In the able hands of Neil Gaiman, Kage Baker, Tim Powers, and others, miracles become tangible and true, impossible creatures roam unfettered, and fairy tales are reshaped, sharpened, and freed from the restrictive bonds of childhood. Lose yourself in these pages and in these worlds – and discover the power, the beauty, the unparalleled enchantment of fantasy at its finest.


Compare

Magic lives in remarkable realms – and in the short fiction of today's top fantasists. In this fifth breathtaking volume of the year's best flights of the fantastic, award–winning editors David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer present a dazzling new array of wonders – stories that break through the time–honored conventions of the genre to carry the reader to astonishing plac Magic lives in remarkable realms – and in the short fiction of today's top fantasists. In this fifth breathtaking volume of the year's best flights of the fantastic, award–winning editors David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer present a dazzling new array of wonders – stories that break through the time–honored conventions of the genre to carry the reader to astonishing places that only the most ingenious minds could conceive. In the able hands of Neil Gaiman, Kage Baker, Tim Powers, and others, miracles become tangible and true, impossible creatures roam unfettered, and fairy tales are reshaped, sharpened, and freed from the restrictive bonds of childhood. Lose yourself in these pages and in these worlds – and discover the power, the beauty, the unparalleled enchantment of fantasy at its finest.

30 review for Year's Best Fantasy 5

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hirondelle

    I love short stories, and love how anthologies can be like a buffet, a bit of everything and you can discover loving dishes you would not have tried. This anthology is rather mixed, the stories I loved come from the usual suspects (Peter Beagle, Kage Baker, Neil Gaiman, Patricia McKillip, Tanith Lee). The rest, some interesting ideas or interesting writing apart from a remarkably bad bad story.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Caitlyn

    I LOVE Hartwell's Year's Best SF, so I was thrilled to see this at a used book store a few months back. However, it was much more hit-or-miss than his other anthologies. It seems like this was a year when everyone decided to write their fantasy short stories like they were 19th century relics. Like, what is this diction, people?? Are you trying to sound "lofty" or do you think that's just how "meaningful" literature sounds? So most of the stories I didn't enjoy have that annoying writing style t I LOVE Hartwell's Year's Best SF, so I was thrilled to see this at a used book store a few months back. However, it was much more hit-or-miss than his other anthologies. It seems like this was a year when everyone decided to write their fantasy short stories like they were 19th century relics. Like, what is this diction, people?? Are you trying to sound "lofty" or do you think that's just how "meaningful" literature sounds? So most of the stories I didn't enjoy have that annoying writing style that suggests they are trying to Make a Statement on Society. However, the better ones in this set were really, really good. 5/5 Robert Reed "Dragons of Summer Gulch" Most excellent!! It's a fantasy Western where the most unexpected characters steal the show by the end. A man is out looking for dragon fossils (basically panning for gold) and finds something valuable enough to involve him in a much more daring plot. Original and fast-paced. I thought this was easily the best story in the set. 3/5 Theodora Gross "Miss Emily Gray" A "be careful what you wish for" story. It has a dark Mary Poppins coming into the life of a little girl and her father. 3/5 John Kessel "The Baum Plan for Financial Independence" Interesting, I guess? I don't think I really understood what was going on in this story. Two people break into a rich person's summer house and find a basement full of people and some kind of bank? Surreal, but hard to understand. 4/5 Barbara Robson "Lizzy Lou" Very odd, very short story about a girl whose sister is slowly shrinking every year and she is the only one to notice. 5/5 Dale Bailey "The End of the World as We Know It" Great. Really different perspective on an end-of-the-world story. A man wakes up and everyone has died suddenly and without explanation. He wanders and thinks. ??/5 Kage Baker "Leaving His Cares Behind Him" Wow, I know I read this the first time a few months ago, but even rereading about six paragraphs throughout just now I still cannot remember for the life of me what this one was about. Must not have been terribly memorable. 3/5 Neil Gaiman "The Problem of Susan" Interesting story about Susan from the Narnia series, grown up. A good idea, but just wasn't that enjoyable. 5/5 Kim Westwood "Stella’s Transformation" I remember enjoying this so much. A man helps Stella by reading her to sleep every night, and the story/her dream starts to seep into the world around her. It is actually really hard to describe beyond that, though. 3/5 David D. Levine "Charlie the Purple Giraffe Was Acting Strangely" An odd, kind of creepy story about a character in a comic strip becoming self-aware and slowly driving away his cartoon friends and unseen readers with what everyone perceives as his psychotic behavior. 2/5 Tim Powers "Pat Moore" I felt like this should have been more interesting, but it just wasn't. Surreal and told in a detached narrative style that just didn't really draw me in. I just couldn't get too invested in Pat Moore. 1/5 Kit Reed "Perpetua" Reeeeally heavy-handed critique of... patriarchy? I think? This is one of those with that "lofty" writing style I can't stand. A girl and her sisters are all called home by their father so that they can escape the end of the world by living inside of a turtle. What is the turtle a metaphor for? I don't even know. I felt like it was trying so hard that it was meaningless. 1/5 Peter S. Beagle "Quarry" I didn't get through this one. Maybe it's better if you read the rest of his stuff, but this story just dragged. One of those, "I'm leaving things mysterious so you want to know more about the world" kind of books, but I just... didn't. I didn't want to know more. I just wanted him to tell me why I should give a shit about these characters it seemed assumed I knew so much about already. Written in aforementioned irritating style. Basically, kid escapes (weird religious cult?) only to find he's going to be hunted down by unstoppable killers. Narrowly escapes due to the intervention of someone Strange and Mysterious. They are both running from something. 4/5 John Meaney "Diva’s Bones" Rad idea, a society powered by the bones of people who have died, power coming from their lives and memories decaying under the city. Detective fiction, where our detective is tasked with protecting the diva and her valuable bones from a murderer who is killing creative types for the narcotic properties of their remains. Weeeeeeird idea, cool story. 3/5 Bruce McAllister "The Seventh Daughter" I didn't really get it. Surreal, but in a hard-to-understand-what's-happening sort of way. Kid plays with model of small town, which has strange properties. 5/5 Tim Pratt "Life in Stone" Characters and story were interesting. An assassin's lover is an immortal who has started longing for death, tasking said lover with finding his soul. Interesting ideas, well-executed story. 3/5 M. Rickert "Many Voices" Story about a witch whose ability to see angels is seen as a mental disorder. I didn't really enjoy this one. The diction made it hard to relate to the character, and maybe feeling detached wasn't entirely a bad thing, but I would have liked to feel more feelings while I read this story. The content is pretty intense - murder, rape, illness, institutionalization - but the narrator uses a version of that Important Piece of Fiction tone and that makes it feel weirdly intellectualized without feeling very intellectual. Felt like lots of unfulfilled potential. 4/5 Richard Parks "A Hint of Jasmine" Oo, ghost mystery! Ghosts are objectively real (and measurable!), and this professional has been called in to check out the haunting of a house in his Southern hometown. There is drama between the mother and daughter who are running their ancestral home as a tourist attraction/bed and breakfast, and the investigator sees that the mysteries of the ghosts are intimately entwined with the living. 3/5 Tanith Lee "Elvenbrood" Interesting story about Fairies, a twist on the classic tale of strange beings abducting children. Small family moves to the countryside where the mother and daughter are thrilled with the forest views, but the narrator realizes something odd is going on. 4/5 Joel Lane "Beyond the River" The plot of this story was actually a bit slow and not super interesting, but I really enjoyed the relationship between the characters and the voice of the narrator. It's a very character-driven story, which I think keeps it from feeling predictable or dull. 4/5 Patricia A. McKillip "Out of the Woods" I enjoyed this one. Woman is married to a woodcutter/carpenter who works all day in the forest and working for a mage who studies magic all day, but she is far more observant of the magic in the woods than either of them. 3/5 Steven Brust "The Man from Shemhaza" Pretty good story, twist ending. A musician gets involved in the theft of something powerful and dangerous. (I'm really interested in the world - Hartwell's forward to this story was really more interesting than the story itself.) Terry Bisson "Death’s Door" Not going to lie, the forward described this as a story where "Death takes a year off" and a dog got hit by a car on the first page and I just decided I couldn't handle that shit. 5/5 Nalo Hopkinson "The Smile on the Face" Oh, Nalo Hopkinson, you never disappoint!! An excellent story that puts magic into the life of a modern teenage girl. She overcomes some of the trials of growing up by realizing a strong, and magical!, connection to nature and the past. So sweet and so powerful. *I feel like I should point out that Hopkinson's story makes a definite statement on society, but was both entertaining and current. The writing was fast-paced, natural, and a joy to read. Just saying, Kit Reed. Just saying. 4/5 Gene Wolfe "Golden City Far" Surreal story about dreams and reality affecting one another. A boy starts dreaming the same dream every night, and elements of reality and dream infiltrate one another. The boy, his neighbor's dog, and his girlfriend are not surprised by this, but the adults in his life are pretty concerned.

  3. 4 out of 5

    CJ Bowen

    "The Dragons of Summer Gulch" - Robert Reed. Could be an episode of Firefly. Great story. "The End of the World as We Know" - Dale Bailey. Would be great for a high-schooler just discovering PoE. World ends with a whimper, enabling me to misinterpret Job, so I can mock God. "The Problem of Susan" - Neil Gaiman. Nasty, obscene. Avoid, Narnians. "Pat Moore" - Tim Powers. So strange, but engaging. "Perpetua" - Kit Reed. I hate my father, and all fathers! I am a feminist, and subtlety is cowardice! "Quar "The Dragons of Summer Gulch" - Robert Reed. Could be an episode of Firefly. Great story. "The End of the World as We Know" - Dale Bailey. Would be great for a high-schooler just discovering PoE. World ends with a whimper, enabling me to misinterpret Job, so I can mock God. "The Problem of Susan" - Neil Gaiman. Nasty, obscene. Avoid, Narnians. "Pat Moore" - Tim Powers. So strange, but engaging. "Perpetua" - Kit Reed. I hate my father, and all fathers! I am a feminist, and subtlety is cowardice! "Quarry" - Peter S. Beagle. Finally, a master. True fantasy story, makes me want to read more about these character. Thankfully, I can. (NtS - find "The Innkeeper's Song" by Beagle) It maybe wasn't fair to the others to give Gene Wolfe fifty pages to end the book, but it was a great way to finish. Very different from New Sun stuff, but excellent and fun.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chere

    Another fantasy anthology that I enjoyed. A few of the stories here I've previously read; there are some that did not leave a particularly strong impression, but others were quite memorable. I once again found myself wondering how the other works of authors I've first encountered here are. It was overall a good dose of fantasy for me! Another fantasy anthology that I enjoyed. A few of the stories here I've previously read; there are some that did not leave a particularly strong impression, but others were quite memorable. I once again found myself wondering how the other works of authors I've first encountered here are. It was overall a good dose of fantasy for me!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael Blackmore

    Very hit and miss. With several hits and several misses and a several meh - maybe broken in thirds. I think I've been losing my interest in some of the anthology series. Maybe it is because everyone wants to be important, rather than remembering to entertain too. Very hit and miss. With several hits and several misses and a several meh - maybe broken in thirds. I think I've been losing my interest in some of the anthology series. Maybe it is because everyone wants to be important, rather than remembering to entertain too.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Some very good ones in this collection.

  7. 4 out of 5

    bluetyson

    Year's Best Fantasy 5 (Year's Best Fantasy) by David Hartwell (2005) Year's Best Fantasy 5 (Year's Best Fantasy) by David Hartwell (2005)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Spike Anderson

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melinda Blaloch

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marc

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jonah

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Borges

  13. 4 out of 5

    Felix Marwick

  14. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nongingercat

  17. 4 out of 5

    Connie

  18. 4 out of 5

    W. P.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elihu

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  21. 4 out of 5

    Miburk

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ariadne Bissett

  23. 4 out of 5

    T.J.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Colin Doubleslash

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.